From the daily archives: "Friday, December 20, 2013"

Subject: aaaaah!!! YUCK.
Location: walnut creek, ca. 94596 (east bay area suburb)
December 20, 2013 12:32 am
hello.
ive found more of these disgusting little suckers than id care to think about. and even worse~ considering how theyve managed to go nearly unnoticed each and every time i DO discover one of them, i am left twitching at the slightest breath of air that contacts any and ALL hairs on my body!!! UGH. and, because i havent the slightest clue as to just what kind of hellish creature im actually dealing with, i am left stewing it over in the boundless stretches of my imagination (which is only feeding my concerns and encouraging the involuntary twitching and itching!). DOUBLE UGH.
i have found them in a variety of spots, throughout my house: on my bedding, on the family room wall, on the bathroom and kitchen counters, etc; and i dont think these sightings have been limited to a specific time/season (though i could be wrong)…
please, please, PLEASE HELP!!!!!
Signature: ~still itchin & twitchin

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear still itchin & twitchin,
This is a Carpet Beetle Larva in the genus
Anthrenus, and it is a common, cosmopolitan household pest.  According to BugGuide: “larvae scavenge on accumulated fur, feathers, skin flakes, dead insects, etc. keratine- or chitin-rich materials; adults feed on pollen on flowers  Typical household products consumed include dry pet food, wool blankets/clothes, furs, and hair and skin flakes shed by people and pets and accumulated in the corners.”

Subject: Need help identifying bug!
Location: Chicagoland, IL
December 19, 2013 6:52 pm
I work at a library and we had a program the other evening where we made centerpieces out of live greenery. When one of the people pulled their greenery apart, they found this little guy/girl. I have no idea what kind of bug it is or what to do with it. I can’t turn it loose outside because of the wintery weather. Right now, I’ve got it in a jar with some of the greenery (juniper) it was crawling on. First, I’m wondering: what is it? Second, what should I do with it?
Signature: Librarian M

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Dear Librarian M,
This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and we are uncertain of the species.  We cannot even say with any certainty that it is a native species.  Where did the greenery come from?  If it came from a florist or wholesaler, it may be imported from a distant land.  You do not want to introduce a nonnative, potentially invasive species to Chicago, so we would encourage you not to release it.  You can try to keep it alive by keeping fresh greenery with it.  If it was found on a specific plant, chances are good that is a plant it feeds upon.  Stink Bugs have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids and most feed on the nutritious fluids they obtain from plants.

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Minneapolis, MN
December 19, 2013 4:11 pm
Found on this bottle of milk Today, 12/19/13
Signature: monicaz30

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Dear monicaz30,
This is a Big Legged Bug or Big Footed Bug in the genus
Acanthocephela, and though BugGuide does not note this behavior, we are speculating that like some other members of the family, it may enter homes as the weather begins to cool so it can hibernate.  The Big Legged Bug will not harm you or your home, though they may do some harm in the garden if they are plentiful.

Subject: Madagascar insect
Location: Madagascar
December 12, 2013 9:20 pm
Hi Daniel
My guide from my recent Madagascar trip just sent me this interesting photo that I wanted to send you. Sorry the quality isn’t great because I had to zoom in quite a bit. Would you have any idea? This is the only photo I have unfortunately. It doesn’t look like anything I’ve seen before.
Thanks,
Signature: David

I’m looking at this again Daniel and what I thought were two “fangs” may be one “fang” and one of the insects forelegs on the far side. As a result I’m guessing maybe assasin bug nymph?

Assassin Bug Nymph

Assassin Bug Nymph

Hi David,
We believe you are correct that this is an Assassin Bug nymph, but we would not entirely discount the possibility that this is a representative from some group of insects that we are not familiar with.  There are also some anatomical similarities to the wingless Snow Scorpionfly photos posted to the Craneflies of Pennsylvania website and the Bug Tracks site (scroll down to see).