From the monthly archives: "June 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who is this?
Location: Brewster, NY
June 26, 2013 1:06 pm
A horde of these critters attacked my lilies, which I just discovered this morning (June 26). All the leaves were gnawed off, all the buds chewed into. I found zillions of these guys on the stems and buds. Of course they just fly off if I try to get them as I’m removing the dead plants. But they just moved next door to my stella doras, staging on the mum plants between the destroyed lilies and the stella doras.
I can’t find this in any of my bug books. Can you tell what it is? Is there anything much I could do about it? Obviously they love the lily family, but would they likely move on to other plants if these were not available?
Signature: Sister CG

Lily Leaf Beetle

Lily Leaf Beetle

Dear Sister CG,
This is a Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii, and it is an introduced species that has not made friends with gardeners who cultivate lilies.  You can read more about Lily Leaf Beetles on Gardener’s Supply Company.

Ah-HA! Thank you so much for this quick reply. I’m off to research possible treatments for this. We have a fully organic farm here, and the affected lilies are already goners for this year, so I’m thinking vinegar/water/soap to begin with. We’ll see.
Again, thanks so much for the help! (And no, this gardener is not in the mood to make friends with these guys either, pretty as they are.)
Catherine Grace, CHS
Bluestone Farm and Living Arts Center

We hope you are able to find an eco-friendly means of eradicating this invasive, exotic species from your farm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red water strider
Location: Bradys Lake, Monroe county, NE PA
June 26, 2013 4:47 pm
Water strider found in a freshwater swampy lake in northeastern PA today 6-26-13. Never saw a red one. Our common one is Gerris, which are black ( and larger) but we never saw a red one. This one is about 3/4 the size of a an adult Gerris.
Signature: Barb in PA

Water Strider

Water Strider

Hi Barb,
When we read your subject line and saw the thumbnail attachment, we suspected a phoretic mite colony on the Water Strider, but upon enlarging the photo, that does not appear to be the case.  We don’t know why this Water Strider is red, but it does not seem typical.  The lack of wings indicates this is an immature specimen, hence its smaller size.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A couple curious bugs
Location: Camden, South Carolina
June 26, 2013 6:29 am
Hello! I found the fly outside my work on a window, it had metallic eyes and wasn’t too happy about flash. I was thinking drone fly, but then I started looking up pictures and that didn’t seem right.
The second bug I believe to be some sort of aphid? I found it on my squash, after noticing holes in the leaves. It’s absolutely adorable though with its fluffy little tail. I think I’ll share 😛
Signature: Veronica Roma

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Hi Veronica,
This is a photo of a very impressive female Horse Fly.  The space between the eyes identifies her as a female.  Female Horse Flies are the blood sucking biters.  Males feed on fruit juices and do not bite.  Your Horse Fly looks like it might be
Tabanus fulvulus based on photos posted to BugGuide.  The other insect looks like an immature Plant Hopper which places it in the same order as Aphids.  Plant Hoppers do not chew holes in leaves, but they do suck fluids from plants and many are considered to be agricultural pests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this!!!
Location: Georgia
June 26, 2013 7:24 am
This is from GA just taken yesterday (6/25/13) right outside of Atlanta
Signature: Thank you

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

This is a moth commonly called a Spotted Apatelodes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large 2” beatle
Location: Fairmont, West Virgina
June 25, 2013 8:27 pm
I saw some of these last year around the same time ( June, July). I see them around an old rotting stump with their tail ends in the air, or just running along the ground. I live in northern West Virginia and thought they may be hardwood stump boring beetles, but I didn’t think we had them this far north. They are probably the biggest beetles I have seen in person. Is that what these are, and are they supposed to be this far north?
Signature: Lee

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Hi Lee,
This is a female Broad-Necked Root Borer, Prionus laticollis.  The reason you have seen them around an old stump is that the larvae are borers.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are inserted into ground (or under litter) in groups. Larvae tunnel downward to feed on living roots of a variety of trees and shrubs. At first they may feed on bark, but then proceed to hollow out small roots. Pupation occurs in spring, about 10 cm under the ground. Life cycle probably three years.”  BugGuide reports sightings as far north as Maine and they are also found in Canada, so your West Virginia sighting is not unusual.

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Stripey Beetle
Location: Carmel Valley, CA
June 25, 2013 10:50 pm
Hello – this cute fella was hanging on my screen at 10:30pm and seems to have had a lucky escape as there was spider web on one foot. About an inch long, white and green striped beetle with brown ”really cute” face. Very mellow and gentlemenly.
Thanks much!!
Signature: Kimberly

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear Kimberly,
This impressive beetle is a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata, a large Scarab Beetle that is found throughout much of western North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on tree foliage; larvae feed on roots of shrubs/trees.”  Adults which fly during midsummer are attracted to lights and they make a squeaking sound known as stridulation when they are handled.  Even though the common name indicates they are found in June and your specimen was found in June, and even though the subfamily they belong to, Melolonthinae, is commonly referred to as May Beetles, we have selected your submission as the Bug of the Month for July 2013 since they are most commonly sighted in July.

Thank you so much as I really enjoyed him and now learning about him. Honored to be the Bug of the Month!!  You have a very cool site.

Comment:  July 24, 2013 12:13 pm
I’m so happy to have found your website!  Thank you for making the Polyphylla decemlineata your July Bug of the Month.  We have one of these delightful fellows in our backyard and his behavior is quite baffeling.  We find him on his back every day or so, and think he must be dead.  Then later in the day or the next we seem him walking about.  Do they sleep on their backs?  We jostled him a bit one day, thinking he was dead, and his legs wiggled.  We turned him over and he walked away.?…
Signature: Natalie

Hi Natalie,
We aren’t certain why you keep finding Ten Lined June Beetles on their back, but sometimes beetles fall that way and it takes them some time to right themselves.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination