From the monthly archives: "January 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Spider
Location: Manglayang Mountain, West Cibiru, West Java, Indonesia
January 26, 2013 7:43 am
Hello again Daniel,
Last Thursday I go to the abandoned cabin in the woods again where I found the wolf spider.
This guy have this interesting long stretched legs, 2 tails like on the end of it’s abdomen, and beautiful colored abdomen.
I wonder what spider is it, hope that you could help.
ps. I sent the high res images…male and female.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Two-Tailed Spider

Dear Mohamad,
We are positively thrilled to receive this intriguing posting.  As your email notes, there are two tails on the abdomen that are very distinctive.  They are actually spinnerets, organs used by the spider for spinning silk.  A spinneret is identified on BugGuide as a:  “Structure at or near the tip of a spider’s abdomen which produces silk (there are normally a group of them).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Most spiders have spinnerets visible from only from the side or below. Prominent spinnerets visible from above help to identify the Family Gnaphosidae and the genus Agelenopsis in the family Agelenidae.”  We have never seen such prominent spinnerets, and it is also very unusual that your spiders have very short lets in the third pair.  We did an internet search for spiders with long spinnerets in Indonesia and found several images including this image on FlickR identified as a Two-Tailed Spider or Long Spinneret Bark Spider in the family Hersiliidae.  FlickR also has another image from Panama.  BioDiversity Explorer has this to say about South African Hersiliids:  They  “Have distinctive elongate lateral spinnerets, which are used in prey capture by swaying them over the victim thus wrapping the victim in silk. Two genera in southern Africa: Hersilia is usually found in trees and Tyrotama is usually found under rocks.
The Hersiliidae is a family of spiders noted for their elongated posterior lateral spinnerets which can be as long as the abdomen in long-spinnered bark spiders and less in rock living species. Hersiliids are small to medium (4.5-12.5mm body length) dorso-ventrally flattened spiders, especially the arboreal genera. They are cryptically coloured in variegated shades of cream, orange, green, brown, grey and black, features they share with the family Selenopidae. Both families are quick and difficult to capture as they disappear into the narrowest of crevices.”
  The Spiders of South India website has this information on the family:  “Popularly called two tailed spider, this is common spider in southern India. It lives on tree trunks of large tress and also common on the trunk of coconut palm. Its colour closely matches that of tree trunks in which it lives. It feeds on moths, ants, and other smaller spiders. Cocoon is generally laid in the holes crevices of tress. It can be easily identified by its long spinnerets.”  In trying to determine which species you have in Indonesia, we found Hersilia baliensis listed on Wikipedia, and searching that name led us to the Le Monde des Insectessite with images from Bali.

Two-Tailed Spider

Wow thanks a lot Daniel for the ID,
they are really hard to see even though the size is relatively big about 6 to 8 cm from toe to toe,
but when I try to see closely I mean really really closely 🙂 there they are just sitting there waiting for me take photos of them and there are a lot of them it’s about 5 or 6 with different sizes.
I sent you another photo of them with different background for whatsthatbug image database and another spider with long spinnerets that I couldn’t identify because I only could take one photo of them from right side before he run away, maybe next time I’ll hunt them down for a photo session :).

Two Tailed Spider

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: King Cricket Identification
Location: Warragul, Victoria, Australia
January 25, 2013 6:59 pm
Hello,
I have found what I believe to be some form of king cricket (Anostostomatidae), however I cannot find exactly what it is. I was wondering if you could help me define exactly what this is (Genus and species).
My intentions are to keep it as a pet until I receive supplies for a pinning board, then this will hopefully be my first pinned insect, I would love it if it could be labelled correctly.
Any help would be much appreciated.
Thank you
Signature: Ian Melbourne

King Cricket

Dear Ian,
We have not been able to locate a reliable online source for identifying King Crickets in the family Anostostomatidae to the species level.  Your individual is a male and it looks very much like this image posted to FlickR.  According to the Journal of Orthoptera Research:  “The Anostostomatidae, the family of Weta and King Crickets, is predominantly a southern hemispheric group and is represented by many species in Australia and New Zealand and a fre in New Guinea and New Caledonia.  The known faunas in southern Africa, Madagascar and Central America are apparently extensive, yet individual species are poorly known and there is still come confusion in the taxonomic hierarchy.  The relationships between the genera and species are very poorly known and at least the Australasian faunas have many yet to be described.  They are nearly all predators …”.

King Cricket

Perhaps one of our readers will have more information.

King Cricket

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Skull faced caterpillar
Location: Gamkaskloof ”Die Hell” Western cape, South Africa
January 25, 2013 3:03 am
Hi Guys.
On a recent camping trip, I found this little guy crawling along my serviette.
He was only about 20mm long and looked more like a caterpillar than a millipede / centipede.
Thank you.
Kevin
Signature: Skull faced caterpillar

Tussock Moth Caterpillar, we believe

Hi Kevin,
Our quick research turned up no visual matches, but we believe, based on the similarity of appearance to some North American Tussock Moth Caterpillars, that this is also a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the subfamily Lymantriinae.

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Daniel.
Thank you very much for your prompt reply.
Interesting – I will have to read further on what Tussock moths we get in SA.
Keep up the good work!
Kind Regards.
Kevin

Hi again Kevin,
You might have some books on South African insects in your local library.  If you find out what species this is, please write back to us with any updates.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: found
Location: jackson,, mississippi 39212
January 24, 2013 5:52 pm
While I was chopping wood I. Found the strangest insect.
Signature: Abraham White

Eyed Elater

Dear Abraham,
You didn’t clarify if you found this Eyed Elater among the wood, or if it was found upon splitting wood.  We needed to research something about the larval stage of the Eyed Elater,
Alaus oculatus, the largest North American Click Beetle, and this is what we learned on BugGuide:  “Larvae are predatory, eating grubs of wood-boring beetles like cerambycids (longhorns).”  BugGuide then provides this information on the life cycle:  “Eggs are laid in soil. Larvae predators of beetle larvae in decaying wood, especially hardwoods. Pupation is in unlined cell underground or in rotting wood.”  That would indicate that you would only find the Beetles among rotting wood, and not viable fire wood.  When Click Beetles wind up on their backs, like in your second photo, they are able to flex their bodies, producing an audible click, and the snapping action propels the Click Beetle into the air, often righting itself when it lands.

Eyed Elater on its back

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: creature 2 in my garden
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 24, 2013 5:36 pm
Last time I contacted you wonderful folks I sent you pics of what you later identified as a scarab beetle grub, or June bug grub. I have also found another creature, very similar, yet different to that other grub. The ”head” of creature number 2 is a different color and it’s ”arms” seem different. Also, crazy creature number 2 is FAST. I have video of this thing wiggling across the floor on it’s back, legs up in the air! so odd… can you identify what this one is, too? Thanks!!!
Signature: Bef so Def

Crawlyback

Hi Bef,
This is also the grub of a Scarab Beetle, but the behavior you describe indicates it is most likely a Crawlyback, the larva of a green scarab known as a FigeaterCrawlybacks are often found in compost piles.

Crawlyback

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Purple bug bloom?
Location: Renton WA
January 24, 2013 6:49 pm
I have several spots on the driveway that look like a spill or a mildew but on close exam they move and appear to be very tiny bugs. I have never seen this before. By the way, the weather has been below freezing at night and in the low forties in the daytime.
Signature: Jim N

Springtails

Hi Jim,
You have Springtails, tiny hexapods that often proliferate in great numbers under damp conditions.  They are benign creatures that can become a nuisance if they are too plentiful, however, they perform an important role in breaking down organic matter.  Here is a closeup image of Springtails from our archive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination