From the monthly archives: "February 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identity, please?
Location: Kalbarri National Park, Western Australia
February 23, 2013 1:27 pm
The attached bug was about 10mm long, and on a handrail of an overlook. I have failed to identify it with Google images. It may be a nymph, I suppose. Any ideas will be really appreciated. Many thanks in advance.
Signature: Colin

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Hi Colin,
We quickly identified this as a Large Milkweed Bug,
Spilostethus hospes , on the Brisbane Insect website where it is classified as a Seed Bug in the family Lygaeidae.  The webmaster gives it the creative Star Wars reference name of Darth Maul Bug.  Save Our Waterways Now is in agreement with that identification, but does not refer to the name Darth Maul Bug.  Bold Systems Taxonomy Browser is also in agreement as is Australian Nature PHotographyEncyclopedia of Life pictures other members in the genus.  The Entomology at Department of Agriculture Western Australia provides a better match with Spilostethus pacificus, though there is also a photo of a specimen of Spilostethus hospes that appears to be a narrower insect.   We then encountered a discrepancy on the Light Creations site where it is called a Hong Kong Stink Bug in the family Coreidae.

Hi,
Thank you so much for such a quick identification, and I’m sorry I’ve not had a chance before now to write back to you.
If you would like more details of the photograph of the Large Milkweed Bug (Spilostethus hospes), it was taken at 10.13am on the 3rd February 2013 at the coastal area of Kalbarri National Park, Western Australia.  The exact position was on the northern safety handrail of the Grandstand Lookout.
Regards,
Colin Butterworth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egyptian beetle
Location: Egypt, Wadi Degla
February 23, 2013 10:12 am
Hi Bug guy,
I live in Cairo, Egypt. When I walk in the desert there is one diurnal beetle I see a lot. Yesterday I saw 20 of them, three together at one place. They are noticeably long-legged, with grooved elytra. Can you tell me what family or genus this beetle is in? Thanks, Greg
Signature: Greg

Darkling Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Hi Greg,
This is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae.  It reminds us of the Desert Stink Beetles or Acrobat Beetles in the genus
Eleodes that are found in North America, and though we do not believe your beetle is in the same genus, you can see the more specific taxonomy provided on BugGuide.  Your beetle looks similar to this Egyptian Darkling pictured on Getty Images and this Israeli Darkling on Media Focus.

Darkling Beetle

Darkling Beetle

Thanks!  I had figured it was a teneb.  If you find out anything else about it I’m interested.  Thanks again, Greg

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this strange insect?
Location: Chennai,India
February 21, 2013 12:28 pm
Hello Bugman,
Attaching image of insect that I photographed in my garden in the month of September. Can you help identify this insect?
Signature: Seema Swami

Hopper Nymph

Hopper Nymph

Hi Seema,
This is some type of Hopper nymph and it might be very difficult to identify to the species level.  It does resemble some of the members of the family pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: little sesame seed like things in my bed
Location: NYC
February 21, 2013 7:01 pm
Every morning I wake up and there are about 30-50 of these little sesame seed like objects in my bed. I have read about pets leaving things like that from tapeworms but i do not have pets. I feel fine, no stomach issues and am not getting bitten overnight. I have no idea where these things are coming from.
Signature: BK

Termite Pellets, probably

Termite Pellets, probably

Dear BK,
Though we have identified Sesame Seeds as suspected insects in the past, and despite the lack of clarity in your photograph, we are going to eliminate sesame seeds as suspects in your situation.  We believe you have Termite Pellets, fecal matter containing digested wood.  Depending upon where they are appearing, you may
have a Termite infestation in your walls, beams or possibly even the bed itself.  There may be some helpful information on the Termite Information website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Super large bee
Location: Tampa Florida
February 21, 2013 6:47 pm
We found this bee in our yard in Tampa on Feb 21, 2013. It measures 2 inches long.
Signature: Lsolie

Male Carpenter Bee

Male Carpenter Bee

Dear Lsolie,
This is a male Carpenter Bee, and we don’t believe it is a species native to Florida.  Members of the subgenus
Neoxylocopa which includes the Valley Carpenter Bee, exhibit sexual dimorphism and the males are golden while the females are black.  BugGuide lists the range as:  “essentially a neotropical group, with a couple of spp. restricted to Pacific islands; in our area, one sp. widely western (to sw. BC), another only along the Mexican border (TX-AZ).”  To the best of our knowledge, no Carpenter Bees from eastern North America have golden males, though there are native Carpenter Bees. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Trinidad
February 22, 2013 3:34 pm
This is a bug my brother saw in Trinidad. I think it’s like a Harlequin….
Signature: Jeff

Harlequin Beetle

Harlequin Beetle

Hi Jeff,
You are correct.  This is a Harlequin Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination