From the monthly archives: "August 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Which Wasp?
Location: Long Island, NY
August 26, 2013 3:51 pm
I could not identify this one here or at BugGuide.
A little more help, please?
Signature: Carl

Blue Mud Wasp

Blue Mud Wasp

Hi Carl,
We believe this is a Blue Mud Wasp, Chalybion californicum, but we are not certain.  We will try to get a second opinion.  See BugGuide for photos of the Blue Mud Wasp.  The iridescence of the wings is only visible in your second photo.

Blue Mud Wasp

Blue Mud Wasp

Eric Eaton provides an identification:  Male Great Black Wasp
I’d say a male Great Black Wasp, Sphex pensylvanicus.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: not the main subject
Location: Jordan Lake NC
August 26, 2013 5:57 pm
Dear Bugman, I found the most beautiful Imperial Moth today..and I noticed while photographing the Moth, that a medium sized spider was tucked into a crack on the gas station wall. The back was ivory white..with some blackish design. I was very fortunate to see this Imperial…but the Spider was a nice extra treat!
Signature: Mary S

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Hi Mary,
The dark markings indicate that this is a male Imperial Moth, and he is a lovely specimen.  Your spider is some species of Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Angry Caterpillar/Worm
Location: Middletown, MD
August 26, 2013 6:33 am
Good morning!
My aunt took a picture of this caterpillar that she was attempting to rescue from the middle of a mid-Maryland road. Apparently it became quite aggressive, whipping around and shooting ”gunk” out of its sides. It’s hard to tell size from the pic, but she said it was as long as her hand from longest finger to wrist (and she has long hands). It also had horns all over its body. She said it was similar to the tomato eating caterpillars, but much larger and much more active/aggressive.
Signature: Thank you!! – chadrenne

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear Chadrenne,
We always look forward to the first Hickory Horned Devil images of the year with mixed feelings as it is a signal of the end of summer.  The Hickory Horned Devil is likely the largest North American caterpillar, and despite its fearsome appearance and its aggressive behavior, it is perfectly harmless.  People have written comparing Hickory Horned Devils to Chinese dragons in the past, and that is a very understandable comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: India
August 25, 2013 6:01 pm
I want to know about this creature..
Signature: Self

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear Self,
This is a Fruit Piercing Moth,
Eudocima materna, and we found matching photos on FlickR and Wikimedia Commons.  The moths have a proboscis that is capable of piercing the skin of many types of fruit, enabling the moth to feed on the juice.  This habit ensures them a position as an agricultural pest in many parts of the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow jacket or hoverfly?
Location: Long Island, NY
August 25, 2013 8:43 pm
I don’t see a wasp waist so I’m guessing fly.
Signature: Carl

Hover Fly:  Spilomyia longicornis

Hover Fly: Spilomyia longicornis

Hi Carl,
Your Hover Fly or Flower Fly,
Spilomyia longicornis, is a very effective Yellowjacket mimic.  You can also compare your image to photographs posted to BugGuide.

Many thanks!
I plan a photo exhibit in the spring so I’d like to get my educational info right…
c

Good luck with the exhibit Carl.  This is a lovely photo.  We imagine it looks fantastic at a higher resolution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
August 25, 2013
After lamenting for years that we are unable to photograph the Western Tiger Swallowtails that visit our garden, but rarely land, we got lucky for the second time this year.  This somewhat tattered individual repeatedly landed on the California Black Walnut as well as a Lilac.  Last month we photographed a Western Tiger Swallowtail, possibly the same individual, on a Live Oak.  There was a second individual soaring in the yard today, and this individual, the more aggressive of the two, chased the other away.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination