From the monthly archives: "August 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Eastern Amberwing
Location: Sarasota, FL
July 25, 2013 9:00 am
Hey,
I caught a rare glimpse of a gorgeous female Eastern Amberwing perched on my lanai!! I’ve included a couple of pictures here, I’ve got some very nice close ups if you want them, I’ll be happy to send them since I’m sure the site reduces pictures a lot. When I first saw it from across my lanai, I thought it was a wasp, here in this part of Florida, wasps look very similar at a glance. It wasn’t moving, and a closer look made me suspect it was possibly getting ready to lay eggs. Very pretty!!
Thanks, love the site!!
Signature: Michelle

Eastern Amberwing

Female Eastern Amberwing

Dear Michelle,
Thank you for sending your lovely photos of a female Eastern Amberwing,
Perithemis tenera, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism that is also pictured on BugGuide.  Clicking on the photos on our site will enlarge the image in a new window.

Female Eastern Amberwing

Female Eastern Amberwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tomato worm?
Location: Eastlake ohio
July 26, 2013 6:32 pm
What are these? I’m thinking maybe a tomato worm
Signature: Kristy

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Hi Kristi,
Tomato Hornworms would be found feeding on the leaves of tomatoes and related plants.  This Cecropia Moth Caterpillar is feeding on the leaves of a tree, possibly wild cherry, which is a listed food plant on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A few bugs
Location: Chicago, Il
July 24, 2013 2:57 pm
Hi! Can you help me figure out what these bugs are? The first picture is a little black bug I found in my bathroom. He pretended to be dead when I picked him up to put him outside. The second one I found during a walk. I live in Chicago. Both were found this month. Thanks!!!
Signature: Sarah T

Milkweed Longhorn

Milkweed Longhorn

Hi Sarah,
The beetle you found on your walk is a Milkweed Longhorn in the genus
Tetraopes.  Your other beetle is a Spider Beetle and they infest stored foods, so check out the pantry and stored pet food for a possible infestation.  Milkweed Longhorns are strongly associated with milkweed plants which provide food for both the adults and larvae.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on leaves of milkweed (Asclepias); larvae feed externally on roots of host (root feeding is unique among Lamiinae). Each species (or subspecies) is associated with one or a few species of Asclepias (an example of coevolution) (Farrell & Mitter 1998).”  We believe your Milkweed Longhorn is the  Red Milkweed Beetle, Tetraopes tetrophthalmus, based on photos posted to BugGuide.  Because we want to draw more attention to habitat loss and the importance of the biodiversity associated with native milkweed plants, we have selected your submission as the Bug of the Month for August 2013, and the posting will go live to our site on August 1.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed visitor
Location: Chicago Area
July 27, 2013 8:35 am
I live just outside of the Chicago area and had this visitor at my milkweed in the beginning of July. This bug was a fast mover and didn’t stick around too long. I have just never seen anything like it. Just curious and would appreciate help! Thanks so much!
Signature: Gina Parks

Squash Vine Borer

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Gina,
These are marvelous action photos of a Squash Vine Borer,
Melittia cucurbitae, a moth that is a very effective wasp mimic.  Normally we get photos of them with squash plants as the female lays eggs on the plants and the larvae bore in the stems of squash and related plants, including cucumbers.  You can read more about the Squash Vine Borer on BugGuide.

Squash Vine Borer

Squash Vine Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination