What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s on The Tongue?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
September 18, 2013 3:38 pm
Hi Daniel,
I saw a bee on the bird bath today and was lucky enough to have my camera with me. Can you tell me what those odd gold colored things are on it’s proboscis? It sat there for quite some time ”cleaning” it with its front feet.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Honey Bee with Milkweed Pollinia

Honey Bee with Milkweed Pollinium

Hi Anna,
We believe this might be the pollinium or pollen sac of a milkweed.  We know you grow milkweed.  See Nadia’s Yard and scroll down the milkweed page to see milkweed pollina attached to a honey bee.  We first learned of Milkweed Pollinia from Julian Donahue who commented on a Orchid Bee posting.  Your photos are positively gorgeous.

Honey Bee and Milkweed Pollinium

Honey Bee and Milkweed Pollinium

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for clearing that one up for me, and for the compliment.  I’m enjoying the new camera.  Finally went from a point & shoot to a DSLR.  It makes a huge difference!
Anna

Hi again Anna,
While we believe that the camera is only as good as the photographer, we also believe that photographers should have the best equipment for their needs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Hawthorne, CA

15 Responses to Honey Bee with Milkweed Pollinium, we believe

  1. Denise Power says:

    Comment for Anna Carreon or details on how to contact her. I’m the production manager for 5m publishing and we’re about to publish a book called Managing Bee Health and the author would like to use this picture in the book. Can you grant permission to use the picture? We can use the credit line: Courtesy of Anna Carreon, featured on whatsthatbug.com

    Thanks
    Denise

    • bugman says:

      We will contact Anna and have her respond to your comment.

    • Anna Carreon says:

      Hello Denise,

      I’d be happy to give you permission to use my photo and can also send you the high resolution version of the file if you provide me with an email address. Thank you for your interest, it’s quite an ego booster!

      Thank you for facilitating, Daniel.

      Anna

  2. Dr John Carr says:

    Hi Anna
    Thanks for letting us use the great picture of the bee and milkweed great picture. It will be great to show other vets, advisors and other bee keepers this as an issue for our bees!

    John

    • bugman says:

      You are most welcome, but we are curious why it is an issue for the bee keepers. We did not realize the pollinium had a negative impact on the Honey Bees.

    • Anna Carreon says:

      Dr. John Carr,

      I apologize for not having responded to your comment nor to Denise Power’s comment below until now. I am also curious, as is the bugman, as to why pollinium is an issue for the bee keepers. Would you please give us some detail when you have the time? I will email Denise the high resolution files straight away and thank you for the interest in my photographs and for the compliment.

      Anna

      Thank you,
      Anna

  3. Denise Power says:

    Hi Anna

    Thanks so much! It’s such a great picture. My email is denise.power@5mpublishing.com

  4. Anna Carreon says:

    Denise,

    I have emailed you two photos. I hope the format meets your requirements for publication. If not, please let me know via email and I will resend. Thank you again!

    Anna

  5. Denise Power says:

    This is great – thanks Anna!

  6. Anna Carreon says:

    You’re welcome, Denise. Do you think you might be able to send me a copy of the book once it is published?

    Anna

  7. Dr John Carr says:

    Hi Anna
    I will see what I can do once the book is published – you need to send an email to my email address with a postal address.

    The issue is that some bees can get tangled and ensnared with the pollinia and not be able to release the double from their bodies. Normally other works come to help.

    John

    • bugman says:

      How nice to hear that the worker Honey Bees assist one another. I watched a drama one day after releasing a female California Mantis that was found on the garage. I put her on the basil plant and within seconds she caught a Honey Bee. I couldn’t believe that another Honey Bee started to hover nearby, watching her hive mate getting eaten. I guess she was assessing the futility of providing aid.

  8. Anna Carreon says:

    Dr. John Carr,

    I have Denise’s email address but not yours. The Bugman does not publish them here at his website. If I send my physical address to her, will she be able to get it to you?

    Anna

  9. Dr John Carr says:

    Hi
    My email address is swineunit1@yahoo.com – I do pigs as well.
    Yes honey bees are fascinating how they will help each other – and there is some evidence it is full sisters first and then the other sisters in the hive (note the queen was mated by 20 drones) so how they even recognise full sisters!. But propolis cannot be removed by the collecting bee it has to be removed by other workers.

    • bugman says:

      Thanks so much for the explanation, and the information about full sisters is especially fascinating.

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