From the monthly archives: "October 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: thrips
October 25, 2013 8:39 pm
No info was provided on how we can get them out of our hair/head and to quit biting us.  I have already been to  emergency room for an infected bites and nothing I try has helped.  Many years ago (1984), we had an infestation in our home because of weeds on our acreage, and these tiny things blew threw the window screens.  It cost us over $300 in pest control, and in addition, we had to get rid of our carpeting, mattresses and sofas/chairs with fabric coverings.   Recently our Bexar county extension service identified my samples as “thrips” again.  Cattle need to be considered if pesticides are used on property where they eat/drink, as well as any other livestock.
Signature: Lonnie

Thrips photo from our archives

Thrips photo from our archives

Dear Lonnie,
We are sorry, but we haven’t any suggestions.  We do not really provide extermination advice.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide you with some assistance.

Thrips photograph from our archives

Thrips photograph from our archives

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of katydid is this?
Location: Central Ohio
October 24, 2013 3:55 pm
I took this picture of a katydid on my screen door. He was eating small insects. When I googled red-eyed katydid, the sites I found identified it as a red-eyed devil katydid. However, everything I’ve read on the Internet places them in Texas. I live in Ohio. Is this a different kind of katydid or is this a rare sighting?
He also occasionally rubbed his head with his foot, the way a cat does when it’s washing its face. Why would he do this?
Signature: Bug Friend

Common Meadow Katydid

Common Meadow Katydid

Dear Bug Friend,
You are correct that this is not a Red Eyed Devil.  We believe we have correctly identified it as one of the Greater Meadow Katydids, possibly a Common Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum vulgare, thanks to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “Rather small for an Orchelimum. Has a rather plain green face, not mottled like most others of its genus. Eyes red. Typically (?) long-winged. Has two black lines on “dorsal shield”. See Internet references for details on keying by cerci of male.” This Greater Meadow Katydid is actually a female, not a male.  The curved sickle-like ovipositor is the indication she is a female.  Katydids and other insects often groom their antennae to keep debris from interfering with their sensory abilities. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth in california
Location: riverside county california
October 27, 2013 7:09 am
This cute little moth lives in the san timoteo canyon stream bed. It is only around from late Sept through early November.
Signature: sue mc clure

Nevada Buck Moth

Nevada Buck Moth

Dear Sue,
This is a Buck Moth in the genus
Hemileuca, and we are nearly certain it is a Nevada Buck Moth, Hemileuca nevadensis, based on its color, markings and location of sighting.  Different species of Buck Moths are found throughout North America, and the common name is a reference to the flight time of the adults, which roughly coincides with deer hunting season in many parts of the country.  You can find additional information on the Nevada Buck Moth on BugGuide.  Though the following information from BugGuide refers to a different species of Buck Moth, we believe it also applies to your Nevada Buck Moth:  “Forewing and hindwing black with narrow white bands. Tip of abdomen red in males, black in females.  Said to fly rapidly at mid-day through oak forests. ”  Those do appear to be oak leaves on the ground in your photograph.

Nevada Buck Moth

Nevada Buck Moth

Wow! Thank you so much for getting back to me. Now I will enjoy my little Buckies all the more. They are hanging out not around Oak trees but Cottonwoods in the river bed. They have been very busy this last week- I am thinking perhaps they are laying eggs for next year’s crop. Thank you again for that very quick reply. I have been looking for an answer for 3 years now… I appreciate your time and expertise! sue

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green caterpillar
Location: 30 miles from charlottesville Va in mountains
October 26, 2013 5:35 pm
Need id. Cat on an aster in blue ridge mountains.. oct. 18 . Near charlottesville
VA. Cant find name in wagners or on web sites. Thx
Signature: nancy n

Unknown Caterpillar

Hitched Arches Caterpillar

Hi Nancy,
Since you indicated this caterpillar was feeding on Aster, we checked the species of Hooded Owlet Moths in the genus
Cucullia that are posted to BugGuide, but we could not find a match.  We hope one of our readers can assist in this identification.  Are you certain this is an aster?  There appear to bee seed pods on the plant and asters do not have seed pods.

Unknown Caterpillar

Hitched Arches Caterpillar

I often take cat off of host plant to get picture and then return it. We found 6 of them on six different aster plants tho.  I dont know which aster variety.  Keep looking please.  Ive looked at all my resources. N

IM SENDING A FEW MORE PICS OF MY MYSTERY ASTER MOUNTAIN CATERPILLAR….NANCY  NEWMAN

Unknown Caterpillar on Aster

Melanchra adjuncta Caterpillar on Aster

Hi again Nancy,
We have added your additional photos to the posting.

Unknown Caterpillar on Aster

Hitched Arches Caterpillar on Aster

Hitched Arches identification courtesy of a comment by Frankie
Thanks Frankie,
You are absolutely right. The Hitched Arches is the perfect match based on the photos posted to BugGuide. We are going to update the posting thanks to your carefully researched comment.

Thanks to all of you who identified the Hitched Arches caterpillar for me.   What an amazing job you do!
N Newman
Nnature642

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whats this bug?
Location: Refrigerator and freezer
October 26, 2013 8:53 pm
Hello,
I just signed the lease of my new apartment (10/25/2013) and started moving in (10/26/2013). I typically do a thorough cleaning from top to bottom of any new place I move into. When I went to the kitchen to clean I opened the refrigerator and saw what looked like fried rice or pieces of brown rice sticking to the top and a few were on the bottom. I opened the freezer and there were a few in there as well. These bugs were not moving so I assumed that it was just that, perhaps old food left behind so I got the cleaning supplies and went to work. Once I finished, I placed a pack of bottled water in the refrigerator, shut the door and continued to clean the rest of the apartment. An hour or two I came back to grab a bottle of water and these ”brown rice” looking bugs were back!! a few were on my pack of bottled water and at the bottom of the frige again. DISGUSTING!! The refrigerator is kinda old and has some rust on the inside in some places. I also noticed th e refrigerator does not get that cold at all Im extremely pissed and will be heading to the rental office first thing Monday morning!!!! What are your thoughts on what this could be?
Signature: as professional as possible

Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator

Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator

Dear asap,
Your photos are quite blurry and we cannot make an exact identification due to the poor quality, however, we suspect you may have Carpet Beetle Larvae.  Our second guess would be Fly Puparia.

Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle

Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascar insect
Location: Madagascar
October 27, 2013 5:08 am
Hi Daniel.
I’m just back from Madagascar and the variety of insects is amazing. Usually I can kinda guess the general category of what I’m looking at but a few Madagascar insects have me stumped including the attached. I begin to wonder is it really an insect at all. It was moving along the ground very slowly in a squirming manner like a snake. It made no attempt to fly as we got closer to it.
Thanks,
David.
Signature: David

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi David,
We always think of Madagascar as Ground Zero for exotic specimens, so we were amused to see your attached images of a Mole Cricket.  While the representative of the genus in Madagascar might be a unique, indigenous species, Mole Crickets are found all over the world.  In the last week we have posted letters with a Mole Cricket from Spain and one of a Mole Cricket from Australia.  Other relatively recent examples include a Mole Cricket from South Africa, a Mole Cricket from France, a Mole Cricket from India, a Mole Cricket from Iraq and countless examples of Mole Crickets from North America.  Mole Crickets live underground and they use their front legs, which your photograph beautifully illustrates, to tunnel quickly through the soil.  We hope you have other nice exotica to send our way from Madagascar.

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination