From the monthly archives: "November 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: York Region Forest, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada
November 6, 2013 10:36 pm
Hello Bugman,
I would like to get some info on this caterpillar.
It was found in York Region forest, just half hours drive of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
It was searching on old decaying tree trunks in the parking lot when I first spied it, during the middle of October 2013. A few days later, I found a second one (may be same one) in the same location.
I took both photos, of which you may use for display purposes.
I have been searching many butterfly and moth categories, without any luck in naming it. Maybe (I’m thinking) its a sawfly? Its about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in length.
I have just started a website and trying to name the species that I have included on it.
Thanks for any info…
Brian

Pine Sawfly Larva

Pine Sawfly Larva

Dear Brian,
Just because it looks like a caterpillar and acts like a caterpillar, does not necessarily mean it is a caterpillar.  You are correct that this is a Sawfly Larva.  It is an Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva,
Diprion similis, and according to BugGuide, it is an adventive species introduced from Europe.  BugGuide also notes:  “Although a serious pest at times, it normally stunts rather than kills its hosts. It can be a more serious problem with young trees and in cases such as Christmas trees where appearance is important. It has natural enemies and diseases, so large outbreaks are only intermittently seen.”

Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva

Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your reply -to my request asking for identification,
regarding the bug that I had found – most informative. No wonder many of
the conifer trees in that area that it was found in, had issues with their
foliage etc.
Brian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Spider
Location: St. George Utah
November 6, 2013 12:34 pm
My Neighbor found this Spider on the outside wall of her home by their door and brought is over to out house in a container. she said that she was a Wood spider but I am not sure if she is. I have a hobby of photographing and I took quite a few pictures of her. my Neighbor Said that she was going to have some babies since she was fairly large But it is normal for spiders to be large. I would love to know what kind she is. thank you for your time!
I love all nature, bugs, animals, insect’s and so on.
Thank you.
Signature: Genevieve

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Genevieve,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the genus
Olios.  Spiders in this family do not build webs to snare prey, but rather hunt for prey during nocturnal rambles.

Giant Crab Spider

Giant Crab Spider

We believe it is entirely possible that this individual will lay eggs soon.

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp-like insect from Tampico
Location: Tampico, Mexico
November 3, 2013 8:10 am
My wife found this bug outside our garden. She insists it is a type of bee. I think it is some sort of fly that resembles a wasp for protective measures. Could you set the record straight?
This was found in Tampico, Tamaulipas Mexico. Near Gulf of Mexico coast.
Signature: Rexnatus

Wasp-Mimic Clearwing Moth

Texas Wasp Moth

Hi again Rexnatus,
These are gorgeous photos of a wasp-mimicking Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae.  We have examples of this family on our site, including
Horama plumipes and this still unidentified species we posted in 2007.  Maybe Karl will have some time to research this identification.

Unidentified Sesiid Moth from Mexico

Horama panthalon

Ed. Note:  November 7, 2013
Thanks to a comment from Rexnatus, we have corrected the classification and we can now provide the species name for
Horama panthalon, commonly called the Texas Wasp Moth on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth Genus Named for notorious Roman Emperor!!!
Subject: Moth from Japan
Location: Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
November 3, 2013 3:39 am
Dear Bugman,
Here is a photo of a beautiful moth that visited my school in Japan. It was found on November 1, 2013 in Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. It is quite furry and, I’m sure you will agree, has gorgeous markings. I tried to find a match online, but was unsuccessful.
Yours in curiosity,
Signature: Shaney

Saturniid Moth

Saturniid Moth

Subject: Moth identified!
Location: Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
November 3, 2013 4:14 am
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I just submitted a moth, but with the help of a friend, I think I figured out what it was.
Saturnia jonasii (a kind of Giant Silkworm Moth)
or in Japanese
hime yama mayu
(”Hime” means ”princess”, so I think that is a fitting name for this moth!)
Sorry to have bothered you!
Signature: Shaney

Giant Silkmoth

Giant Silkmoth

Dear Shaney,
It is no bother posting your beautiful photos of
Saturnia jonasii, but we do want to consult with Bill Oehlke, a specialist in Saturniids, to see if he can confirm your identification.  We do not feel confident making the call ourselves, but we do acknowledge the resemblance to the mounted Saturnia jonasii that is pictured on the Harmony Museum site.

Bill Oehlke confirms, and provides some food for thought!!!
Saturnia (Rinaca) jonasii also known as Caligula jonasii.

Thanks Bill,
We can’t help but to wonder who would name a genus after the most notorious Emperor of Rome.  This might demand a bit more research on our part. 
The name Caligula jonasii (Butler, 1877) is used on Lepidoptera.pro and on Global Biodiversity Information Facility.  Does the genus Caligula replace the genera Saturnia and Rinaca or was it later reclassified into Saturnia?  Any information on this is greatly welcomed.

Clarification courtesy of Bill Oehlke
Daniel,
As far as I know Saturnia is the correct and most recent genus placement and (Rinaca) is a subgenus of Saturnia. Whenever you see the second name capitalized and bordered by ( ) it is a subgenus.
There are several jonasii subspecies so this one is actually Saturnia (Rinaca) jonasii jonasii
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: West Central Ohio
October 18, 2013 5:13 pm
A friend in wsest Centeral Ohio shot this photo today Oct. 18, 2013. Can you tell me what it is?
Signature: Tammy Hiday

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi Tammy,
This is a Wheel Bug, and we have gotten countless identification requests for Wheel Bugs this fall.  Your letter will post live to our site in early November when we are out of the office visiting family in Ohio.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pumpkin Spider? McLean, Virginia
Location: On our McLean, Virginia home
November 1, 2013 10:57 pm
Dear Bugman,
We live 6 miles from the White House in McLean, VA. Rain and wind the day after Halloween toppled one of the grim reapers standing guard outside our front door, revealing the perfect holiday decoration ever: a big bright orange spider, touched with black here and there carrying what looked to be a large orange sac on its back!!!
After attaching a note to our house forbidding anyone to disturb our spider, I photographed the new arrival and continued with my post-Halloween errands. A few hours later, the spider’s sac was covered in some sort of fuzzy material. The spider ’s legs were barely visible under its body.
Fast forward to early evening and the fuzzy sac was no longer attached to the body of the spider, who remained close by possibly spinning a web.
Is our new housemate a pumpkin spider? Enquiring minds want to know!
Signature: Brook

Pumpkin Spider with Egg Sac

Pumpkin Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Brook,
Because of your thoughtfulness to provide a note forbidding anyone from disturbing your Pumpkin Spider, we are tagging your post with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We have a slightly different interpretation of your photos.  Your first image is of a female spider about to lay eggs and her body is swollen.  In the second image, the one we are posting, she has produced an egg sac and she is guarding it.  She will soon die and the egg sac will overwinter, hatching into several hundred spiderlings in the spring.

Bug Humanitarian Awardee:  Guarding a Pumpkin Spider and her Egg Sac

Bug Humanitarian Awardee: Guarding a Pumpkin Spider and her Egg Sac

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination