From the monthly archives: "March 2013"

Subject: aquatic bug
Location: Central Kentucky
March 22, 2013 2:53 pm
I found this bug in a small woodland stream today. I am located in Central Kentucky. The bug is alive and moving around and the current temp is 40 degrees. It has been below freezing at night for the past week.
Signature: A.Selter

Freshwater Isopod

Freshwater Isopod

Hi Guys,
I think I may have identified the bug via an old book I have, “Pond Life”, and BugGuide.net. I’ll call it an Aquatic Isopod Asellus. I didn’t locate a photo of this particular bug on your website so you can use mine if you like.
Thanks, Angela~

Hi Angela,
We didn’t realize you already found the identification.  Here is our response:
Dear A. Selter,
This is a Freshwater Isopod, a type of Crustacean that is distantly related to marine lobsters and crabs as well as terrestrial Pill Bugs or Rollie Pollies.  It seems to resemble the genus
Asellus which is represented on BugGuide.

Subject: Yellow Salticidae
Location: Manglayang Mountain, West Java, Indonesia
March 22, 2013 9:30 pm
Hello again Daniel,
I wanted to ask what kind of fat salticidae this is.
This funny fellow eat a grasshopper on a banana leaf, after that she move to a higher ground making out a bed out of her web then she fell a sleep.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Jumping Spider eats Grasshopper

Jumping Spider eats Grasshopper

Hi Mohamad,
We are not certain if we will be able to identify this lovely Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae to the species level, but we think your photographs are amazing.  We are posting them and perhaps we will have some time in the future to research additional information.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Thanks Daniel,
I’m also still trying to browse for more info of this salticidae, but still couldn’t find any suitable lead.

Update:  May 10, 2013
Thanks to a comment that this is Hyllus giganteus, we are able to link to matching photos at Reptile Forums and this video on UIOVN.

 

Subject: Caterpillar that ate my Satsuma
Location: Livingston, Louisiana
March 23, 2013 7:34 am
It has been a while since I took this picture (it took me a while to find the picture). Around this time last year, can’t remember the specific day, I found this caterpillar on my small Satsuma. I have never seen a caterpillar like this one in my life. So I took a picture of them so I could see what they were. I found them on your web site, the Giant Swallowtail, but what I am wanting to know is – Do they hang around this area much? I live in Livingston Louisiana. I have lived at this residence for 15 years and this was the first time I had seen them. The small Satsuma they ate was mostly thorns. The Satsuma had been in the back yard for two years before I saw the caterpillars. Are they in this area much? If so I will leave the tree for them to snack on. I did not get to see the Butterflies and the caterpillars were gone the next day. I would love to see them in my yard more often. How can I do to get them to come back? What really peaked my curiosi ty was when my son touched one of them it put out a nasty odor and these bright red feelers or antenna. What do I need to do to bring one indoors to watch it emerge from a cocoon?
Signature: Rebecca Lambert

Orange Dogs

Orange Dogs

Hi Rebecca,
This might be our favorite photo ever of Orange Dogs, the caterpillars of the Giant Swallowtail,
Papilio cresphontes.  We generally tell home gardeners that despite the caterpillars feeding on the leaves, the trees will survive and butterflies will follow, but we never get reports of so many Orange Dogs on a single tree.  Perhaps there was no other nearby food source, and that is why so many eggs were laid in one place.  Swallowtails deposit eggs singly, not in a cluster like some other insects.  We also love that your photo shows so many individuals with the osmeterium exposed.  The red horns, as you indicate, are a defense mechanism that acts as a visual deterrent as well as an olfactory one.  You are within the natural range of the Giant Swallowtail, a native species that fed on common pricklyash and other native plants prior to the introduction of citrus.  Cultivation of citrus has allowed a range expansion to occur and now Giant Swallowtails are common in southern California, a portion of the country that they are not native to.  The coloration of the Orange Dog is thought to resemble droppings from a bird, which acts as an additional camouflage protection.  You should be able to raise a caterpillar in an old aquarium with a screen top if you want to observe the eclosion.  We would also suggest planting nectar plants including lantana and composites like echinacea if you want to attract additional adult Giant Swallowtail butterflies to your garden.  Your letter indicates you took the photo last year, so we are guessing the 2007 date stamp is incorrect.

Orange Dog

Orange Dog

Subject: Wild beauty !
Location: Koh Yao Noi
March 23, 2013 3:06 am
Hi there !
Pictured this beautiful spider this week, and her amazing dome-like web, can you help me identify the species ? We are on Koh Yao Noi, small island near Phuket, Southern Thailand.
Let me know if quality is insufficient.
Thanks a lot in advance
Signature: Olivier

Orbweaver and Prey

Orbweaver and Prey

Hi Olivier,
This is some species of Orbweaver.  We will attempt to do additional research to see if we can provide a species identification for you.  The web is rather distinctive.

Orbweaver Web

Orbweaver Web

Subject: winged-caterpillar-spider bug
Location: Alpine, CA
March 21, 2013 1:11 pm
I saw this bug on the ground outside my office on 3/20/13 in Alpine, CA. I have never seen anything like it. It looks like a combination of a spider, butterfly, and caterpillar. It seemed to be trying to walk and/or fly and seemed to be having trouble doing either. Is no longer there, so unsure what happened to it. Was quite large-body was about 1 inch, wings were maybe 2 inches.
Signature: Jennifer

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Hi Jennifer,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, Hyalophora euryalus, and this is not the first time that we have received a letter requesting the identification of a large moth that was compared in appearance to a caterpillar.  You can find more information on the Ceanothus Silkmoth on BugGuide

Subject: ID please.
Location: Sivssagar, Assam, India
March 20, 2013 12:00 pm
Sir,
I found this insect in Sivsagar, Assam, India but don’t know the name.
So would like to know this name.
Regards,
Jeet Saikia,
Bangalore. India.

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Jeet Saikia,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  We are unable to provide a species identification at this time.