From the monthly archives: "January 2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tropical bugs
Location: Iguazu falls national park, Argentina/Brazil
January 31, 2013 9:03 am
I spent my last summer in the beautiful Iguazu falls. I saw a lot of these butterflies and spiders, but I have not been able to find the scientific names on the internet. Thanks a lot for your help.
Signature: Filipe De Vadder

Callicore hydaspes

Hola Filipe,
Both of you butterflies are in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, so we will create a single posting for them.  Though the one photo is quite blurry, the markings of
Callicore hydaspes are quite unmistakeable.  You can see clearer images of this species on the Butterflies and Beetles of Argentina website.  PHotos of the type specimens can be found on the Butterflies of America website.  Butterflies in this genus and related genera are sometimes called Eighty Eights or Eighty Nines because the patterns on the undersides of the lower wings are thought to resemble numbers.  We identified your second butterfly as Hypanartia lethe, and we found photos on the Butterflies and Beetles of Argentina as well.  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America, it is commonly called an Orange Mapwing, a name that is verified on the Neotropical Butterflieswebsite.

Orange Mapwing

Update:  February 1, 2013
We just checked out the Brazilian equivalent to What’s That Bug? and we are impressed with what Cesar Crash has done in a few short months.  We will be sure to link to it whenever we have a South American posting in the future.  Here is a recent posting of an Eighty Eight .  Just click the British flag and translate the posting into English.  There is also a Mapwing on Insetologia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bed Bug
Location: England, suburban near London, my bedroom
January 30, 2013 6:29 pm
Hello, I’ve asked for a few bugs to be identified from here before :), you might remember because I have no high quality cameras, so i drew the bug in paint. I was just lying down to nap when I noticed this bug on the wall (a white wall but permanently in the shade) next to my bed, inches away from where my head would lie. Naturally, I have been freaking out however since I am also curious about bugs and love biology, I’d like to know what it is before I banish it, and hopefully its not been biting me in the night. (I’d also like to know if it does bite or cause allergies, if there are going to be more around!)
When I tried to catch it, using paper and a jar, it seemed to jump quite quickly straight underneath the paper that was supposed to be hugging the wall. I then thought the bug was dead as when I put it on the ground to inspect it I could manipulate it with a bit of paper and it would not react, for example I turned it over to draw the underside, however when drawing it the right-way round it started moving around very slowly, which suprised me, so I guess this bug ’plays dead’. Hopefully that information will help if the pictures don’t haha. It’s also very very tiny, like an eyelash folded over on itself. It seems hairy or at least tiny spikes, please let me know if you can identify it because, I don’t know if I can sleep now :P.
Signature: Nick

Carpet Beetle Larvae

Hi Nick,
Thanks to your thorough letter and excellent drawing, we believe you have Carpet Beetle Larvae.  They do not bite, but they might have a connection to allergies.  Carpet Beetle Larvae are common household pests that feed on natural fibers and debris such as pet hair.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Hawaiian Huntsman?
Location: Kailua, HI
January 25, 2013 2:27 pm
My wife and I live in Hawaii on the Island of Oahu. We returned home one winter evening to find the pictured spider climbing all over an artificial landscape rock wall that is partially covered by vines. I searched around the net and arrived at your wonderful site. It appears that this is a Huntsman spider, but I’m a little unclear if it is also known as the Cane Spider? Are the distinctive dots on the back of its abdomen telling of it’s exact species? I think I’m thankful to have him around if he likes to eat cockroaches! Thank you!
Signature: Kevin in Kailua

Huntsman Spider

Hi Kevin,
Cane Spider is a common name associated with one particular species of Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, according to the Hawaiian Creatures website.  We cannot say for certain that this is a Cane Spider, but we believe that it is most likely one.  Like many species currently living and thriving on Hawaii, Heteropoda venatoria is an introduced species.  While preparing this response, we stumbled upon a lovely image on FlickR of a Floridian Huntsman eating a Cockroach. 

Whatsthatbug/Daniel,
Thank you so much for the response. I really like the Flickr link to the huntsman eating the cockroach. I see the remarkably similar appearance. I can now welcome this big buy to my property to do his good work.  Your site is a very helpful resource.
Mahalo/thank you!
Kevin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Beetle
Location: Ferntree Gully, Victoria, Australia
January 27, 2013 7:35 am
I found this very pretty looking beetle on a tree after a hike, my initial thinking is that it may be a form of ladybird or leaf beetle due to it’s shape, but I can’t seem to locate it or anything really close to it.
It has an almost pearl like sheen to it and the outer wing shells are clear at the bottom near its feet.
Anything you could do to help would be greatly appreciated.
Signature: Ian Melbourne

Tortoise Beetle

Dear Ian,
This is most definitely not a Lady Beetle, but we agree that it is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Though we could not find a match on the Brisbane Insect Website, it looks like it might be in the genus
Chrysophtharta, so it would be classified as a Tortoise Beetle in the subfamily Chrysomelinae.

Tortoise Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly/Moth
Location: Paynesville, Victoria, Australia.
January 29, 2013 4:30 am
A friend and i found this interesting bug and are unsure what it is… Please help!
Signature: Cheers, JJ Petho

Antlion

Dear JJ,
This is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae.  Though it doesn’t appear to match the individuals pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website, that is a nice place to learn more about these fascinating creatures.  The larvae are called Doodlebugs in North America.

Antlion

Thanks for taking the time to get back to me, will most defiantly look into it more. Thanks again.
– JJ

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of small black beetle?
Location: Western Washington
January 30, 2013 4:12 am
Hello I am in Western Washington and it has been about 40 degrees and wet lately. There were about 20 of these bugs that came in the house on a package that was delivered from Amazon and hidden behind a potted plant on our porch. I brought it in at night. I have never seen these bugs before which makes me believe they come out at night or live in the plant. It seems to have 4 white dots on it’s back. They just kind of wandered around the kitchen floor. Not towards dark…. although they didn’t seem to like the camera flash. They are about the size of a ladybug. Maybe slightly smaller.
Signature: Curious

Globular Springtail

Dear Curious,
This looks very much to us like a Globular Springtail in the order Symphypleona.  You can see BugGuide for additional information.  They are benign creatures that like a damp environment and they will not harm your home.  We don’t think you can blame Amazon for their presence.

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly! I read it the next day. I worded it kind of weird, but I didn’t mean to indicate possible blame on Amazon (we order tons of stuff through them), figured they were coming from some plant. I was just extra concerned because we have an 8 month old now =D
Have a great day!
Adam and Family

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination