From the monthly archives: "October 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another Madagascar Katydid
Location: Madagascar
October 30, 2013 7:07 am
Hi again Daniel
As promised I’m attaching another interesting Katydid from Madagascar. Location is the same as the previous specimen. Enjoy.
Regards,
David.
Signature: David

Katydid

Katydid

Hi again David,
Thanks for sending us another Katydid from Madagascar.  This individual is a female.  We will again contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a species identification.  We hope to have all updates done today as we will be away from the office for a week beginning tomorrow.  Since we postdated your previous submission, we are going to change the date so it will go live now and the link will be active.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is either Odontolakis or Centrocephalus (Concephalinae: Agraeciini), but likely an undescribed species. I have collected a very similar looking species in Ranomafana.
Cheers,
Piotr

November 7, 2013
Hi Daniel
I have another few Katydids from Madagascar that I’d like to send through to you but I realise you’re just back from your break and I don’t want to overwhelm you while you clear your backlog. Would it be ok if I sent through another ID request to yourself and Piotr this week? If not I will wait another week before sending anything through. I was very excited to see Piotr’s comment that my last submission was an undescribed species.
Hope you had a good rest,
Best regards,
David.

Hi David,
Please wait for the weekend.  Our backlog is significant, but gainful employment demands are far greater.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: October bug
Location: Pasadena Maryland
October 29, 2013 9:02 pm
Hello,
Every October we get a bunch of the bugs in the files below. They live only in one bush in our yard and lay eggs in the light strands I use for halloween. Would you be able to help me identify them?
Thanks!!
Signature: Carrie

Euonymus Leaf Notcher

Euonymus Leaf Notcher

Hi Carrie,
This moth is appropriately colored for Halloween.  We quickly identified it on BugGuide as a Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth,
Pryeria sinica, and we learned that it is an invasive species.  Since Euonymus is a common shrub used in landscaping, we expect that this species may begin to spread to other states, though right now it is only reported from Maryland and Virginia.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced from Asia; first found in MD and VA in 2001; it is spreading.”  Maryland Department of Agriculture lists it as an Invasive Species of Concern in Maryland.  There is an October 2004 update which states:  “Pryeria moths are expected to emerge in November. MDA is attempting to delimit the populations of this emerging pest. Marylanders are asked to contact Dick Bean at MDA (410) 841-2743 if you see pupae now, or moths in late October/November.”  That number might still be valid and we would suggest that you contact the MDA.  Control is probably most effective with the larvae.  Since its emergence is timely and since it is a species of concern, we are featuring your submissions as our Bug of the Month for November 2013.  Thank you for allowing us to provide a valuable public service announcement to notify people of this invasive species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water Striders
Location: Tucquan Glen, Lancaster County PA
October 29, 2013 10:36 am
Hi Daniel!
I read your comment about wishing you had more photographs of water striders. I attached a few shots that I took several weeks ago at Tucquan Glen in Lancaster County PA.
There are two shots of an adult with prey and a group of young individuals. They were not easy to photograph due to their constant motion.
Melody McFarland
Lancaster PA
Signature: Melody McFarland

Water Strider

Water Strider

Hi Melody,
Thanks so much for supplying some additional photos of Water Striders in the family Gerridae for our site.  We see from the metadata on the digital image that your photos were taken on September 26, 2013.  It appears that the adults do not have wings, so we thought they might be nymphs as well, but your individuals resemble this photo from BugGuide of a member of the genus
Trepobates which BugGuide indicates:  “Superficially resembles nymphs of Gerris. First antennomere shorter than three others combined.”  Water Striders are perfectly adapted for skating across the surface of the water, and according to BugGuide:  “fine water-repellant hairs on the underside of the tarsi allow the bug to walk on water’s surface; only the mid- and the hind legs are used for locomotion; they are attached to large coxae connected to the sides of the thorax and are unfit for walking on land.”

Water Striders

Water Striders

Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to distinguish one species from another or even to definitively determine the correct genus, so our identification might be incorrect.  Your photos which illustrate the feeding habits are a marvelous addition to our archive.

Water Strider

Water Strider

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascar Bush Cricket
Location: Madagascar
October 27, 2013 7:21 am
Hi Daniel
Thought you might be interested in this beautiful bush cricket that I encountered recently on a night walk at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park, Madagascar.
David.
Signature: David

Female Katydid

Female Katydid:  Aethiomerus adelphus

Hi David,
Could you please direct us to the place where you identified your Bush Crickets, because we believe these to be Katydids in the family Tettigoniidae.  You also imply that there is only one individual in the photos, when in fact you have photographed a pair.  The female has the long ovipositor.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he is able to provide a species name for us.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are away from the office.

Male Katydid

Male Katydid:  Aethiomerus adelphus

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
These are Aethiomerus, almost certainly A. adelphus (Conocephalinae: Agraeciini). Do you have the exact locality data for these photos? I would love to add them to my distribution database.
Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Hi Daniel
I always thought that the terms Bush Cricket and Katydid were interchangeable and Katydid was an American term and Bush cricket a more general term. Please correct me. I am probably completely wrong. 🙂
For Piotr the exact locality is Analamazoatra Reserve on the edge of Antasibe-Mantadia National forest in Madagascar. The exact Google GPS coordinates are -18.942214,48.416913. I will have more Madagascar Katydids for Piotr if he is interested.
Regards,
David.

Thanks David,
We have seen the term Bush Cricket, but it seems it is generally applied to flightless Katydids.  Thanks for the additional information.

Update:  October 30, 2013
This was originally planned to be a posting to go live during our absence, but since we need to link to it because of another submission, we are posting it earlier than originally planned.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Katydid
Location: Languedoc, South France
October 28, 2013 10:20 am
I used to come across a similar looking insect when I lived in South Africa that we called a Katydid. Saw this one recently in the South of France and wondered if it was the same species
Signature: Curious

Saddle Backed Bush Cricket

Saddle-Backed Bushcricket

Dear Curious,
You are correct.  This is a Katydid.  It appears to be a Saddle-Backed Bushcricket,
Ephippiger ephippiger, and you may verify our identification on Orthoptera Species File.  According to Piotr Naskrecki, a Katydid expert, there are ” two or three very similar species are also known from Provence.”  What you saw in South Africa was most likely a distant relative.

Thanks for your reply, I wonder if it’s possible that when vines were taken out by French immigrants in the late 15th century the insects could have gone with the cuttings and what we saw in South Africa was possibly directly related to the insects from here, albeit be it a few generations later.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in my pitcher plant
Location: Altadena, CA
October 27, 2013 8:00 pm
I found this guy in my pitcher plant (Sarracenia leucophylla). I don’t normally rescue bugs that fall into my plants’ mouths, traps or dew. However, after listening to this poor guy scratch to get out for three days, I took some pictures then tipped the plant over so he could escape. It took him about three seconds to get out of the plant. He took another three seconds to flip himself over then he flew away. I know these bugs are quite common because I have a collection of three dead ones I have found over the summer. Please can you give me the common and scientific name of this beautiful beetle?
Thanks!
Signature: Dawg Mom

Scarab Beetle trapped in Pitcher Plant

Scarab Beetle trapped in Pitcher Plant

Dear Dawg Mom,
The best we are able to provide from this angle of view is a family ID.  This is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination