From the daily archives: "Monday, December 30, 2013"

Subject: Bug
Location: Columbus, OH
December 29, 2013 7:15 pm
What kind of bug is this? I’m in Columbus, OH and it’s winter. This is the third one I’ve seen in two days in my house. 2 in my upstairs bedroom & one in my downstairs living room.
Signature: Jess

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Hi Jess,
This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and Stink Bugs often enter homes to hibernate when the weather cools.
  Your photo lacks critical clarity, but we believe this is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, an invasive, exotic species from Asia that is spreading in North America.  More information on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug can be found on Field Crop News.

Subject: Bugs in my Bathroom
Location: West Michigan
December 29, 2013 8:05 pm
Recently I have been finding these bugs all around on the floor of my bathroom. They are usually lying on their backs and look like they are dead, but when I pick them up they try to crawl away. They are approximately 5/8inch long. Are Blackish brown, with a tannish colored band around them. They don’t seem harmful, but I do not care much for creepy crawlies in my home. I have looked at hundreds of pictures online, but could not find them. I would really appreciate it if you could identify them for me. Thank You!
Signature: Buggy Bathroom

Larder Beetle

Larder Beetle

Dear Buggy Bathroom,
Despite the extreme blurriness of your image, the pattern on this Larder Beetle,
Dermestes lardarius, is very evident.  Larder Beetles infest stored foods, including dried meats and pet food.  Perhaps you have a large bag of pet food that they are feeding upon.  According to the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences Entomology site:  “The larder beetle is a commercial pest as well as a household pest. This is a cosmopolitan species which was historically a pest of cured meats in Europe, the United States, and Canada. The use of refrigeration, the purchase of meats in small quantities, and the lack of home curing of meats, have decreased the economic importance of this insect. However, these beetles are still common in homes, museums, mills, livestock facilities, and any place that contains a suitable food source. Typically, these would include any animal by-product such as dried dog food, furs, hides, and feathers. Also, many pantry items can become infested. Another potential food source are dead insects in attic and wall voids that become trapped when they seek an overwintering site. In the fall insects such as flies, bugs, beetles and wasps, accumulate in attics and similar spaces in the home. Many of the hibernating insects die, attracting larder beetles which lay eggs on dead insects. The larvae of the larder beetle then feed on the dead insects.”  We would encourage you to search out the site of the infestation, and it might not necessarily be in the bathroom.

Thank You so much, I don’t know how I missed that picture. This is definately what they are. I started seeing the Larve first then the beetles shortly after I bombed my house for fleas, so they may be feeding on other dead bugs in the walls.   Thank you again.

Subject: bug unidentified
Location: Victoria, Australia
December 30, 2013 1:11 am
Hi,
My name is Ivan, i live in Victoria, Australia , recently they stared to build a house behind my home, since then these unidentified bugs have migrated to my backyeard.
There all over my windows and trying to get into my house, i have googled this unidentified bug and can not find anything on it, there are similar ones but not the same. I got pest control to come over ande see the bugs but they told me they were Springtail bugs because they have two antenas when he left i googled this Springtail bug and it doe not look like it at all.
I have taken photos and measured two of them a small one and a large one, the sizes are the smallest one 3mm and the larger one is 6mm.
Please help with identifing this bug. I dont want this bug to hurt my family especially my 5 month old daughter.
regards
Signature: Ivan

Unknown Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Dear Ivan,
All three images you submitted are True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and they are definitely NOT Springtails.  Two of your photos appear to be the same species and they are immature.  Due to their small size, we are speculating that they are either Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, or Chinch Bugs in the family Blissidae.  It may be difficult to determine the exact species as they are immature specimens.

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

The third photograph appears to be a different species, and it most closely resembles the Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs in the superfamily Pentatomoidea, but due to its small size, we cannot be certain.  It is a winged adult.  Compare your but to this North American Shield Bug Sphyrocoris obliquus that is pictured on BugGuide.  We are posting your photos and tagging them as unidentified.  We will attempt further research if time permits and perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some helpful information.  In our opinion, both species may present a nuisance due to their large numbers, but we don’t believe either species poses a direct threat to your family.

Unknown True Bug

Unknown True Bug

 

 

Subject: Pyramid Head
Location: Central Coast, Australia
December 30, 2013 5:25 am
Hey, I found this bug on the side of my house and (obviously) have no idea what its is
I dubbed it pyramid head, named after the monster from silent hill.
thank you in advance.
Signature: Amber

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Amber,
While we have not been able to quickly find a conclusive species match for your Free Living Hemipteran, we are relatively confident that it is a Leafhopper in the family Cicadellidae, and probably a Flatheaded Leafhopper in the subfamily Ledrinae.  The Brisbane Insect website has a few photos of immature specimens that bear a resemblance to your insect.  PaDIL, the Pests and Diseases Image Library has a page on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter and other native insects is can be confused with, and though many of those look similar, none seems to be an exact match either.  We continued to search and then we discovered the World’s Largest Leafhopper,
Ledromorpha planirostris, back on the Brisbane Insect website, and we are relatively confident that is your species.  We don’t understand how we missed it the first pass we made on the Brisbane Insect website.