From the monthly archives: "May 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Dallas, North Texas
May 24, 2013 4:46 pm
Hi! I live in Dallas and found this bug today. The underside of it is flesh colored with blood red spots and looks fleshy. It looks like a caterpillar of some sort. I live behind a wooded creek area and this was found near my pecan tree.
Thanks for any info!
Signature: Debra

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Hi Debra,
We believe this is an Underwing Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Catocala.  Here is a photo from our archives and one from BugGuide with the “underside of it is flesh colored with blood red spots and looks fleshy” that you described.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Minneapolis, MN
May 24, 2013 2:33 pm
I found this rather attractive black & white moth hanging out on a footpath on my way to work.
This is near the University of MN in Minneapolis. We’re having a cool/cold/late spring this year and this particular day was cold and overcast.
My limited-skill attempts to identify it have led me nowhere.
Signature: Darren Abbey

Grapevine Epimenis

Grapevine Epimenis

Hi Darren,
This is an exciting submission for us as it is an underrepresented species for our site.  We quickly identified this distinctive Owlet Moth as a Grapevine Epimenis,
Psychomorpha epimenis, thanks to BugGuide where we learned:  “The common name is unusual in that it contains the species epithet; the normal practice is to use the genus name, as in ‘Grapevine Psychomorpha.'”  There is only a hint of red showing on the underwings, but some of the photos on BugGuide show a striking large red patch that is hidden in your image.

In retrospect, there were grape vines growing adjacent to the trail where this was found.
Darren

Providing the larval food plants is one of the surest ways to attract specific butterflies and moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar Procession
Location: Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland
May 24, 2013 1:57 am
Hi,
I photographed these caterpillars in mid-April at Monte Verita, in the hills above Ascona, Switzerland. The length of the caterpillar procession was around 6 feet. They were moving pretty quickly, clearing the path in under 10 minutes. It was a warm day, between 75 and 80 degrees, and one of the first warm days of the season in the area from what I was told.
Thought you might be interested. We love your site- thank you for all you do!!
Signature: Jennifer P.

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Hi Jennifer,
Thanks so much for sending us your photos of the Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars,
Thaumetopoea pityocampa.  According to the Wildlife in France website:  “In the spring, anytime from February until May, the caterpillars leave the trees and go down to the ground, this is when we will see them forming their long nose to tail processions as they make their way to find a place in the soil to pupate, the period of pupation can last a couple of months or several years. They actually touch each other to make a long chain, hence the common name of Pine processionary moth.”  The Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars should not be handled because, according to the UK Forestry Commission website:  “caterpillars represent a public health hazard because they have thousands of hairs which contain an urticating, or irritating, protein called thaumetopoein. These hairs can be blown by the wind into contact with people and animals, resulting in painful skin irritations and rashes and, in some cases, allergic reactions in some people and animals.”

Pine Processionary Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Caterpillars

This must have been a very impressive procession to watch.

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID?
Location: San Jose CA
May 23, 2013 6:38 pm
Hi,
curious what this beetle is!
Photographed 5/23/13, they spend time between rose petals and inside rose blossom.
Thanks!
Signature: Frank

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Hi Frank,
These are excellent images of a Spotted Cucumber Beetle,
Diabrotica undecimpunctata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on roots of a wide range of plants, including many field crops” and “Considered a major pest of many field crops including cucumbers and other squashes, corn, soy. Beetles also transmit crop diseases such as bacterial wilt. Adults also reported damaging to garden plants including hibiscus, roses.”  Since you have adults in the roses, perhaps you also grow vegetables that serve as the larval food plant.

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

Spotted Cucumber Beetle


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Soldier/Futuristic Robot Bug! Crazy moulter??
Location: Evanston, IL lakefront
May 23, 2013 7:13 am
Chicago suburb: Evanston, IL
Lakefront (Lake Michigan)
Dog beach
Small, I would say an inch or less than one inch long
Crazy looking!
Camouflage warrior hard shell on the outside & metallic green robo-bug on the inside (with wings) but did NOT seem to be a bug inside a bug, but rather one single bug that was alive.
Would love to know what this thing is!!
Thanks!
Signature: Izumi

Unidentified Tiger Beetle

Common Shore Tiger Beetle

Dear Izumi,
It might take us some time to identify this Tiger Beetle  in the subfamily Cicindelinae
that is missing an elytra.

Update:  Ides of March, 2019
We just received a second comment that this is a Common Shore Tiger Beetle, Cicindela repanda.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: True Bug Colony?
Location: Coastal San Diego County
May 22, 2013 6:24 pm
Found these in my neighbors back yard…
Signature: SJD

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Dear SJD,
Though this resembles a Hemipteran aggregation, it is actually a colony of Barklice or Tree Cattle.  The look to us like
Cerastipsocus venosus which BugGuide identifies as an eastern species, though the genus is reported from Arizona.  We have not been able to substantiate any California sightings in our quick search, so they might have been accidentally introduced to your area.  Barklice are benign creatures that feed on lichens and they will not harm trees and plants.  Adults are winged and nymphs are boldly striped.

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination