From the monthly archives: "July 2013"

Subject: Lack of Images
Website:
July 26, 2013 12:57 pm
I must say that the new design is not user-friendly.  I type, for example, “small yellow bug” into the search field and only links come up.  I then have to click on every link to see an image.  Find myself using your site less and less.  So sorry to complain.  Anna Carreon
Signature: Anna Carreon

Monarch Caterpillar by Anna

Monarch Caterpillar by Anna

Dear Anna,
We are really sorry to hear that as you have been such a faithful contributor over the years.  We will bring this to the attention of our webmaster to see if we can return to the former way the search engine worked.  Our editorial staff doesn’t particularly like the way the search engine is currently working either, and we have taken to using google and selecting images after typing in what we want to find, followed by “whatsthatbug.com” if we want to search our own archives.  Again, thanks so much for your input and we will try to remedy this problem.

UPDATE:  July 27, 2013
We just learned the problem has been corrected.  Images are once again appearing when using the search engine.

Subject: Brilliant Colored Beetles
Location: 2 miles west of Olathe Kansas @ 27465 W 143RD ST
July 26, 2013 10:47 am
I found this pair of mating beetles on some milkweed adjacent to my flower bed at my home in Olathe KS. I was unable to identify it in either of my reference books. The attached picture is magnified to show some extra detail. The larger of the two beetles is approximately 8 millimeters in length and about 4 millimeters wide. I did not observe either of the two feeding although they were found on a small species of milkweed. Can you help with identification?
Signature: Mike Lewis

Dogbane Leaf Beetles

Dogbane Leaf Beetles

Hi Mike,
These are Dogbane Leaf Beetles,
Chrysochus auratus, and they are frequently found feeding upon the leaves of Milkweed.  They really do have lovely metallic colors.

Thanks, I have a Kaufman Field Guide and a National Wildlife Federation Field Guide. Both show color closeups of the Dogbane Leaf beetle and even after looking at both references I was unable to come up with that ID on my own. Thanks very much. ><}}}”>

Subject: Moth
Location: Ontario
July 26, 2013 9:38 am
Sorry about this again. I want to know what this is type of moth and you can post this website.
Signature: M.0

Bedstraw Hawkmoth

Bedstraw Hawkmoth

Dear M.o,
This is a Gallium Sphinx or Bedstraw Hawkmoth, Hyles gallii.  You can read more about the Bedstraw Hawkmoth on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Subject: 3rd and 4th instar Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillars
Location: Southern Illinois
July 25, 2013 10:19 pm
I think these guys are 3rd and 4th instar Snowberry Clearwing caterpillars. Judging from the overall size at about an inch an a half, head-capsule size, and coloration.
Found both of them on the same honeysuckle vine out in the swamp today.
Signature: -Bert

Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillar:  Third Instar

Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillar: Third Instar

Hi Bert,
Thank you for submitting your excellent photos of Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillars for our archives.  It is interesting how caterpillars change their markings and colors as they molt and grow.

Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillar:  Fourth Instar

Snowberry Clearwing Caterpillar: Fourth Instar

Subject: Green & Black Beetle
Location: near Golfito Costa Rica
July 26, 2013 5:11 am
Hello Bugman,
This green and black beetle would show up off and on during our recent visit to Costa Rica. I found it quite striking. In a few picture it has a crab-like bug attached to it. Do you know more about these two.
Thanks!
Signature: Ocho Verde Wildlife

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

This colorful beetle is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  The wings are used to make jewelry by many indigenous groups in South America and modern jewely designers have continued that tradition.  We are sorry, we haven’t the time right now to research the species.  The hitchhiker is a Pseudoscorpion.  Pseudoscorpions often hitch rides on winged insects, and quite possibly on birds as well.  This advantageous means of transportation is known as Phoresy.

Phoresy:  Jewel Beetle transports Pseudoscorpion

Phoresy: Jewel Beetle transports Pseudoscorpion

Subject: Gorgeous primeval alien bug
Location: North Dakota
July 24, 2013 10:31 pm
Hey there!
I’ve submitted in the past – a fishing spider with her babies – and since then, I’ve gotten into insect and arachnid photography in a major way. (I even have a Bug Love album inspired by that section of your site!) Sadly, my shot of the intriguing bug we found this July evening isn’t particularly artistic – I snapped it quickly after my younger brother dashed past the intimidating little creature and hid in the house. I’m getting pretty good at identifying many of the insects around my house in North Dakota, but to be honest, I’m kind of at a loss here. Everyone I’ve talked to seems agreed that it’s probably some kind of cricket, resembling a house cricket in some ways, but the spikes on the hind legs seem unusually large! Can you help me out?
Thanks so much for your time, for the past identification, and for the site! It’s a major source of inspiration and joy for me.
Signature: Amanda

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Amanda,
This is a Camel Cricket or Cave Cricket in the family
Rhaphidophoridae, and the arched back that is so distinctive is not visible in this dorsal view.  A lateral view of a Camel Cricket reveals this feature.  Camel Crickets are generally found in dark and damp locations. You can read more about Camel Crickets on BugGuide.