From the monthly archives: "October 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I give up.
Location: Central Florida east coast
October 1, 2013 6:42 am
Found this big guy hanging from the ceiling of our front porch this morning. His body is 3-4 inches long and he’s bigger than my hand including his legs.
Signature: Timid Guy

Conehead

Conehead

Dear Timid Guy,
This is one of the Conehead Katydids in the tribe Copiphorini which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Raspy Cricket?
Location: Southern Oregon
September 28, 2013 8:49 pm
Just a few photos of three different bugs. My dog was digging in the Ivy and then a few minutes later these three bugs emerged….all different, but similar. I snapped a few photos of them just before he ate two of them. He does that.
They look like some sort of katydid/cricket….maybe a raspy cricket?
Signature: 🙂 Valerie

Shield-Backed Katydid: Idiostatus species

Shield-Backed Katydid: Idiostatus species

Hi Valerie,
All three of your insects are Longhorned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera, and we believe all are also classified as Katydids.  We believe we have identified one of your photos as a Shield-Backed Katydid in the genus
Idiostatus based on photos posted to BugGuide.  This genus is found in Oregon, California and neighboring states.  We haven’t the time to identify the other two images at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist.

Possibly Steindachner's Shieldback

Possibly Steindachner’s Shieldback

As we were preparing to hit post, we decided to do a bit more sleuthing, and we believe we have identified a Steindachner’s Shieldback, Neduba steindachneri, as well, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The BugGuide image is of a female with a long ovipositor.  Your individual is a male.  Your final image might be a Mormon Cricket or other member of the genus Anabrus.  There are also nice images of Anabrus species on BugGuide.  Katydids are a good source of nourishment.

Possibly Female Mormon Cricket

Possibly Female Mormon Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unkonwn green-abdomen spider
Location: Central Russia
September 29, 2013 5:20 am
Hi! Would you be so kind to take a look and identify?
Signature: Alexander

Unknown Spider

Crab Spider

Hi Alexander,
We do not recognize this beautiful spider and we have not had any luck finding a matching image on the internet.  We can tell you that this is a male based on the developed pedipalps.  We suspect this is an Orbweaver, or perhaps a Crab Spider.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Unknown Spider

Crab Spider

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Alexander:
It does look like a Crab Spider (family Thomisidae), probably Ebrechtella tricuspidata. It also goes by the synonym Misumenops tricuspidata. Either way, it is the single species in the genus. It is widely distributed, eastern and southern Europe to China, but is apparently uncommon throughout its range.  Several web sites refer to it as the Triangle Crab Spider, but given its range it may have other common names as well. Regards.  Karl

Welcome back Karl, and thanks for the identification.  We were wondering if cooler weather and shorter daylight hours might be providing you with additional time to research some of our unidentified species.

Thank you very much!
You’re doing great job!
Sincerely,
Alexander Ivanov
http://ZooBot.ru

Update from Karl:  October 21, 2013
Hi Daniel. We are still pretty busy here but you are right about the cooler weather and (hopefully) more free time being on its way. Actually, the main reason you haven’t been seeing much from me recently is that we have been having huge issues with internet connectivity. We moved back to the country a few years ago and unfortunately our property is in some kind of cyber dead zone. This summer has been particularly bad, with internet connectivity and speed ranging from poor to non-existent. However, I believe we may have finally defeated all the problems and things are running rather smoothly at this time (fingers crossed). Also, you and your growing flock of helpful readers aren’t leaving many unresolved mysteries anymore. I enjoy seeing the increased interaction and participation. In my spare time I have been working steadily to identify and catalogue all the insect pictures (and spiders, etc.) that I have taken over the years but it has been a slow grind. Not being able to access the internet doesn’t help. I if I ever get caught up it will probably be years from now, but I hope to have a substantial number uploaded to my photo site over the next few months. Good luck and keep up the great work.  Karl

Hi Karl,
Your input is always greatly appreciated.  Please send us a link to your photo site when it is ready for more public consumption.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hundreds of these red guys!!!
Location: Sand Springs,OK
September 30, 2013 3:20 pm
I am really curious to know what these red/ black bugs are. They came back again this year in the same spot. Hundreds of them out by out mailbox.
Signature: The Browns

Red Shoulder Bug Aggregation

Red Shoulder Bug Aggregation

Dear The Browns,
This is an aggregation of Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma.  The nymphs have the red bodies and the adults are the black winged individuals with red shoulder patches.  According to BugGuide, they are found in:  “Yards, gardens, riparian areas, and other areas in association with hostplants. Often found in large aggregations feeding on leaking tree sap, dead insects, or seeds that have fallen from trees overhead. Also forms aggregations in winter to hibernate, often in association with human residences.” 

Aggregation of Red Shouldered Bugs

Aggregation of Red Shouldered Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug? a beetle? some kind of wasp moth?
Location: Debary FLorida
September 30, 2013 5:51 pm
HI! I am going nuts trying to find what that bug is…I took a picture of at the Gemini Springs park in Debary Florida.
Signature: Bugging

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

This is a magnificent photo of a Large Milkweed Bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, preparing for flight.  When resting, the wings cover the abdomen.  Large Milkweed Bugs are True Bugs in the Seed Bug family.  We did find a photo on BugGuide that is similar, but not as nice as your photo.

Thank you kindly for finding about this bug and for the compliment about the photo. I love nature and I may have to pick your brain again soon!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Great Lakes, IL
September 30, 2013 2:54 pm
This moth was on the steps outside of our building at the Great Lakes Naval Base about halfway between Chicago and Milwaukee. It was huge (almost the size of a small hand). Can you tell us what species it is?
Signature: John

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Hi John,
You can tell this Polyphemus Moth is a male because of his well developed antennae.  We hope you had an opportunity to view him with his wings lying flat because then you would understand where he got his name.  There is a large eyespot in the center of each lower wing, and though the moth has two eyespots, one on each side, it was still named for the monocular cyclops from Greek mythology, Polyphemus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination