From the monthly archives: "March 2013"

Subject: netcasting spider
Location: costa rica Tortuguero
March 27, 2013 12:33 am
do you have the exact name for this species?
thank you
Signature: fred from belgium

Netcasting Spider

Netcasting Spider

Hi Fred,
We are unable to do any research on this Netcasting Spider at this time, but it is really a lovely photo.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.  We would urge you to provide a comment on each of your unidentified species on our site and then you will be notified in the future if any experts provide information.

Subject: It’s not all in my head!
Location: Scalp
March 27, 2013 6:05 am
These insects came from my scalp. Two years ago I started with a small area on my scalp that felt like a bite. The area is now the crown of my head, made worse by using a duo derm patch, not knowing I had a sensitivity to adhesive. My hair grew under the scalp, and that is where these bugs came from.
Signature: Elaine

Possible Louse

Thrips perhaps

Dear Elaine,
We sympathize with your situation.  We hope you sought professional medical assistance and we would urge you to seek out a definitive identification from your local entomology department.  While this creature looks vaguely louselike, it doesn’t seem to match images of Parasitic Lice on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide something more conclusive.

Update:  March 27, 2013
Tenodera, one of our readers, submitted a comment indicating this resembles a Thrips, and we agree.  See BugGuide for a description of Thrips.  The mystery is why are Thrips livng on Elaine’s scalp.

Subject: spider
Location: Gunung Manglayang Cilengkrang 40615, Indonesia
March 26, 2013 12:34 am
Hello Daniel,
3.24.2013. I met this guy hiding under a leaf at night hunting photo at Manglayang Mountain, West Java, Indonesia, first time seeing this one. The size is not more than 2 cm from toe to toe and this guy had a lovely abdomen color and pattern.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Spider

Spider

Hi again Mohamad,
Thanks to the nice facial view, someone with more experience at spider eye arrangements might be able to provide you with a family on this Spider.  See BugGuide for Spider Eye Arrangements.

Subject: Identify the bug
Location: Hyderabad (A.P) INDIA
March 26, 2013 2:51 am
Hello Sir, Pls identify the bug… And give me the classification also.
Thank u sir.
Signature: 919949863709

Red Bugs

Red Bugs

Dear 919949863709,
How sad that in India you have been dehumanized into a 12 digit number for identification purposes.  Our own American nine digit identification numbers are also used for identity purposes, but to avoid identity thieves, we do not freely publish that information.  These are Red Bugs in the family
Pyrrhocoridae.  We found a link on India Nature Watch that identifies it as a Stainer Bug, but no species name.

 

 

Subject: Oxyopidae?
Location: Tambopata, Peru
March 26, 2013 3:52 am
Found on a broad leef during the night in Tambopata Nature Reserve in Peru.
Signature: salparadis

Spider eats Termite

Spider eats Termite

Dear salparadis,
We cannot say for certain that this is a Lynx Spider in the family Oxyopidae.  Our first inclination would be to say an Ant Mimic Spider, but again, we cannot be certain.  See some photos of North American Ant Mimic Spiders on BugGuide for comparison.  Tropical species can be very difficult to identify.  The prey appears to be a Termite alate.  Despite our not being able to provide you with an identification, we are posting your lovely Food Chain image.

Subject: Fly ID
Location: Starr County, Texas
March 25, 2013 5:05 pm
We found this fella feeding on suflowers in South Texas. Long longs, long proboscis – definitely designed for feeding on these flowers. Can you identify?
Signature: Tim

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Tim,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae.  We would prefer to leave a species identification to a Dipterist or someone else who specializes in the family or order.  Bee Flies are pollinating insects and you can read more about them on BugGuide.  It appears this might be a member of the genus
Bombylius, but often superficial visual similarities exist across genera.  You may also read about Bombylius on BugGuide.