From the monthly archives: "May 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What grasshopper species?
Location: Socorro County, New Mexico
May 27, 2013 1:39 pm
Hello, Can you tell what species this is? It seems unusually checkered with this bold design. And the inside of its legs are bright red orange. When resting, this color is hidden. It was in southern New Mexico at 6500 ft elevation in pinyon juniper grassland.
Signature: Mary Ray

Red Shanked Grasshopper

Red Shanked Grasshopper

Dear Mary Ray,
We matched your grasshopper to images of the Red Shanked Grasshopper,
Xanthippus corallipes, thanks to images posted to BugGuide,  where it is described as:  “A highly variable stocky and usually large species, with much regional variation in size, wing length, and in the nature of the spot pattern of the body. Almost always with at least some red coloring on inner hind femur and the hind tibiae.”

That is sooooo awesome to know! Thank you so much! And so fast on a holiday too!
Mary

 

 


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Subject: Inquiry
Location: Philippines
May 27, 2013 1:59 am
Hi Bugman. I remember sending tons of bugs for identification. I just wonder if it came through, my email’s [edited for content], from the Philippines. Thanks!
Signature: OMAN

Mystery Insect

Grasshopper:  Misythus species

Dear OMAN,
While we commend your enthusiasm to have your insects identified, we are unable to respond to the “tons of bugs for identification” we receive on a daily basis.  This particular submission contains three different photos with no attached information.  We carefully choose which letters to post based on what we believe our readership will find interesting or helpful.  Since we are a free service, we feel no obligation to answer all the mail we receive, though we make an attempt to respond to as many requests as our limited time permits. We prefer letters with helpful information and you have provided us with nothing but a request and a notice that you have submitted “tons of bugs for identification”.  Please confine your future submissions to a single species per request and please provide some information for our staff.  With that said, one of your photos has us especially intrigued.  We have no idea how to classify it and we are not even 100% certain we have correctly identified the head end.  We believe the head is on the left, as it appears there are eyes and antennae under a overhang of some sort.  There also appear to be appendages at the right end of the body.  Only four legs are visible.  We are requesting assistance from our readership on this identification.

Eric Eaton Responds:
Hi, Daniel:
I’d say this is a tetrigid:  Pygmy grasshopper, family Tetrigidae, but it might be some other family that does not occur in North America.
Eric

Karl Provides an Identification:  Misythus species
Hi Daniel and Oman:
It’s definitely an Orthopteran and it appears to be a Grouse Locust or Pygmy Grasshopper in the genus Misythus (family Tetrigidae; subfamily Cladonotinae; tribe Echinatini). I can’t categorically exclude all other genera within the Cladonotinae subfamily without doing a lot more research, but I am fairly comfortable with the genus Misythus. There are 27 recognized species, all of them equally bazaar and all endemic to the Philippines.  The Orthoptera Species File Online site has some photos and limited information for most of the species, but I couldn’t find enough information to provide a definitive identification. From what is provided, the best match appears to be M. securifer or perhaps M. banahao, but it could easily be another species as well. It’s a really cool bug; I like it! Regards. Karl

Wow, thanks so much both Karl and Eric.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much.
I saw this insect in Pangil, Laguna, Philippines on the way to the waterfalls.It was situated on a branch near our trail. A really interesting find. This was during January 2013.
I actually sent tons of inquiries before but I wasn’t answered. I am just not sure if it came through so I sent some of them again just now in a bundle. I did what you asked before by placing details on where they were seen etc. So I asked if you were able to find some of my queries …
Well if I spot new insects again that would be of interest will surely send them to you. Thanks for the help. I really though the head was on the right. Never occurred to me it was on the other end.
OMAN

Hi Again OMAN,
Thanks for the additional information on this fascinating Grasshopper.  Please feel free to resend any submissions that still have you curious.  We do tend to get very busy at times and we cannot respond to all of our mail and older submissions tend to get buried.  We will be away from the office for a spell in early June, so any mail that arrives at that time will not be read in a timely manner. 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula?
Location: Northern California
May 26, 2013 11:21 pm
Hi,
I was walking out my front door and I found this huge spider. Being fascinated with insects and arachnids, I caught him and set up a little container for him. What I noticed is that he shares many traits with tarantulas such as: hairy legs, slow movement, and a much larger head than abdomen. His body (cephalothorax + abdomen) is roughly 1 cm long, while when his legs are spread out, he is 1.5 in.
I really do hope this is a young tarantula because I would love to raise one and watch it grow.
Signature: Stanley

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Stanley,
This does appear to be a Tarantula, but we would not entirely rule out the possibility that it is a related Trapdoor Spider like members of the genus
Calisoga which are represented on BugGuide.  Most North American Tarantulas are in the genus Aphonopelma, and according to BugGuide which cites American Arachnology: “The Aphonopelma of North American are poorly known. Although many species have been described few specimens can be properly identified either by using available keys or by wading through species descriptions . Most identifiable specimens belong to species found in Mexico or Central America that are easily recognized by unique color patterns, such as that of A. seemanni . Correct identification of specimens collected within the United States is often suspect since determinations must be based on the process of elimination using collection dates and locality data in combination with coloration, coxal setation, and metatarsal scopulation .”

 

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Subject: Texas Tarantula
Location: McKinney TX
May 27, 2013 2:41 am
I volunteered at a charity event in McKinney, Texas and stumbled across the beauty. A friend of mine sat on short stone wall and was spooked by the tarantula. I quickly dumped my drink out and scooped up the spider, having never encountered one in the wild.
I was hoping you could fill me in on the exact type and sex. I believe (with really no concrete evidence) that it is a male. But again, I don’t know for sure.
I am trying to decide if I should keep him, sell him at a local exotic pet shop, or let him loose.
Thanks in advance for the information, and thank you for a great site.
Signature: Matt G

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Matt,
We believe this is a Texas Brown Tarantula,
Aphonopelma hentzi, and you can compare your individual to the photos posted on BugGuide.  We would defer sexing this individual to folks who know more about Tarantulas.  We would recommend releasing this Tarantula back where it was found.  Selling it to a pet store might be illegal if it was captured in a local, state or national park or other protected habitat.

The spider was caught on private property.  I have decided to keep him, and got care/feeding/sexing information from the aforementioned pet shop.  SHE is currently munching on a 15cent cricket.  I learned that she is around 3 years old, and can live up to 20 years.  Fascinating!

Thanks for the followup.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Andover, NJ, backyard
May 26, 2013 11:04 am
Hi BugGuy,
Hoping you can help me out with this bee. I live in northern NJ and saw this small bee today on my chive blossoms. There was also a carpenter bee on the blossoms, and this bee was roughly 1/2 the size of the carpenter, or about 1/2 inch (est). I’ve tried to find an ID for it and the closest I can come is that it may be some sort of digger bee?
Any help would be gratefully appreciated!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Dear Deborah,
In our opinion, this looks like a Bumble Bee in the genus
Bombus.  We often find identifying Bumble Bees to the species level to be a challenge, but you can try browsing the images on BugGuide for possibilities.

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug with a flower butt?
Location: Penhook,VA
May 26, 2013 4:44 am
I saw this bug last summer at Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia (near Roanoke). It is on a size 10 flip flop in the photo. And it appeared to have a flower growing out of the hind end.
Signature: Collins, VA

Mayfly

Mayfly

Hi Collins,
This insect is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  The flower is most likely just detritus that has accidentally stuck to the Mayfly, perhaps just after metamorphosis when the insect was softer and damp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination