From the monthly archives: "April 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in Tega Cay, SC
Location: Upstate South Carolina
April 26, 2013 3:48 pm
We have a large abundance of these small ladybug sized bugs in our yard. They came out about 10 days ago and there are 100’s in our yard. Areas appear black or dotted there are so many of them. One photo is a close-up of the bug, the other is how they are scattered on the house. Can you help identify and provide some information?
Signature: Tega Cay, SC

Lablab Bug lays eggs

Kudzu Bug lays eggs

This is a Bean Plataspid or Globular Stink Bug, Megacopta cribraria, which is also called a Lablab Bug.  We don’t know the origin of the name Lablab Bug, but we are amused by it and that is our common name of choice for this Invasive Exotic Species.  We first received a report from Georgia in 2011 of this species and learned that it was first discovered in North America in 2009.  Since that time it has spread through the south.  It feeds on another invasive species, the Kudzu, and according to BugGuide, which is now using Kudzu Bug as the common name of choice, it is:  “the only member of its family reported from the Western Hemisphere.”  BugGuide also notes:  “may invade homes in large numbers and become a household pest; highly invasive species of mixed impact: it seems to prefer kudzu (a highly invasive and damaging plant), but can also become a serious pest of leguminous crops.”  We have received numerous reports of Home Invasions.

Kudzu Bugs

Kudzu Bugs

Comment from Ted
Subject: LabLab Bug
April 27, 2013 4:18 pm
You stated you were amused by the name LabLab. I occasionally grow a beautiful asian bean that goes by the name of hyacinth bean or LabLab. I  would strongly suspect this is the origin of the nickname. By the way- LabLab is particularly striking when grown together with blue Morning Glories here in Chicago.  Love your site and always will even if my contributions never find their way to the web page! Your Always Faithful Reader, Ted
Signature: Ted

Thanks for the informative comment.  We are troubled to learn that you have submitted identification requests or other potential website content and we haven’t ever posted anything.  Much of the selection process is luck, but a catchy subject line generally gets our attention as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth or butterfly?
Location: Rhome, Texas
April 26, 2013 2:10 pm
We found this little thing in the garage resting this morning and just curious what it is because we haven’t ever seen these out here… Thanks
Signature: C. Draper

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear C. Draper,
It is unlikely that any other North American insect will be confused with a Luna Moth.  This is a lovely male Luna Moth, distinguished from the female by his more feathery antennae.  Luna Moths do not feed as adults, living only long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Luna Moths are found in the eastern portion of North America and you are probably near the western most extent of the range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Worm?
Location: South Africa
April 26, 2013 3:44 am
I found this worm crawling into the house. It’s the second one we have found trying to make it’s way indoors. The first on was yellow and green if I remember correctly.
What is it?
Signature: Don’t understand the question

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hawkmoth Caterpillar:  Coelonia fulvinotata

This is a Hornworm, a caterpillar in the Hawkmoth family Sphingidae.  We believe it is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, though this is not the typical color we see for the species.  Typically, the caterpillarof the Death’s Head Hawkmoth are a bright green and yellow color like your email indicates.  According to the Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic:  “Prior to pupation, the fully-grown larva darkens over a period of several hours, during which stage it anoints its whole body with ‘saliva’; this appears to hasten the darkening process. This completed, a suitable location for pupation is sought.”  We are not certain why they are trying to get indoors, but they might be seeking a suitable location to pupate.

Update:  May 5, 2013
We just received a wonderful correction and explanation of why this is actually Coelonia fulvinotata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a moth, found your site, now to find out what it is!
Location: Richmond, VA, USA
April 25, 2013 2:01 pm
Hi there!
I found this fella today in the 5th floor stairwell of a parking deck in downtown Richmond, VA. I thought he was fairly big (until seeing some of the very large bugs on this site!); maybe about 3” wide, average-sized lady-hand included for scale. He seemed like he might have had an injured leg, and a little difficulty crawling. I figured he probably would rather be outside than in an under-construction parking deck, so relocated him to a tree (hopefully he hasn’t gotten eaten by a bird.. but he seemed to have pretty decent camouflage.)
Any idea what sort of moth this is? Thanks!
Signature: kira

Elm Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Dear Kira,
This is one of the Sphinx Moths or Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is an Elm Sphinx or Four Horned Sphinx,
Agrius amyntor, based on photos posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Elm Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Update:  January 27, 2018
We just received a comment from Stephen Kloiber that this is a Waved Sphinx, not an Elm Sphinx.  The Waved Sphinx is profiled on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crawfish-like beetle?
Location: Central Florida
April 24, 2013 1:01 pm
Hello! I stumbled across your website when searching for an identity to a bug I found in my home. It’s springtime (April) in Florida, but I’ve found evidence of the same bug’s molt a few months ago (around the time a termite swarm entered my home). From tail to antennae, it’s about 1.25”-1.5” long. I’m truly at a loss as to what kind of bug this could be…thank you kindly for your expert eyes!
Signature: A. Robinson

Silverfish

Silverfish

Dear A. Robinson,
We thought this looked like a Silverfish, but perhaps it is the angle of the photo, but we were not certain, so we checked with Eric Eaton first.  Here is his reply:  “Nope, still a silverfish, or firebrat.  The scales are rubbed off, which makes ID more difficult.  Eric.”  Silverfish are common household pests that will eat a wide variety of organic substances in the home, including the glue used in wallpaper and book bindings.

Mr. Marlos,
Thank you for your response!  Now that I know it’s most likely a silverfish, I feel a little silly asking for ID.  I’ve only ever identified silverfish when they were alive, so perhaps that’s where my confusion originated.  I suppose it’s a good sign that I’ve only found dead ones in my current home.
Thanks, again.
Amber

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Palmetto beetle
Location: Central Canada
April 26, 2013 5:02 am
Please help me identify the creature found in springtime in Quebec, Canada (not a hot climate)…it’s about 2” in length…
Signature: Marie

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Marie,
A Palmetto Bug is a common name for the large American Cockroaches found in the south.  This is a Giant Water Bug, a common name for a predatory aquatic True Bug.  Giant Water Bugs are sometimes called Toe-Biters because of the painful bite they can inflict on unwary swimmers and waders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination