From the monthly archives: "June 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aussietrev Wattle Chafer
Location: Queensland, Australia
June 27, 2013 6:59 pm
Hi guys,
seeing some impressive longicorns posted here lately and thought you may like these shots of our Australian Wattle Chafer. This beautiful beetle is one of three similar species that dine on the bark of young wattle trees. Wattles are a member of the legume family and act as a pioneer species helping regeneration in cleared areas. The beetles do little harm and don’t appear to have any long term effect on the tree. I hope I haven’t sent them to you before, senility might be setting in if I have.
Signature: aussietrev

Wattle Chafer

Wattle Chafer

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for sending us your gorgeous photos of a Wattle Chafer.  We are surmising that these photos were taken during the southern hemisphere summer in December or January.  We have been getting some impressive Longicorn photos, and we expect many more thoughout the summer.  We have always believed that having a bad memory left room for new thoughts.

Wattle Chafer

Wattle Chafer

We were unable to locate any Wattle Chafers so we searched the family Cerambycidae from Australia and found an image of Penthea pardalis on Csiro.  That led us to the Acacia Longicorn on the Brisbane Insect website.  We have always considered Chafers to be Scarabs, not Longicorns. 

Penthea pardalis

Penthea pardalis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a question – a blue moth from Ecuador
Location: Ecuador, Amazon basin, Napo, Cuyabeno
June 27, 2013 2:36 pm
Dear Colleague,
I would like to ask you as expert on moths some enthomology information. In the attachment I sent you the photo of the tropical blue moth from Ecuador, Amazon basin, Napo Province, Cuyabeno. Can you help me, please, with the exact determination?
Thank you very much for your kind help.
Cordially,
Veronika P.
Signature: Veronika

Unknown Blue Moth

Unknown Blue Pyralid Moth

Dear Veronika,
We decided to check the quantity of email that arrived today prior to going to sleep, and we are posting your photo, but we will not begin to attempt to identify your blue moth until we awake.

Update:  Possibly Blue Tiger
Hi again Veronika.  Your moth resembles the Blue Tiger,
Hypocrita plagifera, pictured on the Learn About Butterflies website.  While it is not identical, it does look close enough to be related, which would mean it might be classed with the Tiger Moths in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We will contact Julian Donahue to see if he can provide any information.

Julian Donahue provides a correction:
It’s a pyralid! And there are bushels of colorful ones in the Neotropics.
Julian

Dear Daniel,
thank you very much for your useful information, I am very glad. Originally, I found also the photo of Hypocrita plagifera on the website some time ago. But  since the graphics on the wings is not the same as I was not sure.
I am grateful for your help. I think it is not necessary to give this photo on the website. I would like to ask you to remove the photo of the blue moth from the web.
Thanks so much for your time and help :o)!
Cordially,
Veronika

With all due respect Veronika, we will not remove your photo from our website.  You used our standard form which has a disclaimer that all photos and information submitted might be posted on our site.  We spent considerable time doing research and formatting your photo and email for the web.  We contacted an expert who provided a family identification for your Pyralid Moth.  We did this all free of charge as a public service for you.  Your photo will remain live in our archives.

Thanks so much for your good news, Daniel, I am very pleased that my photo of the moth with blue wings was included in this nice form in your valuable entomological archive. Fingers crossed your virtuous activities :o)!
Veronika P.

Thank you Veronika,
Now that we have a family Pyralidae for your moth, we might be able to get a genus or species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?!
Location: United Kingdom
June 27, 2013 2:18 am
Found in the UK, Summer. Looks very similar to a crane fly (daddy long legs), but it’s larger, and black/yellow!
Signature: Cory

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Cory,
This actually is a Crane Fly.  We cannot say for certain that it is  
Nephrotoma crocata which is pictured on Diptera Info, but it is very similar looking.

Thank you for you reply, I didn’t think I’d get one, but much appreciated!
Regards,
Cory.

Update:  June 2, 2018
Based on this new submission, we are now doubting our original species identification for this posting.  Based on images posted to Eakring Birds and on Diptera Info, we now believe this Crane Fly might be Ctenophora pectinicornis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in pei
Location: Summerside pei Canada
June 26, 2013 4:31 pm
I found this beetle while I was working yesterday, it was roughly the size of a quarter, I live in pei Canada
Signature: Thanks

Earth Boring Scarab

Earth Boring Scarab

You are most welcome.  We believe this is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, quite possibly Geotrupes semiopacus which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Ugly Bug
Location: Central to Easter Ohio, very warm bedroom
June 26, 2013 10:41 am
I was wondering if you could identify a beetle like bug for me.
It is very beetle like. It has antennae that are at least twice as long as it’s body. 6 legs. When I poke at it, it does not fly. Not flat like a cockroach. Grayish to brown. Very slow moving. About an inch to 2 inches long.
Thank you in advance!
Signature: Shawna Arthur

Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

Dear Shawna,
This is a Sawyer in the genus
Monochamus, and we think he is rather beautiful.  Male Sawyers like most other Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae have antennae considerably longer than the females of the species.  Take a close look at his thorax.  Those are Phoretic Mites which hitchhike on the Sawyer, using the beetle’s ability to fly to transport them to a new location and hopefully a more plentiful food supply.  See BugGuide for additional information on Sawyers in the genus Monochamus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Annual Sand Wasp visit to What’s That Bug? office garden
June 22, 2013
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

So, last Saturday a Western Tiger Swallowtail was cruising around the garden and we have tried unsuccessfully for years to get a decent photo of this nearly daily summer visitor.  Seems they fly around, but rarely land.  Well, the Western Tiger Swallowtail was nectaring from the Rudbeckia daisies, but by the time we returned with the camera, it had flown off.  We contented ourselves with photographing these lovely Sand Wasps in the genus Bembix.  Any wasp that preys upon flies is fine in our book.  According to BugGuide:  “Females provision their nest with flies which the larvae feed on (a single developing larva may eat more than twenty flies)” and “Provisioning is progressive. The females provide a greater number of prey over subsequent days during larval growth. Adults are excellent diggers and can disappear below the surface of loose sand within seconds.”

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination