From the monthly archives: "November 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Furry Slug Fish
Location: Houston, TX
November 4, 2013 3:56 pm
This furry slug like animal was attached to our trash can outside. Texas (Houston ) Fall early November weather. The animal is about 2” long and about 1/4- 1/2 ” diameter. Furr is a greyish salt an pepper tan color with a tail that is fish shaped but consisting of Furr.
Signature: -stumped in Houston

Asp

Asp

Hi stumped in Houston,
This stinging Southern Flannel Moth Caterpillar is commonly called an Asp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dinosaur Cricket or what?
Location: Fayeteville, PA
November 5, 2013 10:19 am
Sir,
My picture’s don’t clearly show the black sparkly tar like oval (I call her ”eye”) on the back of her wings. We watched her lay eggs, maybe? 2nd picture (blurry – sorry – I was freaking out about being that close to her), shows some of the shiny ”eggs” (I’m assuming they are eggs) she put on the post. Do you know what this is? If you need more pictures, and can promise me this thing just looks mean (but very cool!), but really isn’t, I can take more. It moved to a log on the porch, and hasn’t moved for days. My guess, she is still there. I avoid bugs, but this thing is just too interesting to not try to find out what it is. First saw her on Halloween. We live at the top of a mountain, along Michaux State Forest, and now she does too.
She looks like a stink bug/cricket combo that I’ve nick named dinosaur cricket.
Thank you for any information you can provide!
Signature: Dana

Wheel Bug called Dinosaur Cricket

Wheel Bug called Dinosaur Cricket

Dear Dana,
We love that you have named this native, predatory Wheel Bug the Dinosaur Cricket.  Wheel Bugs are Assassin Bugs and they are in the same insect order as Stink BugsWheel Bug Eggs are laid in a regular, geometric mass that resembles barrels.

Thank you for your response! That is exactly what she is!! With this new information, I can get more pictures of her and her glistening black “eye” on her wings. She didn’t lay a whole lot of eggs, but I hope to see more wheel bugs in the future, so I will be watching her eggs in the spring.
I think this is the first time I’ve ever thought a bug was cool, and happy it was on my porch.
It is the closest thing to a “dinosaur” that I ever want to see.  🙂
Thank you again!
Respectfully,
Dana

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huntsman?
Location: Pretoria North
November 5, 2013 3:43 pm
Hi, I came home tonight to find a new addition to the family. From other photos I believe it is a Huntsman but would appreciate confirmation. This guy/lady quite liked posing for the camera and I was able to get a few nice photos with my phone.
Signature: Regards, Peter

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Peter,
In our opinion, this is a Wolf Spider.  They are considered harmless, though big individuals might bite if provoked.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A cluster of black and orange bugs in Western Australia
Location: Perth, Western Australia
November 5, 2013 7:27 pm
Hi there! I have been busy over the last year bringing my desolate (rental house) garden from a sand out to a lush garden with flowers and veggies. So far so good, and I am seeing lots of biodiversity now!
I found this cluster of bugs in the fence around my veggie patch this morning… I was hoping they are assassin bugs, but I can’t see any mouthparts. Any ideas?
Signature: Jess

Coreid Hatchlings

Holy Cross Bug Hatchlings

Dear Jess,
We quickly identified your Coreid Bug Hatchlings as Crusader Bugs or Holy Cross Bugs,
Mictis profana, thanks to the Brisbane Insect site.  They are plant sucking insects and the site states:  “The bugs feed on Acacia, Cassia and some other garden plants.”

Immature Holy Cross Bugs

Immature Holy Cross Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Location:  Virginia
November 3, 2013 11:04:41 AM PST
Dear Bugman,
My husband emailed me this photo of a bug he saw in our yard.  I’ve seen them too, but have no idea what they are.  Can you help us solve the mystery of the fuzzy wasp moth?
Thanks,
A new resident of Virginia

Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth

Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth

Dear new resident of Virginia,
Perhaps you didn’t take note of our featured Bug of the Month for November 2013, because if you had, you might have recognized your Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth, an invasive, exotic species first reported in Maryland in 2001 and first profiled on our site in 2005.  These moths attract attention because they fly in late October and November when few other insects are common.  To the best of our knowledge, the Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth,
Pryeria sinica, has only spread as far as Maryland and Virgina, though it is expected to expand its range as its preferred larval food plant, Euonymus, is regarded as a significant landscaping plant.  We just returned back to the office after a one week stay with family in Ohio, and we commented to the gardeners in our family that the prevalence of Euonymus in so many gardens might mean that the invasive Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth would have a plentiful food supply should its range extend further west.  The plants are now a vivid red color and you might check to see if you have any growing in your yard.  If there is a plentiful food supply for the caterpillars, populations can explode and adult moths can be quite numerous.  More information on the Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth can be found on Invasive Species of Concern in Maryland.  This is our first new posting upon returning to the office after our holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small brown bug like a lady bug
Location: Southeast region
October 27, 2013 11:30 am
I first noticed one of these bugs in my house on my couch. Then after taking my children outside to play, they were all over my kid’s plastic swingset. We live in Alabama surrounded by lots of undeveloped land. We have lived here for four years, and this is the first time I have noticed this bug. It is about the same size as a lady bug but not as round and it is a dark brown color. It also flies. What kind of bug is this and is it dangerous to my kids? Thanks!
Signature: Jennifer

Lablab Bug

Lablab Bug

Dear Jennifer,
The Lablab Bug is a recently introduced, exotic species that fees upon another exotic introduction, Kudzu.  We expect the Lablab Bugs will proliferate wherever Kudzu can be found.  Lablab Bugs are not dangerous to humans, but they are a nuisance when they are plentiful, which is nearly always.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination