From the monthly archives: "April 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jiminy Cricket
Location: near Medellin, Colombia
April 23, 2013 2:08 pm
Hi,
I was in Colombia, and took a picture of what I believe to be a Cricket… but what do i know? Not a lot about Crickets.
So I have a pretty good picture here. When I search for cricket images on Google, I don’t find anything like the picture i’ve taken.
Can you identify please? I’ve got the photo on Flickr.
Thanks
Signature: David Casserly

Grasshopper

Grasshopper:  Aristia mordax

Hi David,
While we are unable to provide you with an exact species name, we can tell you that this Colombian Orthopteran is a Grasshopper in the family Acrididae.

Ah ha, it’s not even a cricket! That makes sense, as I took this picture during the day.
Thanks for the info

Easy mistake as Grasshoppers and Crickets are both in the order Orthoptera.

Update:  October 27, 2013
We received a comment today from caranpaima who identified this as a male
Aristia mordax, and we verified that with this photo on FlickR and this black and white image of a mounted specimen on Orthoptera Species File online. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 10 appendages
Location: south Texas, Laredo
April 23, 2013 6:40 pm
This is an odd looking spider ? Comes out at night, fast ground runner and aggressive when cornered. About a inch and a half long.
Signature: C. Ritchie

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear C. Ritchie,
Though these creatures are sometimes called Wind Scorpions or Sun Spiders, they are in their own Arachnid order Solifugae, so Solifugid is a more correct common name.  In some parts of their range, they are called Sand Puppies.  Though they are related to both spiders and scorpions, Solifugids do not have venom, so they are harmless, though the bite of a large Solifugid might draw blood.  In the Middle East where they are known as Camel Spiders, they grow much larger than they do in North America, and despite the numerous myths associated with they, they are nonetheless not dangerous creatures.  As your email indicates, they are nocturnal and they are hunters that will quickly dispatch much larger prey.  We receive many photos of dead Solifugids because they appear so frightening.  See BugGuide for additonal information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Nicaragua
April 23, 2013 4:50 pm
Hello there,
I’m very curious what kind of beetle this is!
I can’t find it anywhere and looked everywhere!
Hope you guys can help me.
Greetings,
Signature: Chantal Bosma

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Chantal,
This is a Cicada, not a beetle, and it is gorgeous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: USA, Central CA, 4,000’ elev.
April 22, 2013 7:37 pm
This flying Bottlebrush is fast and acrobatic. Keeps tripping my night security camera. I wanted to see if the lynx was coming around, but this critter keeps turning the ’record’ on the camera all night. It doesn’t seem to have any head, just a thin rod-like ’body’ with many circular rows of bristle-like ’wings’. I turned the red LED’s off on the camera to see if that will stop him. I do have recorded video of him zipping around, if that would help. I’ve never seen or heard about anything like this in this area; however, the insects at this elevation are quite unique to me. The photos are with infrared illumination.
Signature: Tom

Bug in Flight

Bug in Flight

Dear Tom,
We believe this is a moth or some other nocturnal insect.  We also believe the slow shutter speed has captured its movement rather than accurately recording its shape.  What you are viewing is several flaps of the wings as the insect moves forward.  We would suggest a net if you want a more accurate identity.

Flying Insect

Nocturnal Flying Insect

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bristle fly
Location: Mokotua, near Invercargill, NZ
April 23, 2013 1:35 am
Hi there. This photo was taken in the autumn here, late in the day. The fly is on a Juncus rush, near a wetland area, with lots of native vegetation dominated by manuka. Hope the photo is clear enough.
Signature: Gay

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Possibly Tachinid Fly

Dear Gay,
We believe this is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae.  See BugGuide for additional information.  The larvae of Tachinid Flies are internal parasites that kill their insect and arachnid hosts.  Generally each species of Tachinid Fly is very host specific, so they are important biological control agents.

Hi Danial.
Thanks very much for that information. Confirms what our local bugman suggested, but interesting to hear that these flies are host specific and potentially a part of controlling pest species. Your time on this one is much appreciated. That’s an excellent website and resource you have there.
Cheers, Gay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jumping Spider? from North Cyprus
Location: North Cyprus
April 22, 2013 12:03 am
This fellow was seen outside Kantara Castle on 21st April 2013, near 2pm local time. This is at about 630m ASL. A friend says try jumping spiders, but I can’t find it.
Thanks very much.
Signature: muymalestado

Jumping spider

Jumping spider

Dear muymalestado,
Your friend is correct.  This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and it is most likely in the genus
Phidippus.  We could not determine any species identification.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination