From the monthly archives: "November 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Cary, Nc
Location: Cary, Nc
November 26, 2013 10:45 pm
I found this spider in my garage in Cary, Nc. It’s pattern on the legs kind of resemble an orb weaver yet it’s abdominal region does not (well at least any of the pictures I’ve been able to find on the web (pun definitely intended). I was just hoping u could help identify it. It was on November 26, 2013.
Signature: Louis Ridgway

Probably Pumpkin Spider

Probably Pumpkin Spider

Dear Louis,
You are correct that this is an Orbweaver.  We believe it is a Pumpkin Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red velvety winged bug
Location: Singapore
November 27, 2013 2:10 am
This bug flew into the office one day and is now our office pet. We have no idea what to feed it. Just trying with wet tissue and yeast paste. Thanks for helping!
Signature: Jacs

Net-Winged Beetle

Net-Winged Beetle

Dear Jacs,
This is a Net-Winged Beetle in the family Lycidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults eat nectar and honeydew. Larvae: Despite anecdotal reports of carnivory, most, if not all, feed on myxomycetes or metabolic products of fungi.”  Though you may desire to keep this lovely beetle in captivity, we feel it would be better to release it back into the wild to fend for itself.  We are unable to provide a species identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Baltimore, MD
November 26, 2013 4:53 pm
I am finding this spider/bug daily in my home. I would like to know what it is? If it is dangerous to my family? And how do I rid my home of it?
Signature: F Johnson

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear F Johnson,
This is a Camel Cricket, and they are generally found in damp, dark places like basements where they feed on a variety of organic matter including paper and fabric.  Though they may become a nuisance if they are plentiful, they are benign creatures that will not pose any danger to your family.  According to BugGuide:  “If these occur in a house the best treatment is to remove them and their breeding habitat – cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements. A clean dry home will not be a welcoming place for these guys. Although they are scary-looking they are basically harmless to humans, except perhaps for minor damage to stored items, and are easily discouraged by eliminating the dark damp habitat they prefer.”  With ocean levels rising due to global warming, inhabitants of coastal cities might find that it is getting increasingly difficult to keep basements from being overly damp, thus contributing to a rise in the populations of creatures that inhabit damp, dark environments.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biting bug causing allergic reaction
Location: Sydney, Australia
November 26, 2013 1:51 am
Hi there,
We live in Sydney, Australia and have just moved into a new apartment.
After an unusually warm winter, my wife and I were both bitten by some kind of bug.
Initially I thought it was fleas, as the bites were located around the ankles, elbows and stomach area.
My wife has had a severe allergic reaction, with her body itching all over and large areas of her thigs covered in spots.
I set up a basic trap (bowl of soapy water and desk lamp), but all I ’caught’ were these bugs. One looks like a fungus gnat, but unsure what the larvae are.
Can you help us?
Cheers
Signature: Eddie

Springtails

Springtails

Hi Eddie,
These are benign Springtails, and they are not responsible for the bites you are experiencing.

Thanks Daniel,
Very much appreciated!
So the search continues – something is still biting us…
Cheers
Eddie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Second stick bug? this fall
Location: Charlottesville, VA
November 25, 2013 3:01 pm
A few of these seem to show up in the oddest places in my house every late fall. And its always when its really cold out and I have to wait until mid day , when it warms up a bit, to put them out.
Signature: J

Assassin Bug Nymph

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear J,
This is an immature Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus.  Assassin Bugs are predators, and most Assassin Bugs, with the exception of the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs, are considered harmless, though they will bite if provoked.  Zelus Assassin Bugs tend to bite more often than most Assassin Bugs, but the bite, though painful, is considered harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant-like creature
Location: Costa Rica
November 24, 2013 9:15 pm
My sister had this fall on her neck while she was in bed in Costa Rica. Besides being the creepiest thing to fall on one’s neck while one is in bed, what is it?
Signature: Rob

Solifugid

Solifugid

Hi Rob,
This is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion.  They do not have venom and they are not considered dangerous, however, they have strong jaws and they might deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination