From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Castle Unknown
Location: New Castle, PA
September 12, 2013 6:09 pm
Found this guy hanging on the outside wall of out office about 11:15 9/12/13. Body length I would estimate at 2.5 inches. Would like to know what this is and if native or not. Can’t say I have ever seen one in this area.
Signature: Paul Meahl

Female Conehead Katydid

Female Conehead Katydid

Hi Paul,
This appears to be a Conehead Katydid in the tribe Copiphorini, which you can view on BugGuide, however, we are not certain of the species, though we suspect it might be a Broad-Tipped Conehead,
Neoconocephalus triops.  Coneheads are native.  Your individual is a female, as evidenced by the swordlike ovipositor at the tip of her abdomen.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a species name for us.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown parasite of Acronicta oblinita
Location: Marsh in Salamonie Reservoir, NE Indiana
September 12, 2013 7:30 am
Bugman,
On Aug. 24 you helped my mother identify the Smartweed Caterpillar / Smeared Dagger Moth (Acronicta oblinita) that I found on a Rose Milkweed (Ascelpias incarnata) in a marsh. I collected another from a willow branch and brought it home. It stopped moving completely and even starting spinning a strange web. To my wife’s horror, dozens of small yellow parasites slowly emerged from its side as it was still (apparently?) alive. They all seemed to perish in the hot sun and the ants had a feast. Photo attached.
I searched Google Scholar for some clues…
I see a 1903 reference to a ”Rhogas rileyi Cress” being parasitic, mentioning the silk I saw (p. 24 here: http://bit.ly/1atDh3W). However, I cannot find R. rileyi Cress in recent mention so I wonder if the name has been updated. I see a recent publication noting that the parasitic wasp Aleiodes rileyi Cresson often chooses A. oblinita as a host, but it did not seem to undergo the mummification described.
Signature: Adam Thada

Parasitized Smartweed Caterpillar

Parasitized Smartweed Caterpillar

Hi Adam,
We are very impressed with your research, but in our opinion, the parasites that emerged from the Smartweed Caterpillar look more like fly larvae to us, so with that in mind, we would lean more toward this being an instance of parasitization by Tachinid Fly.  We have not been able to uncover any evidence, and that is just our first impression.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck determining What Parasitized the Smartweed Caterpillar?

Parasitized Smartweed Caterpillar

Parasitized Smartweed Caterpillar

Comment courtesy of Erwin
Subject: What Parasitized the Smartweed Caterpillar???
December 13, 2013 5:45 am
Hi,
Going through some older posts I found one submitted on Sept.13, 2013 by Adam Thada. These parasites are Braconidae for sure. Braconidae (genus Apanteles and others) are well known as parasites of Acronycta caterpillars.
Here you can see as an example larvae of Braconidae coming out of a caterpillar of Pieris sp.
(Please scroll down)
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Hi Erwin,
Your comment was written as though you provided a link by indicating to “scroll down”.  We did not get the link.

Subject: here is the link
December 13, 2013 9:04 am
Dear Daniel,
here is the required link: http://www.ingana.de/html_insekten/hymenoptera/hymenoptera-hautfluegler-wespen-schlupfwespen.html
Signature: Erwin Beyer

The Braconids in the link you provided look exactly like the ones submitted to us.  Thanks Erwin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Female Cross Orbweaver?
Location: Northern Central New Jersey
September 11, 2013 8:13 am
Hi ,
I thought you might be interested in my new acquaintance. I call her Orba. I believe (correct me if I’m wrong) that it’s a female Cross Orbweaver spider. I’ve been walking by her for nearly a month now. Her webs are expansive, intricate and three-dimensional. She’ll take them down and seem to disappear only to reappear by the next day or so building an entirely new intricate web. I can’t get my camera real close to her as there are layers of web from whatever angle I can get. I don’t want to muss up her living quarters! She appeared in mid-August and is still doing very well now as I write this. Love your site! (And I love shooting insects with my camera!)
Signature: Jackie in Jersey

Cross Orbweaver

Cross Orbweaver

Hi Jackie,
We agree that your spider, which matches this image on BugGuide, appears to be a Cross Orbweaver,
Araneus diadematus, though we cannot see the pedipalps visible on the BugGuide image, so we can’t say for certain this is a female.  The sexes are more equal in size in the Cross Orbweaver than in many other Orbweavers.  The Cross Orbweaver is a species that gained fame in 1973 when Anita and Arabella went into space aboard Skylab 3, which is mentioned in About.comYour photo of the web actually appears to be two distinct orbs, which would mean two individual spiders.

Two Orb Webs

Two Orb Webs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Central PA
September 10, 2013 2:59 pm
This insect shows up on our covered back porch above the door at night only after the porch light had been on for awhile. I never see them during the day. I believe they live behind the porch light. They are about 1 1/2 – 1 3/4 inches long. My wife thinks they are cicada killers, but I believe they might be scarab hunter wasps. They seem pretty docile and have never stung anyone. I do have a sting allergy and have some reservations about using this door at night. Anyone light you can shed on this would be very much appreciated.
Signature: Rick Davis

European Hornets

European Hornets

Dear Rick,
These are European Hornets, an introduced species that might be negatively impacting native species by preying upon them and displacing them in the food chain.  They might have a nest in the attic.  We have read on BugGuide that they are attracted to lights, so your letter is evidence that is correct.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for the quick reply.  You certainly nailed this one.  According to the literature you referenced, the nest will move on after the queen dies.  (I made a small donation to your site.)  Thanks again.
Rick

That was very kind of your Rick.  Thanks for the support.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green bug we found
Location: Jacksonville, FL
September 8, 2013 3:53 pm
Dear Bugman,
My friend found this green bug on the windshield of his car in Jacksonville, Florida this week,( early September). We’re wondering if you know what kind of bug it is?
Thanks so much,
Signature: Curious

Crowned Slug Caterpillar

Crowned Slug Caterpillar

Dear Curious,
This is a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug found near dam
Location: Southern NSW, Australia
September 12, 2013 2:40 am
Hi from Down Under,
My husband was planting bushes with some colleagues near a dam in Southern NSW when they saw this very strange bug. He said that it is approximately 7 centimetres long and as you can see from the photos has a type of helmet shell on it’s back.
Signature: Regina Knight

Shield Shrimp

Shield Shrimp

Hi Regina,
This primitive crustacean in the genus
Triops is commonly called a Shield Shrimp in Australia, and in other parts of the world including North America it is called a Tadpole Shrimp.  The Project Triops Australiensis website is still active and has some local information for you, though incorrectly it seems to use family and genus names interchangeably. 

Shield Shrimp

Shield Shrimp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination