From the daily archives: "Friday, December 27, 2013"

Subject: Moth ID, please
Location: SW Nassau County, NY
December 27, 2013 7:08 am
I shot this last August on Long Island, NY.
Love seeing the reach of the proboscis?
Signature: Carl

Skipper

Peck’s Skipper

Hi Carl,
This is not a moth, but rather a Skipper, a member of the butterfly family Hesperiidae, a group that has traditionally been considered an evolutionary transition between the more primitive moths and the more advanced butterflies.  Alas, we are not very good at species or genus identification of Skippers, which according to BugGuide are:  “Generally small, mostly orange or brown butterflies with short fat bodies, hooked antennae and rapid, skipping flight. Some species (chiefly Spreadwing Skippers, subfamily Pyrginae) hold their wings in a single flat plane, many others hold hind wings flat and forewings at an angle.”

Update
Thanks to a comment from Richard Stickney, we now know that this is Peck’s Skipper,
Polites peckius, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject: stages of the same beetle?
Location: Chiriqui province, Panama
December 26, 2013 5:55 pm
The first photo was taken on 12/17, the second on 12/25. Are all of these beetles the same kind, just in various stages of development or is the color difference related to sex?
Signature: Linda

Giant Mesquite Bug nymphs and adult

Giant Mesquite Bug nymphs and adult

Hi Linda,
Your assessment of the insects in these photos is partially correct and partially incorrect.  You are correct that they are various stages of development of the same species, however these are Big Legged Bugs or Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae, not beetles.  Beetles undergo complete metamorphosis, and they transform from grubs that bear no resemblance to the adults.  True Bugs undergo incomplete metamorphosis, and nymphs look similar in structure to adults, though they might have different colors and markings.  Your Big Legged Bugs are Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus, most likely Thasus acutangulus.

Giant Mesquite Bugs

Giant Mesquite Bugs

Thank you once again. Fascinating. Very helpful.

Subject: Bug living on Citrus Tree
Location: Sydney Australia
December 27, 2013 1:50 am
Hi Bugman,
My 3 yo spends a lot of time in the garden with insects. He has me stumped on this bug we’ve found on a citrus tree leave in Southern Hemisphere summer (Dec). Can u help?
Signature: Aranchii

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Hi Aranchii,
We did a web search of “stink bug citrus Australia” and we found an image of your Bronze Orange Stink Bug,
Musgraveia sulciventris, on the Butterfly House website where we frequently search for Australian caterpillars.  Seems they have a page devoted to the lemon tree.  According to the Brisbane Insect website:  “They suck sap from young shoots of of the plants. The first and second pictures above show the bugs sucking the juice from the new shot of the Citrus plant. Notice their sucking mouth-parts and the wilted tips of the plant. …  After mating the females lay eggs on leaf for the next generations.”

Thanks for the quick response Daniel!

Subject: bug
Location: delaware ohio
December 26, 2013 8:00 pm
Please tell me what this is
Signature: aysia

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear aysia,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and late December is a very unusual time for a sighting.  Perhaps we should include additional questions on our submission form, including “When did the sighting occur?” and “Why do you want to know?” because that kind of information will help us formulate a response.  We try to make things as easy as possible for folks who are writing to us, but that doesn’t help us when we are trying to craft a response that satisfies the real reason a person wants to know: What’s That Bug?, especially with folks of few words.  Because it appears to be nestled in a paper towel, we suspect you found this Ivory Marked Beetle in your home and you want to make sure it isn’t going to do any damage, but you never clarified any of that.  The larvae of the Ivory Marked Beetle are borers that will feed on a “wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood” according to BugGuide.  We speculate this individual might have emerged early from some firewood you brought into the house and didn’t burn immediately, or this individual might have emerged from milled lumber because BugGuide also notes it is:  “Notorious for emerging from furniture after as many as 10-40 yrs.”  You do not need to worry about Ivory Marked Beetles infesting the wooden furniture or structural wood of your home.