From the monthly archives: "October 2013"

Subject: Orange spider
Location: West Chester, PA
October 23, 2013 6:48 am
I saw this orange spider in a park in West Chester, Pennsylvania on October 22, 2013. I took the picture.
Signature: Lisa

Pumpkin Spider

Pumpkin Spider

Hi Lisa,
Your spider is a harmless Orbweaver, most likely the Marbled Orbweaver,
Araneus marmoreus, a species with highly variable coloration.  Many individuals are orange, and the spiders mature in the fall, right around Halloween, so they are frequently called Pumpkin Spiders.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Marbled Orbweaver.

Subject: mantid wasp?
Location: oliver, BC
October 23, 2013 11:26 am
Hello! I found this wasp-looking insect in early september amongst my wildflowers! I don’t think that i’ve ever noticed one before.
Signature: mikkel day

Mantispid

Mantispid

Hi mikkel,
This is a Mantispid or Mantidfly, and it is not even closely related to mantids or wasps.  It is classified with the Lacewings and Antlions as a Neuropteran.
  We have not had luck finding a visual species match.

Subject: What’s this spider?
Location: https://maps.google.co.kr/maps?hl=en&ll=34.294948,126.081762&spn=0.063889,0.13175&t=m&z=14
October 22, 2013 6:19 am
I shot this spider on the small island of Hajo-Do, at the far south-western edge of South Korea, in June or July 2011. From comparing it to images from google, it resembles a Wolf Spider, to my untrained eye, but I have also read reports that the Funnel Web Spider has somehow found its way here, and this spider had a funnel shaped web. (If it was the latter, I was courting disaster, as my hands were only a few cm away as I adjusted my lens…) So, I’ve supplied 2 photos – One from a little further back, showing the web, and a second, much closer, getting down to macro detail.
I’m a very keen macro shooter, and am especially crazy about bugs, although my knowledge of genus etc is very limited. Feel free to explore my blog posts on my macro work on insects, and any help with identifying them would be very much appreciated.
Relevant blog posts…
http://richarquis.blogspot.kr/2013/09/bongmu-bug-party.html
http://richarquis.blogspot.kr/2013/09/early-macro-work-with-sigma-105mm-f28.html
Signature: richarquis de sade

Spider from South Korea

Funnel Weaver from South Korea

Dear richarquis de sade,
We do not recognize your spider, and we do not have the time to research at this moment, so we are posting your excellent photos in the hope that one of our readers can provide a comment as to its identity.

Unknown Spider from South Korea

Funnel Weaver Spider from South Korea

Hi Daniel and richarquis de sade:
I believe your spider is a Funnel Weaver (Agelenidae), probably in the genus Allagelena. At least three species are native to Korea: A. opulenta, A. donggukensis and A. difficilis. All three species are highly variable in appearance but I did find several images posted by Daniel Ruyle of A. opulenta spiders from Japan that look very similar to richarquis de sade’s spider. Allagelena opulenta is native to China, Korea, Taiwan and Japan.  I tried to find out if it was considered dangerous to humans but my search was inconclusive. One site did indicate that its toxin is “insect-selective”, suggesting that it is probably not dangerous. However, I would probably not be inclined to test this if I was ever confronted with the opportunity. Agelenid spiders are sometimes referred to as Funnel Web spiders but they should not be confused with the very dangerous Australian Funnel Web spiders, most infamously the Sydney Funnel Web, which belong to a different spider family altogether, the Hexathelidae. Regards.  Karl

 

Subject: Identifying Insect
Location: Cheltenham VIC
October 23, 2013 4:17 am
Hi,
I found two of these beautiful insects in my backyard the other day. I googled them and it looks like the Orchid Dupe Wasp.
I have a curious 2 year old and I’m concerned about the enormous stinger they have. Are they particularly dangerous and could there be a nest around?
Thanks in advance 🙂
Signature: Alex

Orchid Dupe Wasp

Orchid Dupe Wasp

Dear Alex,
Congratulations on identifying your Orchid Dupe Wasp,
Lissopimpla excelsa, a species of parasitic Ichneumon from Australia.  What you have identified as a stinger is the ovipositor of the female, and wasps that sting are using a modified ovipositor.  Some Ichneumons are capable of stinging.  We will try to locate some more specific information for you.

Great. Thank you so much for the quick response. I look forward to hearing more info if you come across any.
Cheers
Alex

Subject: Cute Little Mantis?
Location: Central Texas
October 21, 2013 6:38 pm
Hey Bugman!
Its been years since I have submitted a request. You may not remember me, but I shared a spider love story with you 2006, I think it was.
Anyways, here is a new little guy I cant identify . I think it is a type of mantis, but cant find a similar photo online. Help?
Details: 2033 on 21 Oct 2013.
Central Texas in heavy mesquite brush location. This was outside my cabin in a mowed yard. Typical yard critters are my bunnies, tarantulas, really fat orb weavers, tarantula hawks, fire ants, walking sticks, translucent pink gecko things, and cute little preying mantises.
Signature: Critter Lover

Thread Legged Bug

Thread Legged Bug

Hi Critter Lover,
Is this your posting of courting Jumping Spiders?  It is easy to confuse this Thread Legged Bug in the subfamily Emesinae with a mantid because they both have raptorial front legs used to capture and hold prey while feeding.  Mantids chew food while Thread Legged Bugs, like other Assassin Bugs, suck the fluids from the prey.

Thread Legged Bug

Thread Legged Bug

Subject: Friend or foe?
Location: Southeastern Virginia
October 21, 2013 5:04 pm
I can’t tell if this bug does damage to my plants or to other pests or neither. I do seem to find them on plants that have damage especially cole crops and squash. The one in the picture was moved from the garden to the front of the shed so I could get a good photo.
Signature: Thanks! Rebecca

Harlequin Stink Bug

Harlequin Stink Bug

Hi Rebecca,
You probably want to consider the Harlequin Stink Bug as a foe.  The Harlequin Stink Bug uses its piercing and sucking mouthparts to take fluids from plants in the cabbage family, including kale.  If they are numerous, they may cause significant damage.