From the daily archives: "Monday, December 2, 2013"

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Jacksonville fl 32225
December 2, 2013 8:55 am
Hi, we found this bug in a coffin we were moving for a new business purchase, can you tell us what it is?
Signature: Sport Johnston

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Sport,
This is a Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter, a predatory aquatic True Bug that is capable of flying from one pond or water source to another.  We cannot fathom why it was in a coffin.

Subject: small insects larger than a flea but jump like fleas
Location: North DFW, TX
November 30, 2013 3:29 pm
Hello bugman,
I have scoured your site to try and find something similar to the bugs that cover my home and do their best to get inside. The closest thing I have come to in all your articles is the Springtail, however, no picture of a Springtail looks like the bugs I am having a problem with. I live in the Dallas, TX area and these bugs first appeared when it was about 85 degrees Fahrenheit outside. It has been cooling down lately with highs in the low 40’s and they’d seemed to have disappeared but today the high got just above 50 degrees and bam they are back. They are small bugs that jump, not fly. Although it appears that they have wings on their back they do not fly, they crawl rather slowly and jump from time to time. When they land, say on my arm, they may begin to crawl or may stay still but I can swat them or brush them off with little effort, they don’t even try to get out of the way, almost like they can’t see. They are also very fragile, if I try to b rush them off of a surface they just smush and smear instead of slide off the surface (including flat smooth surfaces like glass). They are small enough to fit through screens on a window but they then just seem content to chill out on the screen, not super active. They are however plentiful and when I open my sliding glass door on the back porch it seems that the breeze that occurs brings at least 5-10 in and they grab onto my clothes or the curtains or the inside of the door. I hope this helps.
Signature: Ross

Probably Leafhopper or Spittle Bug

Probably Leafhopper or Spittle Bug

Hi Ross,
We cannot make a definitive identification because of the lack of clarity and the poor quality of your photo, however, based on your description and the outline of the insect in the photo, we believe this is some type of Free Living Hemipteran, like a Leafhopper or Spittle Bug.  We have many native species, however, there are increasing numbers of invasive species that are being introduced from exotic lands, and once established, they have no natural enemies.  Many Leafhoppers and other Hemipterans are considered to be significant agricultural pests.

Subject: ear wig without pincers
Location: Portland Oregon usa
December 2, 2013 7:32 am
This morning I found a bug crawling very slowly near my child’s night light. It looked like an earwig at first but then I noticed it had no pincers. What is this thing? We live in Portland Oregon and my husband brings in firewood from outside so I wonder if this is where it came from.
In the picture He’s kinda squished (I squished him) wonder if he was walking so slow because he lost pincers?
Signature: Jessica

Termite

Termite

Hi Jessica,
This is a Termite, and because of the red head, we believe it is a Pacific Coast Dampwood Termite,
Zootermopsis angusticollis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  We believe it is highly likely it arrived with the firewood.

Subject: DAFUQ IS THIS BUG?!?!
Location: cyprus
December 2, 2013 7:17 am
about 6cm
Signature: NIKOLEXIS

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear NIKOLEXIS,
This Mole Cricket in the family Gryllotalpidae.  Except during the months from December through February, when we have an upsurge in identification requests from Australia because of the southern hemisphere summer, most of the mail we received comes from the United States of America.  We get Mole Cricket identification requests from all over the world, including Australia, Africa, North AmericaEurope and the Middle East, and though we cannot locate any submissions from South America, we are confident that Mole Crickets can also be found there.  They are subterranean dwellers that use their front legs to dig quickly through the soil.  Some species can fly and they are attracted to lights.   

Subject: oh my what is this?
Location: Queensland Australia
December 2, 2013 6:57 am
My toddler was bitten/stung by this critter tonight, her hand swelled instantly and she cried out as it hurt her. Unsure of what it is we are keeping a close eye on her tonight. Its approx 2.5cm long and has 6 legs. Any info you can give would be terrific.
Signature: ???

Assassin Bug Nymph

Assassin Bug Nymph

This is an Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, and it appears to be a nymph, possibly of the Common Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, that is pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website which indicates:  “Notice its strong and long mouth part, also know as Rostrum, is used for punch into their prey’s body and suck their juice. They will give a very painful bite, so don’t touch them.”  There is one genus of New World Assassin Bugs, Triatoma, known as Kissing Bugs or Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs.  They readily bite humans and they are known to spread Chagas Disease in Central America, South America and the southernmost portions of the American Southwest, and to the best of our knowledge, they are the only Assassin Bugs known to be harmful to humans, however, as your toddler experienced, the bite of an Assassin Bug can be quite painful.  There is tenderness and local swelling, but there should be no permanent harm due to the bite.  Many insects bite if carelessly handled, but with certain Assassin Bugs, we frequently get reports of unprovoked bites.