From the daily archives: "Saturday, December 28, 2013"

Subject: Damselfly
Location: mumbai
December 28, 2013 11:06 am
Hey there once again!
we get to see a lot of damselflies and i was able to identify golden dartlets and eastern forktails however this fellow remains unidentified.
Probably still immature
Signature: Sid

Damselfly

Damselfly

Subject: damselflies
Location: navi mumbai
December 28, 2013 11:10 am
Its dragon fly and damselfly season. i thought it would be cool to post photos of some commonly found damsels.
golden dartlets and eastern forktails are the most common ones here
Signature: Sid

Golden Dartlet

Golden Dartlet

Hi Sid,
Thanks for sending your lovely Damselfly images.  We have combined your two emails into one posting since they can both be categorized as Damselflies.  They are a great addition to our site.  We do have a request.  One submission was listed as Mumbai and the other as Navi Mumbai.  Can you please clarify the difference in the locations if any.

Eastern Forktail

Eastern Forktail

 

Subject: Please help!
Location: Alaska
December 28, 2013 9:31 am
This was in my bath tub and I’ve never seen this kind of bug before!
Signature: KMB

Cricket

Cricket

Dear KMB,
This is some species of Cricket in the family Gryllidae, and after searching through images on BugGuide, we believe the long pointed wings most closely resemble the characteristics of the Robust Ground Crickets in the genus
Allonemobius.  The dark head and brown wings are also a characteristic we are trying to match.  The image of the Striped Ground Cricket, Allonemobius fasciatus, on PBase is a pretty close match.

Subject: South African Grasshopper
Location: False Bay, Western Cape, South Africa
December 28, 2013 4:54 am
I’m having trouble identifying this little chap I found in my garden – he is only a couple of centimetres long, and nothing in my insect book looks quite like him.
I’m new to the Bug world, so not sure yet quite how diverse the colours get within some classifications, and would appreciate a definitive identification !
Thank you.
Signature: Cathy

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hi Cathy,
This is an immature Grasshopper, and it is generally adult insects that are picture in guide books, which may be the reason you are having difficulty in your identification.  Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills with South African species to be able to provide you with an identification, but perhaps one of our readers will write in with something helpful.  Your photos are quite beautiful.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Subject: Curious to what it is??
Location: North America (Oklahoma)
December 28, 2013 10:12 am
Hi, I found this little guy crawling on me. ( I assume it is a transfer from my dog) but not sure what it is. Thanks in advance
Signature: Sincerely, DH

Human Louse or other Louse???

Human Louse or other Louse???

Dear DH,
This is a Louse, and we don’t believe there is enough detail in your image to make a conclusive identification, but it looks suspiciously like a Human Louse,
Pediculus humanus, that is pictured on BugGuide.  You can get much helpful information from the Penn State University Entomology Department fact sheet on Human Lice, including:  “Anyone can get lice no matter how clean they are about their personal hygiene and their homes. Lice do not feed on dirt; they feed on blood! People get lice from people. They don’t come from pets. (Dog and cat lice do not infest man.)”  The image of the Dog Louse, Trichodectes canis, on Molecular Expressions:  Science, Optics & You as well as the image on BugGuide look different than your image.

Subject: Two Striped Walking Stick
Location: Daytona Beach, FL
December 23, 2013 9:49 am
Just thought this female was cool. She was hanging out on the side of the house and my grandpa scooped her up for me to see. We put her back after the photo and she went on her merry way.
Signature: Lindsey

Muskmare

Muskmare

Hi Lindsey,
Thanks for sending us your photo.  We want to caution you that the Two Striped Walkingstick, also known as a Muskmare, is capable of expelling a noxious substance with amazing accuracy.  They have a knack for aiming right at a perceived predator’s eyes.

Subject: florida bug
Location: south florida
December 26, 2013 8:34 pm
What is it?
Signature: mary

Dragonfly with missing abdomen

Green Darner with missing abdomen

Hi Mary,
Some predator, probably a bird, caught this Dragonfly and ate the abdomen, leaving the less palatable head, wings and legs for you to find.  Your Dragonfly is a Green Darner,
Anax junius, and you can read up more on this species on BugGuide where it states:  “Adults are strong flyers and may be found anywhere but are more common near larval habitat: still marshy waters, fresh and slightly brackish.”