From the monthly archives: "October 2013"

Subject: Large black beetle looking?
Location: Central New Jersey
October 22, 2013 5:25 am
I’ve seen this bug earlier in the year during summer i believe but just noticed them more and more. I think its the same bug that eats my dogs poop and lives in the ground. Gross! What is it?
Signature: Jimbo

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Jimbo,
This is an Oil Beetle, one of the Blister Beetles in the genus
Meloe.  To the best of our knowledge, they do not eat fecal matter.  We believe you are confusing it with a Dung Beetle.

Subject: Large beetle husk
Location: Jackson, WY
October 21, 2013 10:07 am
Hi Bugman! Love this website… Last Fall I found this beetle husk (empty shell) in Jackson, Wyoming – elevation approximately 6,400’. I believe it could fly, as it looks like it has wings. The actual body, not including antenna, was about 3” long, which is unusually large for this region. I have included photos of the top & bottom of the beetle. Your identification help would be greatly appreciated, as I am including an illustration of it in a book that I am working on about Jackson Hole. Thanks in advance.
Signature: Angela B.

Root Borer Corpse

Root Borer Corpse

Hi Angela,
These are the remains of a Root Borer in the genus
Prionus.  Here is a living specimen, also from Wyoming, that is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Ohio
October 21, 2013 2:07 pm
Can’t find this insect anywhere.
It looks like a long lightening bug with very intricate design on the wings.
Signature: Rob

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Hi Rob,
This is an Ailanthus Webworm Moth,
Atteva punctella, a native Ermine Moth that has expanded its original range because its caterpillar adapted to eating leaves of the invasive, exotic Ailanthus or Tree of Heaven.  Sadly, the caterpillars will never do enough damage to the tree to help control the spread of that noxious weed species throughout the civilized world.

Subject: White Caterpillar NO black spots
Location: Lake Jordan, North Carolina – mid- October
October 20, 2013 2:33 pm
Hi Bugman,
My husband and I were hiking around Jordan Lake near Raleigh, North Carolina this fine mid-October afternoon and this little guy hitched a ride on his jeans. I’ve been trying to identify him but I cannot find a picture online that doesn’t have black spots and does have black feathery things! He didn’t have black spots on his back so I don’t think he’s a Hickory Tussock, but we’d love to know what he is (and if we’re going to break out in a rash!)!
Thanks!
Signature: Bree – North Carolina

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Bree,
We believe this is a Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota tessellaris, which we initially identified on the Field Biology in Southeastern Ohio website, and we then confirmed with this matching photo on BugGuide.  Also known as the Pale Tussock Moth or Pale Tiger Moth, this species does have considerably variation in the coloration of the caterpillar, according to BugGuide.

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Banded Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Subject: bugs
Location: broken bow, oklahoma
October 21, 2013 6:35 am
I found this bug outside my garage window. I trapped it in a glass bowl. After taking a photo I let it go. I have not been able to find out what it is and I was hoping you could.
Signature: Christian Tyler Short

American Pelecinid

American Pelecinid

Hi Christian,
This is a very excellent photo for identification purposes.  This is a female American Pelecinid, a parasitic wasp that pushes its long abdomen into the ground to lay eggs on the grubs of Scarab Beetles.  The beetle grub provides food for the developing American Pelecinid larva.

Subject: Caterpillar found in Hong Kong
Location: Shatin, Hong Kong
October 20, 2013 7:02 pm
Dear Bugman,
I saw this caterpillar crossing a path on my way to the station in Shatin, Hong Kong, It was in a wooded area, mid-October, about 8am. The caterpillar was about 3 inches long and moving quite fast. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks for your help!
Signature: Bridget

Unknown Hornworm

Unknown Hornworm

Dear Bridget,
The best we can do at this time is to provide you with a family identification.  This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Our quick search did not produce any matching species images, and this is a very large family.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide something more specific.

Psilogramma increta identification courtesy of Bostjan
See Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic for additional information.  We love the piebald look of some individuals.