From the monthly archives: "February 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large moth
Location: Southern California-San Diego-Camp Pendleton
February 1, 2013 8:27 pm
i saw this today at work just wanted to know what it was.
thank you
Signature: adam

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Adam,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth and you can tell by his especially plumose antennae that he is a male.  Ceanothus Silkmoths don’t feed as adults.  They live long enough to mate and procreate.  Since a male and female may eclose or emerge from their cocoons many miles apart, the female releases pheromones and the male senses her with his antennae.  Once they mate, she lays eggs on California Lilac or Ceanothus and the caterpillars feed on the leaves.
Are you a Marine?  Will you be going oversees?  Are you taking a camera and internet connectivity?  Please take photos of exotic bugs and email them to our site.  Good luck.

Ceanothus Silkmoth

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Check out Cesar Crash’s Insetologia Blog of Brazilian Bugs!!!

Subject: Elongated headed Katydid
Location: Brasilia, Brazil
February 1, 2013 8:45 am
Hi, BugGuys!
I received these images of an unusual looking Katydid. It has a conical shaped head, but I don’t think it’s a conehead, it has the antenas close to the tip of the head and other distinctive particularities I don’t find in any ither Katydids.
The pictures was taken by Barbara, she lives in South Africa, but the pictures was taken here in Brazil.
Signature: Cesar Crash

Atypical Lubber Grasshopper

Hi Cesar,
Thanks so much for forwarding Barbara’s wonderful photos.  This is definitely an Orthopteran, but we disagree that it is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera that includes the Katydids.  The antennae and overall morphology look more like that of a Grasshopper in the suborder Caelifera.  We will contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he recongnizes this large orthopteran.  Meanwhile, we will continue to research its identity on our own.
P.S.  Your Insetologia Blog is looking great.  We tried to post a comment to your
Callicore posting but we are not sure if we followed the directions correctly.

Atypical Lubber Grasshopper

LOL. I have to say that the antenas was among the “other distinctive particularities” (but also the spines, the back, the underside, the bottom…)
Daniel, I didn’t understand the translation thing. Clicking on the translation, it opened this post? That’s strange, it is taking me to this: http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Finsetologia.blogspot.com.br%2F&langpair=auto%7Cen&hl=en
I also did not recieve any comment. So bad.
I forgot to say, I will do another research tonight, based on Caelifera. Thank you very much.

Atypical Lubber Grasshopper

Hi again Cesar,
The translation feature on my end for your website works great.  Since I don’t understand Portuguese, I clicked on the British flag and could read a (failed) translation in English.  Remember, idioms never translate correctly.  Mapwing comes out Wings-of-Map.  When I tried to post a comment, there was no English translation, and there are two things to translate, a group of letters and a photo of a number.  I believe I need to duplicate both, but I am not sure if I need to put a space between the two.  Perhaps I am only supposed to choose one of the images.  I will try again if you can provide some instruction.  At any rate, I am most definitely linking to your blog for future South American entries on WTB?  Your next step is to have google search engines find you.  Congratulations again on a wonderful site.

Hehe, “that translator” used to translate bug in the meaning of error last year. For other languages, it’s worst, I noticed that it translates any language into English and than to the other language.
The common names, I’m creating for most of the species, usually a translation. I don’t believe we have common names for 10% of our creatures, not even for families or orders.
In the comments, you need to duplicate both, the letters and the image, no matter if you space or not. It was easier when it had no images, the only options I have is to display word verification or not.
As we don’t have many sites talking about our species, using Portuguese words, Google always provide links for Insetologia. For exemple, searching for Identificação de Insetos (Insect Identification), the first link is an advertisement (with nothing to do), the second one is a PDF, the third is Insetologia.
I think that the grasshopper may be close to this Borneacris in the family Trigonopterygidae.
Thank you so much again!

Your identification looks correct to us Cesar.  Nice job of research.  Thanks for sending us the I.D.
We chose “Bug” just because the word has such a broad set of meanings.

Ed.  Note:
We have received a comment noting that the Borneacris is a genus in an Asian family and that this is most likely in the Subfamily Leptysminae which BugGuide calls the Spur-Throat Toothpick Grasshoppers.

Update courtesy of Karl:  February 4, 2016
Hi Daniel:
When this was initially posted three years ago it generated a considerable amount of commentary and several suggested identifications. It peaked my interest as well but, although I was not convinced by any of the suggestions offered, I could not come up with any reasonable alternatives to contribute. You eventually landed on Spur-Throat Toothpick Grasshopper (Acrididae: Leptysminae), but the length of the antennae, as well as size, shape and position of the eyes just didn’t look right. Today, however, I was trying to identify one of my own grasshopper photos when I came across a page on the  Orthoptera Species File Online site that immediately reminded me of the post by Cesar Crash (on behalf of Barbara Garcia). The reason it was so hard to track down is because it is so totally atypical. I am fairly certain that this is actually a Lubber Grasshopper, Legua rosea (Romaleidae: Romaleinae: Leguini). All the features of the head look correct to me and the limited range includes Brasilia. Better late than never? Regards. Karl

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Subject: Seattle Mystery Bug
Location: Seattle WA
February 1, 2013 7:55 am
I was wondering if you could tell me what this brown flying insect is, as seen in a Pacific Northwest living room on 01/31/2013. I’ve never seen one of these before, and now this is the second one I’ve found inside a house in two days. It may be very common, but is new to me. It’s brown and about 1 1/2” long. The pattern on the wings makes it look like it is made of wood. I thought it was a moth when it first flew by, but it is sort of slow moving, a clumsy flier, and heavier. Any thoughts?
Signature: A

Caddisfly

Dear A.,
You have had an encounter with a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera, and as we learned from BugGuide, there are:  “1,350 spp. in ~150 genera of 22 families in NA [North America]”
and we cannot say for certain how to classify it more specifically, though it does closely resemble several photos from the genus Psychoglypha that can be found on BugGuide.  Like you own observations, BugGuide notes that “Adults resemble moths, but wings are hairy instead of scaly.”  Larval Caddisflies are aquatic and they construct shelters, so they are commonly called Caseworms.  Interestingly, each species of Caddisfly Larva builds a different shelter, some of sticks, some of stones, some of shells and others from other materials.  According to bugGuide:  “Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.  The case’s particular shape and construction material is distinctive of the family and/or genus, and can be used in identification. Example: Helicopyschidae larvae use sand grains to build spiral cases that resemble small snail shells.”

You are amazing! Thanks so much for the response. Mystery solved.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug!!
Location: Guatemala
February 1, 2013 1:39 am
I got bit one night and sprayed some insecticide around my bedroom and found this guy in the morning. What is it?!
Signature: John

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear John,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae and though they have strong mandibles, they are not prone to biting unless they are carelessly handled.  This is not the creature that is biting you at night and which caused you to spray insecticide, but it is collateral damage as insecticide is rarely selective.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Bristol, CT
January 31, 2013 9:08 pm
I have a lot of these spiders showing up in my house, more since the cold weather has set in. They move really fast and seem to jump while on flat surfaces.
I live in CT in a wooded yard, I dont see them outside too much. I think they nest in my hatchway area.
I’m curious to know if they are harmful to my cat. He has eaten quite a few and doesn’t show any signs of illness.
Signature: K. Hart

Jumping Spider

Dear K. Hart,
It is impossible to determine the exact species of your spider, but we are certain it is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae and we suspect it is in the genus
Phidippus, possibly in the Phidippus audax group which you can find on BugGuide.  Jumping Spiders are harmless and they pose no threat to you, your family, your pets or your home.  They will prey upon other unwanted visitors in the home.  It is quite curious that you have significant numbers indoors.  We haven’t heard any previous mention of Jumping Spiders seeking the shelter of homes to pass the winter months.  Jumping Spiders are hunting spiders with excellent eyesight.  They do not spin a web to trap prey.  They stalk prey, including flies and other insects, and pounce on them from a considerable distance.

Thanks for the reply. I’m glad to know there is no threat to us or the fur kids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination