From the monthly archives: "November 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Millipede??
Location: Frederick County, Maryland
October 19, 2013 8:08 am
Hi. Saw this guy up on the rocks in the mountain – Frederick County Reservoir Area, Maryland. Friday, October 18, 2013. He was at least four inches long. Moving fairly fast …
Signature: photogirl

Worm Millipede

Worm Millipede

Dear photogirl,
We believe we have correctly identified your Millipede as a Worm Millipede AKA American Giant Millipede,
Narceus americanus-annularis-complex, which BugGuide describes as:  “Usually dark reddish-brown with red edges on each segment. The most commonly-seen large millipede in its range.”  We were searching through interesting, recent, unanswered requests so that we could postdate a few submissions to go live in early November while when we will be away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Asps / Flannel Moth caterpillars…interesting colors
Location: Kyle, Texas
October 29, 2013 10:40 am
Greetings from Kyle, Texas!
This past weekend one of my kids found one of these asps crawling across our porch. It was a buff color and the largest I had ever seen. I captured it in a jar and then gave my kids (and the neighbor kids who were also there) a lesson that these are stinging caterpillars (in the glass jar we could actually see the stingers which are close to the feet) and never to be picked up or played with. We looked it up here at WTB of course, so everybody was well versed on these cute untouchables.
Then, this morning my youngest child who is four, came in saying that he’d found another one and sure enough he had found the darker one on our garage, very close to our rose bushes. On closer inspection, I found the orange one actually on the rose bushes. We decided to remove them and take some photos because of the color variations and also because they are very large…the jar lid they are occupying in the pics are three inches in diameter. To keep them and my kids safe, I put them in our compost pile where I put the other one from Saturday.
Thank you so much for your wonderful site!
Signature: M. family in Kyle

Asps

Asps

Dear M. family,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo of the color variations in Asps, the stinging caterpillar of the Southern Flannel Moth.  We are happy to hear our site was helpful.  We are postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are out of the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: North Miami, Florida
October 27, 2013 12:27 pm
Hello,
Found this bug dead in my backyard and my yard has mysterious mounds of mud/ dirt about 1/2 ” all over. Want to know this bug and it is related to these mound on my lawn ?
Thanks for your help and time!
Signature: Jennifer

Rainbow Scarab

Rainbow Scarab

Hi Jennifer,
This is a female Dung Beetle known as a Rainbow Scarab.  Like other Dung Beetles, Rainbow Scarabs gather fresh fecal matter, roll it into a ball and bury it after laying an egg.  Dung Beetles often work in pairs and they often guard the young, continuing to feed the growing larvae with fresh dung.  We do not believe they are related to your mystery mud mounds.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are away from the office.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist with the mysterious mud mounds.

Mysterious Mud Mound

Mysterious Mud Mound

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUG
Location: SYDNEY AUSTRALIA
October 19, 2013 2:11 pm
I PHOTOGRAPHED THIS INSECT IN MY BACKYARD LAST SUMMER.
CAN YOU PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS STRANGE AND BEAUTIFUL INSECT.
I HAVE SEARCHED MANY SITES WITH NO RESULTS.
ITS ONLY SMALL NO MORE THEN 2CM HAS SMALL COLORFUL WINGS AND APPEARS FLIGHTLESS ONLY CRAWLS AND HOPS.
I HOPE YOU RECEIVE MY FILES
Signature: WHAT BUG IS IT

Female Bagworm Moth

Female Bagworm Moth

This is a flightless female Bagworm Moth, Cebysa leucotelus.  Your photos are excellent.  You can find additional information on Butterfly House.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are out of the office. 

Female Bagworm Moth

Female Bagworm Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Texas
October 29, 2013 2:07 pm
Found on an oak tree in central texas
Signature: Blake and Brianna

Duskywing Caterpillar

Duskywing Caterpillar

Hi Blake and Brianna,
This looks like a Skipper Caterpillar, more specifically, one of the Duskywings in the genus
Erynnis.  See BugGuide for some photos of the caterpillars.  According to the Butterflies Through Binoculars The West by Jeffrey Glassberg, Oak is a the food plant for the caterpillars of many of the species of Duskywings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant caterpillar like creature
Location: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
October 26, 2013 2:36 pm
Dear Bugman:
Any idea what this is? It’s about the size of an adult human’s index finger. It’s October 25th and three of them are clinging to a Virginia Creeper vine and the fourth is crawling along the top of a wall. This is in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.
Signature: David

Typhon Sphinx Caterpillar

Typhon Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi David,
Because of the prominent caudal bump that remains when the caudal horn that is prevalent in most Sphingidae Caterpillars, we deduced this caterpillar to be a member of the genus
Eumorpha.  We searched the representatives from the species on the Sphingidae of the Americas website, and quickly located a visual match with the Caterpillar of the Typhon Sphinx, Eumorpha typhon.  You may also see an image of the Caterpillar of the Typhon Sphinx on BugGuide.  The only food plant listed for the caterpillars is grape, but we have learned that many caterpillars that feed on grape will also eat Virginia Creeper.  We will be postdating your submission to go live during our absence from the office in early November.

Typhon Sphinx Caterpillar

Typhon Sphinx Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination