From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Prepupal Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar
Location: New Jersey
September 10, 2013 7:15 am
Can you tell me how long before we have an emergence? I would like to video if around at the time. These are the latest pictures from this morning. Thank you! 🙂
Signature: Interested, Barbara

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis

Hi Barbara,
Even though Mike sent the original photo, we suspect your Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis is the same as the pre-pupal Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar we recently posted.  Normally we would expect eclosion of the adult to occur in a few weeks, but this individual might be preparing to pass the winter as a chrysalis.

Yes, it is the same. I had posted the picture to FB that Mike copied and sent to you because I was inquiring if anyone knew what it was and couldn’t find anything online. He is the Pastor at our churchJ and found your site. He is very resourceful. Thank you for the information. So, we just wait and watch. I am hoping those little silky threads can sustain it through winter and windsJ thank you for your time in responding to me! Barbara (and Father Mike)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Jacktet Hover Fly
Location: Pittsburg, PA
September 10, 2013 10:08 am
Not a question, just sending for your info, as I couldn’t find a sighting that wasn’t in a southern state. I wrote you before I figured out what he was. Once I had, it did it was from southern states, and I’m in Pittsburgh, PA. I’ve lived here 8 years and never saw him until this spring, and since then he visited me every day. Today he was on my hand and other areas repeatedly, and for long periods. Glad I knew by then he wasn’t a very large hornet!
Signature: Michelle

Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Hi Michelle,
Thanks for sending us your fun photo of a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly,
Milesia virginiensis.  Though most of our submissions are from the south, BugGuide lists the range as extending even further north than Pittsburgh.  We love the common name Good News Bee which you can read about on Beautiful Wildlife Garden.

Update:  September 4, 2018
Dead Link On What’s That Bug
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey What’s That Bug Team
Ann here, from A Green Hand
I’m writing a post (for A Green Hand) on the topic of Good News Bee, and I actually found one of What’s That Bug
The link is in this post.
It goes to this page: http://www.beautifulwildlifegarden.com/good-news-bee.html
It looks like it used to be a guide about Good News Bee, but Beautiful Wildlife Garden removed it a while back.
We actually have a similar information to Good News Bees here – it might make a nice replacement?
(just to clarify, we DO talk about Good News Bees in this article, which is what you’re talking about in the guide on What’s That Bug)
Either way, just thought I’d let you know! – we’ll be mentioning and linking to you in our guide.

Thanks Ann,
We have linked to A Green Hand.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada killer with prey
Location: Roe, Monroe County, Arkansas
September 10, 2013 8:33 am
Thought I’d share this lucky shot with my cell phone camera! Taken 10:15 AM 9/10/2013 in Monroe County, AR. I was sitting on my porch enjoying the sunshine, and saw something fall from the tree. I was thrilled to watch this cicada killer drag her prey up the tree, where she paused above my hammock rope long enough for me to take a picture.
Signature: Sherry Young

Cicada Killer and Prey

Cicada Killer and Prey

Hi Sherry,
We believe this is the only photo of a Cicada Killer and her prey we have received this year.  Cicada Killers often drag paralyzed Cicadas up a tree or other high spot because they can then glide and fly toward the underground nest.  It is very difficult to gain altitude from the ground with such a heavy load.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Jacket Mimic
Location: Ritzville, WA
September 10, 2013 10:54 am
I noticed this insect while pumping gas at a gas station near Ritzville, WA. It’s legs will twitch spontaneously like a yellow jackets’ back legs do. It stayed very still otherwise.
Signature: Thank you Glen

Locust Borer

Locust Borer

Hi Glen,
This Locust Borer is a very effective Yellow Jacket Mimic.  Adult Locust Borers are often found on goldenrod in the autumn.  Larvae bore into black locust trees.  According to BugGuide:  “Considered a serious pest of Black Locust trees; previously weakened or damaged trees are often killed by an infestation of the larvae. Previously confined to the native range of Black Locust in the northeast, it has spread with the trees throughout the US. Unfortunately Black Locust is used for reclamation and similar projects where trees are likely to be stressed out and thus more vulnerable to insect damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Caterpillar – Australia
Location: NSW Australia
September 10, 2013 8:02 pm
Hey Bugman,
Came across this quirky looking caterpillar yesterday and have never seen one like this before.
I am in the Hawkesbury region of NSW, Australia.
The caterpillar is about 5cm long. Would love to know what he or she will eventually become.
I also have a video of him if you would like to see it, he is just adorable.
http://youtu.be/8cbvojLG5n4
Thanks
Signature: Tracy

Unknown Caterpillar

Sparshalli Moth Caterpillar

Hi Tracy,
We did a quick scan of Butterfly House, but we didn’t have any luck identifying your caterpillar.  We really must go to bed now.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist us in identifying your distinctive caterpillar.

Update:  September 26, 2013
One of our readers supplied a comment indicating this might be the caterpillar of the Sparshalli Moth,
Trichiocercus sparshalli, and based on photos on the Brisbane Insect Website and Butterfly House, we agree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting bug??
Location: Western Pennsylvania
September 11, 2013 4:52 pm
Bugman, I am a commercial roofer and we have recently come across an insect on two different jobs/ locations that we are unfamiliar with. Hope you can help us out. Thanks.
Signature: Michael Miano

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi Michael,
This Assassin Bug is commonly called a Wheel Bug because of the coglike appearance of its thorax.  Wheel Bugs, like other Assassin Bugs, will deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination