From the monthly archives: "November 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Indetification
Location: Tashkent, Uzbekistan
November 25, 2013 4:23 am
Hello! Recently I shot a bug that I have never seen before on my mobile phone.
Please help me to identify its type.
Thank you.
Signature: Sherzod Uuldashev

Unknown Longicorn

City Longhorned Beetle

Hello Sherzod,
We are unable at this time to provide you with a species identification, but we can assure you that the family Cerambycidae is correct for this unknown Longicorn beetle.

Hello Mr Daniel !
Thank you very much for your useful information.
And good luck in all your doings.
Sincerely
Sherzod YULDASHEV

Hi Daniel and Sherzod:
It looks like a City Longhorn Beetle, Aeolesthes sarta (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Cerambycini). Other common English names include Uzbek Longhorn Beetle and Sart Longhorn Beetle. This beetle appears to be on everyone’s radar as a potentially serious invasive threat to a wide variety of tree species. The European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization has posted an informative data sheet, as has the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS), in conjunction with Purdue University. The latter document provides a map that illustrates the predicted expansion of this beetle throughout most of Europe in response to climate change. According to the Ohio Department of Agriculture: “Aeolesthes sarta is known from India (Western Himalayas), Pakistan (north), Afghanistan, Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan (south), in mountainous areas up to an altitude of 2000 m. The region of origin of this insect is believed to be Pakistan and Western India. It has spread west into Afghanistan and Iran and north into the Central Asian countries where it was first found in the 1920s. This insect continues to increase its range in the Central Asian countries (Orlinski et al. 1991). It is not known to occur in North America but it has a high potential for establishment here due to climate and host availability.”  Regards.  Karl

Thank you Mr. Karl for your time spent on this Bug. It was very informative.
Sincerely
Sherzod YULDASHEV

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flax seed looking thing in bed
Location: Seattle, Wa
November 24, 2013 5:57 pm
I have found a few things that look like a flax seed on my bed the last week. I also found one beetle looking brown bug on my bed it had very short legs. Can you help me?
Signature: SMG

Plant Seed, we presume

Plant Seed, we presume

Dear SMG,
As your email indicates, this appears to be the seed of some plant, Flax or other.  It does not appear to us to be the egg of an insect.  The only insect egg we can think of that it even resembles is the egg of a Katydid, but we cannot fathom how a single Katydid Egg would find its way to your bed, so we are still leaning toward this being a plant seed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Lalibela, Ethiopia (NW)
November 24, 2013 7:24 am
Found this beauty while on a birding trip to Ethiopia, specifically, in a field outside the town of Lalibela, NW ETH This last month, Oct., ’13. Elevation ca. 5-6,000’
Can you tell me what it is?? I can’t seem to get it to paste into your image spots below (other than to give address on my computer, which is no help to you), so I uploaded it to a Picasa Web Album and the following address should get you to it. I’m anxious to know and to send the ID info to my local guide there, who is working on bird and insect ID.
Signature: Romney Bathurst

Hornworm from Ethiopia

Hornworm from Ethiopia

Dear Romney,
This is a Hornworm, a caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we will try to identify the species later today.  It reminds us of caterpillars in the genus
Hyles.

Wow, that was fast!!!  Thanks so much – will hold off sending info to Ethiopia to see if you can come up with anything more.  Regardless, I do so appreciate your help!  Isn’t it amazing how such gorgeous caterpillars often turn into the most drab moths.  On the other hand, of course, this guy blends very, very well with his background – once we put him down in a safe place, we could hardly find him again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantid eating a minnow
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
November 23, 2013 1:36 pm
I always bring some mantids in before a hard freeze and then put the oothecae outside to help ensure future generations(usually after mating, the first three ootheca will be fertile but none afterward). The females can get quite hungry after laying their ootheca and will gladly eat a minnow. I don’t think you’ll see that in the wild though 🙂
Signature: Ozzy

Mantid eats Minnow

Mantid eats Minnow

Hi Ozzy,
Thanks for sending us your photo of a Mantis eating a Minnow in captivity.  Your comment about the unlikeliness of seeing this in the wild struck a chord with us.  Just yesterday, while working in the yard, we thought about how man has affected the evolution of the creatures around us.  Often when we think of evolution, people get wrapped up in the origin of new species, but appearance and behavior of existing species also constitutes a type of evolution.  Since many insects, including many Mantids, only live a single season, it is possible to witness an evolutionary change during a single person’s life span.  If you continued to feed minnows to Mantids, and then included a bowl of water containing live minnows in your habitat, the Mantids might eventually learn to fish for those minnows.  Subsequent offspring might eventually carry the gene that includes the instinct to fish, and when those individuals are then released into the wild, they might eventually spawn a population of Fishing Mantids.  We realize this is a very far fetched scenario, however, we do believe that nurture affects nature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Chicago, IL
November 23, 2013 1:19 pm
We’ve seen a few of these in my home the last day or two. I have never seen it before, nor can I find it online. It’s about 3/8” long, and all of the legs are coming out of the front of his ”mouth” it seems. He seems to be dragging this big, bulbous green-brown body behind him.
Signature: Joan

Tick

Tick

Hi Joan,
This is a Tick, and it appears to be engorged with blood, indicating that it has recently fed.  Do you have a pet that goes outdoors?  This Tick might have gained access to your home by attaching to a pet outdoors, feeding on the blood of the pet and then dropping off the pet in your home.

Yes, thank you! I finally figured it out after searching, and I was really grossed out. I think it came from my dog.
Joan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: creepy bug
Location: santa barbara
November 22, 2013 10:39 pm
Hello,
I found this bug in my kitchen. I live in Santa Barbara Caliornia. Any idea on the type of bug this is?
Thanks,
Signature: LG

Earwig

Earwig

Dear LG,
This is an Earwig, and judging by the size of the cerci or pincers, this is a male.  Earwigs are basically harmless, though when they are numerous, they can do some damage in the garden, eating such things as rose buds.  According to BugGuide:  “Earwigs are sensitive to heat and dryness, so they usually hide in cool, dark places during the day and come out at night.  Some species hide mostly under leaves, rocks and other debris, while others hide under the bark of trees. An important habitat in the deserts of the southwest US is inside rotting cactus- one of the few places with constant moisture even in the driest parts of the year.  Winged species are often attracted to light at night.”  The name Earwig is allegedly derived from the Anglo-Saxon word earwicga, which according to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, refers to the notion that the Anglo-Saxons slept in sod huts with straw mattresses and “the warm and tight ear opening of a slumbering person might well have been a snug hiding place for these crevice-loving creatures.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination