From the monthly archives: "February 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug!
Location: Mansfield, Ohio
February 23, 2013 8:24 pm
Hi guys!
I apologize for sending my bug identification query with the wrong section of your site.
This is the insect; He has a one and a half inch or so thorax that is arrow shaped. His thorax is about a three quarters of an inch wide. His head is small and directly attached to his thorax. He has six legs. He has wings but doesn’t appear to be capable of sustained flight. They appear in all parts of the house but mainly around windows. His back area is brown but speckled with gray.
We live in central Ohio and have had these little visitors since mid fall until now (late winter.)
Thanks bug guys!
Aaron

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Hi Aaron,
This is a very artful photograph of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  If we ever do a calendar again, this would be a wonderful image of an invasive species that invades homes.  Ground Zero for this Asian species is suspected to be Maryland.  It was a Bug of the Month several years ago and we have numerous other postings on our site.  Just use our search engine to find all the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug postings.  BugGuide has wonderful information on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug or Interstate Bug or Asian Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hibernating Moths
Location: Seattle WA
February 21, 2013 10:33 pm
I was cleaning the Garage, and when I opened the barbecue grill (to fix the handle) I found that it had become a ”den of choice” for hibernation. I think these are Ectropis crepuscularia – Small Engrailed. There are a lot of them, dozens, all through the garage, and they move only very slowly, but I thought this grouping amusing.
Signature: George

Winter Geometrid Moths

Hibernating Winter Geometrid Moths

Dear George from Washington,
These are Geometrid Moths in the family Geometridae.  They are also commonly called Measuring Worm Moths or Inchworm Moths.  We located on JSTOR an online article called Bat predation and flight timing of winter moths,
Epirrita and Operophtera species (Lepidoptera, Geometridae) by Mats G. E Svensson, Jens Rydell and Richard Brown,  when we searched for “hibernating Geometrids.”  We then searched those names and found additional information, but the photos are all of rather drab and unremarkable looking moths shaped similarly to your beauties, but without the intricate markings on your moths.  These must be hibernating male Winter Geometrid Moths, and we don’t really know how to tell them apart for certain based on the markings found in photos of individuals online.  BugGuide has some pictures of several species from the genus Operophtera found in North America and all three species are found along the West Coast.  The markings on the Espirrita species pictured on BugGuide are more defined, but different from the markings on your moths.   We love your photo.  We rotated it and cropped it to a square prior to sizing for the internet.  Moth PHotographers Group has nice photos of the Autumnal Moth, but they do not look like your moths.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider from Southern Thailand
Location: Southern Thailand, Khao lak
February 21, 2013 10:35 am
We came across this fine looking spider. We then tried to find it online, but without any luck. Can you help us identify this bug? Thx
Signature: Tina & Chris

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Hi Tina & Chris,
This spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, but we cannot tell the species at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Swaziland
February 23, 2013 4:00 am
I saw this beetle at the entrance to an old mine shaft in the hills of Piggs Peak, Swaziland and would like to know what it is.
Signature: Jacs

Tree Cockroach

Tree Cockroach

Hi Jacs,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Cockroach.  We thought it might be difficult to identify as some African Insects are not well represented on the internet.  We quickly found it identified as a Tree Cockroach,
Gyna caffrorum, on the Ndumo Game Reserve website.  The Allpet Roaches Forum indicates it was recently introduced to Cockroach fanciers in Europe.  The Virginia Cheeseman website of entomology supplies provides the common name Ghost Porcelain Cockroach, though we suspect that is a marketing ploy to get folks to purchase them as pets.

Thank you very much for the info. It’s great to identify insects, birds etc.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it a bee?

Location: Bujumbura, Burundi, East Africa
February 23, 2013 3:16 pm
Hello,
I wonder if you could help me in identifying the following bug – it was really big – perhaps two centimetres long, and when I first saw it it was flying, and out of the corner of my eye, I thought it was a beetle… at closer inspection, though it clearly wasn’t. It has dark wings, and it’s very sturdy indeed. Anyway, I managed to get this picture of it once it landed.
It was in Burundi, on the north coast of lake tanganyika, just over the border from tanzania.
I saw it about midday, and I could see its head swivelling from side to side as it looked around.
Would be fascinated to know what it is. Couldn’t believe how big it was!
Thanks
Signature: Rob

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Hi Rob,
This is one impressive Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We quickly found a matching photo on The Featured Creature where it is identified as being in the genus
Hyperechia.  We found other photos on GorillaCD, the official site of the Virunga National Park and a followup provided this information:  “I wrote to two guys at the Zoology Dept of University of Cape Town. One of them, Mike Picker, wrote a book on insects. Here’s what he said: ‘It’s a robberfly, probably genus Hyperechia. The diff. species of Hyperechia each mimic a different species of carpenter bee. The adult flies feed on carpenter bees and wasps, and the larvae also live in holes in wood with the carpenter bee larvae, on which they feed. There are other very large robberflies that mimic spider wasps.'”  A similar looking individual posted to FlickR is identified as Hyperechia nigrita.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Fort Worth, TX
February 23, 2013 11:51 am
I found this bug in the laundry room of my house. Can you please help me figure out what kind of spider it is and if I should be worried?
Thank you!
Signature: Jayme

Fake Spider

Fake Spider

Hi Jayme,
You should be very, very worried.  This Spider might kill you if you accidentally swallow it and its rubber legs lodge in your throat.  This is not the first time we have been asked to identify Fake Spiders.  At least Jody acknowledged that her spiders were fake.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination