From the monthly archives: "May 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow eyed Magicicada
Location: Manassas, Virginia
May 28, 2013 3:41 pm
Found this cutie hanging out in the garden!
Signature: Katie

Magicicada:  Brood

Magicicada: Brood II

Hi Katie,
We are very excited.  This is our first image of Brood II of the 17 Year Cicada this year.
P.S.  Nice tattoo. We color corrected your image and the color looks great.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of red and black ant-like insect
Location: Central Pennsylvania
May 27, 2013 9:11 pm
I found these insects hatching out of a grey paper-like cell type nest on our house siding here in central Pennsylvania today, May 27, 2013. I’m wondering if you can identify it.
Signature: Miriam Roush

Thanks for your consideration of my identification query. I have a bunch of friends on Facebook who are eagerly waiting for an answer, too, since I posted the photo there. Best wishes, Miriam Roush

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Dear Miriam,
This is a photo of hatchling Wheel Bugs.  Wheel Bugs are predatory Assassin Bugs and they are considered beneficial in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification needed
Location: San Diego
May 27, 2013 8:43 pm
Found these bugs on a ficus tree trunk in San Diego, CA. There was one group of the bigger bugs, and anther group with a few of the large bugs that seemed to be herding the little striped bugs. The bigger bugs were about 1/4” long, maybe less.
Can you tell me what they are, and what they are doing.
Signature: Stan

Barklice

Barklice

Hi Stan,
This is our second posting this week of an aggregation of Barklice from San Diego.  We are not certain of the species because this looks like an allegedly eastern species, Cerastipsocus venosus, that are commonly called by the Tree Cattle.  Tree Cattle are benign insects that feed on lichens and pose no threat to the tree, garden or gardener.  We don’t know if the eastern species has been accidentally introduced to the west, if this is a heretofore unknown species or if there is just little documentation on the presence of this insect in Southern California.  Time will no doubt provide some revelations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stumped on fly (?) ID
Location: Galesburg, IL. USA
May 27, 2013 11:55 pm
Haven’t seen one of these in this area, Galesburg, IL, before. Was sleeping with wings open under outdoor lights along with the usual moths, and etceteras. Shot around midnight, Memorial Day. The wing span is close to 1.25” across. Thanks for any assistance.
Signature: Susurra Fonseca

Waved Light Fly

Waved Light Fly

Hi Susurra,
It took us a bit of searching, but we eventually identified your Waved Light Fly, Pyrgota undata, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  This is a new species and we do not have a classification for it except “Flies” as a broad order category.  None the subcategories that we could possibly classify it into have common names.  According to BugGuide, it is in the family Pyrgotidae, superfamily Tephritoidea, no taxon “Acalyptratae” and then the order Diptera, the Flies.  So, though the species has a common name, no subcategories have common names.  BugGuide does state this about the life cycle:  “Life history: Female lights on a feeding May beetle, causing it to take flight. Pyrgotid then oviposits into beetle’s back while soft parts are exposed in flight. Flies usually attack female beetles only and may pursue them under lights. Larvae is about 1 cm long, takes about 14 days to kill host beetle and then consumes entire interior. Fly pupates inside host remains and pupates there, emerges following spring.”  Thank you for this interesting submission and for providing a photo of an underrepresented species for our site.  

Daniel,
Thank-you. I’ve photographed a lot of insects, especially insects that geographically
don’t belong in this area, i.e. blue cycad butterflies. Never saw that particular fly before.
The closest ID was in the bee fly family, no exact match & this had no tufts of hair on it’s body.
I’ll forward some other photos of the same fly after I ‘clean them up’ just a bit for clarity, so you
can have some other images for the site.
Susurra

We will be away for ten days, so we hope your photos don’t get lost in the backlog we expect upon our return.

Perfect time for me to procrastinate. Also, I remember the night I first saw the wave light fly,
there were a lot of ‘June’ bugs then. Maybe that’s what led it to here. Just maybe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in our garage
Location: Crossville, Tennessee
May 27, 2013 7:42 pm
We live in eastern Tennessee, this was found in our garage. Early summer evening. About 3” wingspan. Any info would be great.
Signature: Jennifer

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Hi Jennifer,
Many folks believe the Luna Moth is the lovliest North American Moth, but certainly it is the most distinctive looking North American moth as it doesn’t even remotely resemble any other species that is within our range.  Adults do not feed and only live long enough to mate and reproduce.  Your individual is a male as evidenced by his more feathery antennae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Hopkinton, Ma
May 27, 2013 7:30 pm
My son-in-law found this tonight in Hopkinton, Ma. He said it was 3-4 inches.
Signature: Suzanne

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear Suzanne,
This spectacular spider is a harmless Nursery Web Spider, Pisaurina mira.  There is a more common color variation, but this particular coloration is pictured on BugGuide.  Female Nursery
Web Spiders exhibit extreme maternal care of eggs and young spiderlings.  We will be away from the office in early June, so we are postdating your submission to go live on June 1.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination