From the monthly archives: "June 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

We will be away on holiday for ten days and we will not be responding to any of your numerous submissions and identification requests until we return.  We expect much backlog at that time and our already overworked staff might not be able to respond to your requests during that period.  Please use our archives and attempt to identify your creatures using our excellent search engine.  We hope we are lucky enough to see a Luna Moth on our trip.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Update:  June 12, 2013
We have returned from holiday, and though we did not get to see any Luna Moths or any Fireflies, we did see several Red Spotted Purples, arguably one of the loveliest North American Butterflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautifully patterned sphinx moth
Location: New Braunfels, Texas
May 31, 2013 4:19 pm
I came across this beautifully patterned sphinx moth-I am not sure what species- at work today. I love sphinx moths because of their often spectacular wing patterns and their willingness to be still for photos. If you can provide me with a species ID that’s be great although I am gunna post to bugguide as well. I hope you enjoy the photo. Sorry the quality isn’t the greatest. I had only my phone with me. Thanks again for a wonderful service!
Signature: Michael

Vine Sphinx

Vine Sphinx

Hi Michael,
Since you are also posting to BugGuide, you probably already know that this is a Vine Sphinx,
Eumorpha vitis, which we identified on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  Once things are posted to BugGuide, there is a large network of folks who can assist.  Our tiny editorial staff does all postings to our site, so we have fewer examples of each species. We see that BugGuide has already provided your answer. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Promethea Moth Buglove!
Location: Northeast Pennsylvania
May 31, 2013 11:49 pm
Hi Bugman,
Here is a snapshot of some Promethea Moths lovin’ on my porch. The female had camped out the night earlier and in the morning I found her alone in the same position. By mid afternoon, a male had landed and immediately they began to mate. To my surprise, this evening I found that our female had laid eggs already! This is all very exciting for me, and I hope that you will find these photos to be exciting too.
Love your site, thanks for all things bug-related.
Signature: Julianna in PA

Promethea Moths Mating

Promethea Moths Mating

Hi Julianna,
We do find your photos of mating Promethea Moths exciting.  Like other Giant Silk Moths in the family Saturniidae, Promethea Moths do not feed as adults.  The live as adults to mate and reproduce, so they cannot waste time.  The female cannot waste her energy flying around in search of a mate, so she often waits in a good location, perhaps near a food source for the caterpillars that will hatch from the eggs she lays.  She releases pheromones and attracts any males within the vicinity.  The caterpillars will begin to search for food upon hatching, and hopefully there will be “apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush, sweetgum, tulip-tree” or even “buttonbush, magnolia, and other trees” nearby, as that is the list of food plants on BugGuide.

Promethea Moth lays eggs

Promethea Moth lays eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saved from drowning in cats’ water bowl… what is it?
Location: Orange, VA near Lake Orange
May 31, 2013 6:57 am
Found this morning lying still in pet water dish, May 31, 2013. After drying out on deck rail, it came to life, crawling on my arm. Segmented, very long antennae. Front legs look webbed or clubbed on feet. Has tiny ”hairs” enabling it to stick to anything. Kind of grasshopper like or beetle. Can you tell from my photo what it might be. Location: Orange, VA, piedmont area of central VA. Love your website!
Signature: Janine E

Sawyer

Sawyer

Hi Janine,
This is one of the Sawyers in the genus
Monochamus, and the especially long antennae is an indication this is a male.  Sawyers are Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  There is not enough detail in your photo to be certain of the species, but you can browse through BugGuide to try to determine the most likely species.

Thank you, Mr. Marlos, for identifying the bug I found. I will enjoy reading up on the Sawyer or Longhorned Borer Beetles. Could be we have them on our pine trees that were damaged by storms this and last year.
Your quick and timely response is greatly appreciated.
Janine

P.S.  We also tagged you as a Bug Humanitarian.

Thank you. Believe it or not, I am kind to spiders and stink bugs too. When I find them in my house, I catch them and put them outdoors. Insects are interesting critters. My father taught me to appreciate nature, and had a book by Jean-Henri Fabre, a French entomologist and author, that I really enjoyed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I am certain this is Satan’s pet.
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
May 30, 2013 11:30 am
My friend found this bug in her house in Puerto Rico yesterday. Right now it is in between pluvial and dry season (the only seasons we have in PR). She had her husband pick it up and throw it out the window (she lives in a 3rd floor) and this demonic-looking guy FLEW. It was quite large, about a dollar bill large (or a little bit bigger).
While she doesn’t live in a rural area, it is not uncommon to see rainforest creatures in the urban areas of Puerto Rico.
Signature: Melissa Dailey

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Melissa,
This is not Satan’s Pet.  It is a Toe-Biter or Giant Water Bug and it is reported to have quite the painful bite.  Though they are aquatic predators, Toe-Biters or Giant Water Bugs also fly quite well.  They are attracted to lights at night, earning them yet another common name:  Electric Light Bug.  Your letter will not go live to our site before early June since we are going to be away from the office, but we want activity on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination