From the monthly archives: "July 2013"

Subject: What kind of beetle?
Location: Bisbee, Az
July 5, 2013 11:28 am
I found this big guy (or gal) on it’s back at the gas station and brought it home to give it a drink of water and a safe location. It literally appeared to drink for about 30 min. and perked up quite a bit afterwards. I was online trying to I.D. it when I found your site which I’m really grateful for because I’m totally fascinated by bugs & now have a resource for looking them up. I haven’t seen this type of beetle here before. We just started our monsoon season and this is the 2nd type of lg. beetle I’ve seen. I was wondering what it was & what it eats, so I took these photos to send you . They’re a little fuzzy, I don’t have close-up lens. It has a small set of pincers but didn’t act aggressive or try to pinch anything. It mainly just wanted to hide somewhere. Thank you so much for your time and wonderful website ….. I really appreciate it! Janet p.s. I’m really glad you don&#821 7;t endorse extermination!!
Signature: Talks with Bugs

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Hi Janet,
This appears to be a Palo Verde Root
Borer, Derobrachus hovorei, a species that is common in Arizona.  Here is a photo from BugGuide for comparison.  Adults are attracted to lights, so that probably explains why it was discovered at a gas station.  More information is available on BugGuide where it states:  “Larvae feed on roots of paloverde trees (Parkinsonia spp.).”  The Palo Verde Grub Fact Sheet for Kids states:  “Adult beetles may take nectar ar feed on fruit.”

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Thank you Daniel. I do believe you are correct.  I’ve lived in Az 30 years, in Phoenix and south and I’ve never seen one before. Does the Palo Verde Root Borer Grub damage or ever kill the Palo Verde?  Janet

Hello again Janet,
From what we understand, Palo Verde Root Borers do not kill the trees they feed upon.  We suspect that if the Borers are especially numerous, if the tree is already distressed and/or if the weather conditions are especially harsh, the damage might result in significant harm to the trees.

Subject: Painted Lichen Moth
Location: St. Peters Village, PA, USA
July 4, 2013 8:09 pm
I was able to identify this little stunner with a simple Google search, but I just had to share because he was such an impressive little specimen. He was a striking red with rich grey stripes that didn’t blur or blend at the edges at all. He was so bright that at first I though someone had lost a fishing lure. I found him on July 4th in southeastern Pennsylvania just sitting on the side of a boulder on a very hot and humid day. I hope you enjoy!
Signature: JKay

Painted Lichen Moth

Painted Lichen Moth

Dear JKay,
Thank you for sending your photo of a Painted Lichen Moth,
Hypoprepia fucosa.  That appears to be lichen in your photograph, so we suspect this might be a female laying eggs since according to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on lichen, algae, and moss on trees.”  

Subject: Small Scorpion? In Ohio? On my work bench? Creepy!
Location: 41.256194,-83.006687
July 5, 2013 5:23 pm
Hey! I spied this little guy when working outdoors on my portable workbench. About a quarter of an inch long. Looks to me like a whiptail scorpion but no whip?
Signature: Tony Schacher

Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion

Hi Tony,
Like Scorpions and Whipscorpions it resembles, this Pseudoscorpion is an Arachnid, but unlike Scorpions, it does not have any venom.  Pseudoscorpions are found in many parts of the world.  They are perfectly harmless predators and they do not get much larger than the individual you encountered.

Upon seeing my photo upload on facebook my Daughter identified it as a chernetid, or “pseudoscorpion”

Subject: bumble bee
Location: NYS, Orange County
July 5, 2013 11:54 am
Dear Bugman,
I tried to ID this bumble bee but am not sure. It was the only bright yellow bee among the others on my lavender..so I took this pic but it was hard to get a clear one. Do you have any idea which it is?
Signature: klavierabend

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee

Dear klavierabend,
Based on the coloration and pattern on your bee, we believe this is a Yellow Fronted Bumble Bee,
Bombus flavifrons, a species we posted exactly a month ago.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “Widely distributed in US and Canada.” 

Many thanks for your work!!!
K

Subject: beetle with sunflower seeds for wings!
Location: portland OR
July 4, 2013 2:39 pm
was walking out of a shop in North Portland and saw this little guy. think it’s a June bug. your thoughts?
Signature: rob

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear Rob,
This is a very nice image of a Ten Lined June Beetle, a species found in the western portion of North America.  This is our featured Bug of the Month for July, but alas, our scrolling feature bar is not correctly displaying the posts we want to feature and we need to determine why this technical glitch has occurred.

 

Subject: ★Sphodros rufipes ★
Location: Manorville NY
July 4, 2013 3:19 pm
Hey… I live on Long Island NY.. And spotted this guy on my property… I never saw one before so I took a picture and left it alone… I looked it up and it seems to be an interesting spider so I’m just sharing… I think its a pretty good picture…
Signature: Annette Ray

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Hi Annette,
Thank you so much for sending us your photo of a Red Legged Purseweb Spider,
Sphodros rufipes.  Ever since we first learned about the Red Legged Purseweb Spider in 2003 and we discovered them to be an endangered species, we have been a champion for their preservation.