From the monthly archives: "April 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Just Saying Thank You!
Website: lhexperience.blogspot.com
April 29, 2013 12:02 pm
Dear WTB,
I found your website back in 2008/2009 and have been revisiting it pretty often ever since. I have never had anything that I wanted identified, a few times I did have a question but I was able to find it myself by looking through the archives first. I really enjoy reading it just for fun. I am not all that very interested in bugs really but I just really like this site here. Thank you for making it such fun to browse through! I always come here first whenever I want to know something about bugs. Today I discovered centipedes in my garden and I was worried they were bad. I looked around and discovered that there are quite a few different kinds of centipedes!
Thanks again!
Signature: Elise

House Centipede Eats Cricket

House Centipede Eats Cricket

Dear Elise,
Thank you for the sweet message.  We love getting fanmail.  It really made our day.  We try to make the site entertaining and fun.  Though we strive for accuracy with identifications, we are more generalists that are attempting to promote an appreciation of the lower beasts in an effort to help folks understand the interconnectivity of all life forms on this fragile planet.  We are illustrating this posting with a photo from our archives of the much maligned and misunderstood House Centipede, a beneficial predator that will keep the house rid of other unwanted creatures like cockroaches.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of Mayfly is this?
Location: Columbia, MO
April 29, 2013 5:17 pm
A fly fishing buddy and I are trying to identify the name of this mayfly. Any help would be appreciated. I took this picture on my back porch in Columbia, MO on 4/29/13 at 7pm.
Signature: DocChad

Mayfly

Possibly Flatheaded Mayfly

Hi DocChad,
We tend to be amateur generalists here at What’s That Bug? and we are not very good at keying out difficult species.  With that said, this Mayfly appears to be very similar to this image posted to BugGuide that is identified as being in the family Heptageniidae, the Flatheaded Mayflies.

Flatheaded Mayfly, we believe.

Flatheaded Mayfly, we believe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Witch Moths from Ecuador
Location: Loja, Ecuador
April 29, 2013 5:38 pm
One day I visited the local Soccer stadium of Loja, Ecuador, and had the luck of finding these beautiful Moths lining the walls. I’m assuming that they were attracted to the stadium’s lights during the match the night before.
If my identification is correct, these are White Witch moths, Thysania agrippina. Thought I didn’t know this at the time, this species is known for having the largest wingspan of any moth or butterfly in the world. Hope you like the pictures!
Signature: Eric

Owl Moth

Owl Moth

Hi Eric,
Your guess on the species is close, but not exact.  The lighter moth is an Owl Moth,
Thysania zenobia.  It is in the same genus as the White Witch, but it is a considerably smaller moth.  You may read more about the Owl Moth on the Texas Entomology website or on BugGuide.  The photo with numerous darker moths illustrates Black Witches, Ascalapha odorata.  There is much lore associated with Black WitchesYou can read more on BugGuide.

Black Witches

Black Witches

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue/Beige Butterfly, Perhaps a Reakirt’s Blue?
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
April 28, 2013 8:58 pm
Bright sun and a fast butterfly make this one difficult for me to identify. Its overall look in person was small and beige. The blue showed when it flew. Is it possibly a Reakirt’s Blue butterfly, an Echinargus isola? Thank you! Mostly sunny, warm day today, and this is in a field of native grasses, saplings and wildflowers. Here’s the reference from Bug Guide: http://bugguide.net/index.php?q=search&keys=reakirt%27s+blue&search=Search
Signature: Ellen

Which Blue is it???

Which Blue is it???

Hi Ellen,
While we agree that this is one of the Blues in the subfamily Polyommatinae, we cannot say for certain that it is Reakirt’s Blue.  This is a very difficult group for us to identify to the species level.

Blue, but which one???

Blue, but which one???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red/black flying and it bites or stings
Location: Princeton TX a lot of trees around our house
April 28, 2013 9:37 pm
I got bit or stung by this lil guy on my back…very painful very swollen… red body black head wings and legs there are a lot of them in the house we just found please help identify this guy so I know how to get rid of them. Thanks Nicole
Signature: Nicole Russell

Black Corsair

Black Corsair

Hi Nicole,
Your photos are quite blurry, but we can tell by the shape, coloration and your description that this is a Black Corsair,
Melanolestes picipes, a species of Assassin Bug.  The bite is reported to be quite painful, but not dangerous.  You can get more information on the Black Corsair on BugGuide.

Black Corsair

Black Corsair

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dear Bugman
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
April 29, 2013 4:38 am
I found this beetle (I think it’s a beetle) in an sweet berry tree. It was close to a centimeter and a half in length, mostly bluish-green but pinkish-purple towards the underside of its abdomen. I know its not a June beetle because I have photographed those before. Could you identify this one for me?
Meg

Lychee Shield Bug

Lychee Shield Bug

Dear Meg,
This is a Lychee Shield Bug or Jewel Bug,
 Chrysocoris stolli.  There are matching photos on TrekNature and Project Noah.  These are True Bugs, not Beetles.  Are Sweet Berries the same as Lychees?

Lychee Shield Bug

Lychee Shield Bug

Hey there Daniel,
Thank you so much for the ID. I hadn’t known the name of the sweet berries earlier but now I do. They’re called Jamaican cherries. Lychees are different, they have a spikey red brown shell, and white semi-transparent flesh within. Quite delicious!
Cheers,
Meg.


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination