From the daily archives: "Tuesday, December 10, 2013"

Subject: Moth
Location: Vero Beach Fl.
December 10, 2013 7:29 pm
Have seen two of these here in the last couple weeks.Are they rare.New to Florida so I’am seeing new things everyday.
Signature: Al

Streaked Sphinx

Streaked Sphinx

Dear Al,
Several years ago we would have claimed that sightings of the tropical Streaked Sphinx were relatively rare in Florida, but in recent years, perhaps due to global warming, sightings are becoming increasingly more frequent.

Subject: Insects with Eggs on Window
Location: Singapore, South East Asia
December 10, 2013 8:21 am
So I woke up one morning and found 6 small round dots on my window that look like eggs. There were 5 bugs altogether, 2 of them on the eggs and the other 3 around the eggs. The 3 were facing outwards like they are standing guard. They were extremely still except for an occassional movement in their feelers. I am dying to know what they are. The ”eggs” are still on my window.
Signature: J

Newly Hatched True Bugs

Newly Hatched True Bugs

Dear J,
These are newly hatched True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  Our best guess is that they are in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs.

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Malaysia
December 10, 2013 3:38 am
I found this weird-looking insect during my holiday in Malaysia. What is this? I think, this is possibly a type of mosquito.
Signature: Lanzz

What's That Bug???

Possibly Crane Fly

Dear Lanzz,
We have no idea what this insect is, but we do not believe it is a Mosquito.  Our best guess is a Crane Fly, but it is a very unusual Crane Fly.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply a comment with an answer.  We apologize, but our allotted time for research has expired and we have to head for work to give a final examination.

Erwin provides an interpretation
Subject: unknown Malaysian insect
December 11, 2013 3:12 am
Hi,
I would like to give an interpretation of the strange photo presented by Lanzz.
In my eyes there is a dead stick insect lying on the ground, with two legs missing. A tiny part of one of these missing legs can be seen near the insect. And I see another planarium-like creature or maybe a slug attached to the body of the stick insect and maybe feeding on it.
(I know my English is not 100% perfect, but I hope I can make myself understand)
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Close up showing hidden antennae

Close up showing hidden antennae

Update:  December 11, 2013
We are posting an enlarged view in response to Erwin’s comment.  In a lower resolution image, Erwin’s explanation seems possible, however, we took a vertical image of the insect on a wall and rotated it to maximize its size on our site.  The original file was reduced in resolution to be web compliant.  This appears to be a pair of wings held above the body.  At the right of the image, partially obscured by the leg, is the head with tiny antennae.  We do not believe this is a dead Stick Insect being eaten by a Planarium.  We are not certain that it is a Crane Fly, but we do believe it is a flying insect.

Subject: unkown bug
Location: Brigadoon Western Australia Perth
December 10, 2013 7:02 am
Hi,
I don’t know much about entoemology and generally find the answers to my questions of what’s that bug from my family and friends. This time however I’ve not managed to find an answer and google hasn’t yielded any results. I would very much like to know what this is so I can stop traipsing the internet for an answer.
Signature: thankyo uvery much Chez

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hi Chez,
Many years ago, we received a similar image that we identified as a Pie Dish Beetle, but it took us five more years to identify it to the species level.  We believe you have submitted an image of a Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle,
Helea perforata.

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

There are many more images online now than there were when we first were asked to identify this unusual Darkling Beetle, and now you can find great images on Friends of Queens Park Bushland where it states:  “Pie-dish beetles feed on dead and decaying plant material.  Pie-dish beetles lay their eggs in moist soil during summer and autumn, usually under clumps of rotting plant material, under which adults often shelter. Females of some species can lay up to 1,000 eggs during their life spans. The rate of egg production appears to be related to temperature. So is the time of hatching, which ranges from seven to fourteen days after the eggs were laid.
After hatching, the larvae can be found in loose clusters on the top of moist soil, dispersing as they develop. When fully grown, they burrow deeper into wetter soil where they build a circular pupal chamber and change into pupae. One to three weeks later, the adults emerge. At first they are soft and light brown, but they harden after about a week and the body becomes dark brown or black, the colour depending on the species. Soon after emergence, mating occurs and eggs develop three or four weeks later. Adult pie-dish beetles can be relatively long-lived (up to a year).”  Esperance Blog has an image of a mating pair of Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetles.  Your comprehensive views of the individual you encountered are an excellent addition to our photo archive.

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Hairy Backed Pie Dish Beetle

Yay!,
Thats an awesome name for a beetle and makes sense, we’ve recently built a compost bin by the house for our food scraps so I look forward to seeing more of these curious creatures wandering around the general area.
Thankyou very much
Chez

Subject: unknown
Location: Thailand, Bangkok
December 9, 2013 9:44 am
Can you help to work out what this is? It was approx 10cm long…. found in December. Is it harmful?
Signature: Gosia

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Hi Gosia,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not recognize the species.  Some species in the family represent significant agricultural pests.  The larvae are wood borers and most are very specific about which trees and shrubs they feed upon.  The beetles have strong mandibles and some might give a very painful nip if carelessly handled, but they are not venomous, and other than a bit of discomfort or possibly a bit of bleeding, they are not considered harmful to humans.

Erwin supplies an identification
Subject: Gosia’s cerambycid beetle from Thailand
December 10, 2013 9:34 am
Hi,
This is definitely a male of Xystrocera festiva Thompson, 1861 (the female having antennae not longer and mostly a little shorter than the body). This species is distributed from India to Indonesia (Java, Sumatra). It is indeed an acricultural pest, the larvae bore tunnels into several different plants like cacao tree or coffee plant.  Here you may read something about the life circle of this species:
http://www.cerambycoidea.com/titles/endangfarikhah2010.pdf
In Thailand anf Malaysia I saw this beetle rather often.
The only feature that does not fit is the length given by Gosia (“10 cm”), the normal body length is not more than 45 mm. Or maybe Gosia has measured the length including the antennae (if stretched forward).
Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thank you for providing an identification Erwin.  Your recent contributions and corrections to our site are greatly appreciated.  We at What’s That Bug? are thankful for the network of helpful and knowledgeable folks that comprise our readership.

Brilliant! J thanks a lot!
May be I slightly overestimated size but it looked HUGE J
Gosia