From the monthly archives: "October 2012"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

The Baccharis in Elyria Canyon Park is still buzzing with activity.
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
October 6, 2012

Painted Lady

There were at least four individual Painted Ladies, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on the Baccharis this morning at about 9:30.  Though most of them were wary and kept their distance, this diminutive beauty, the smallest of them all, posed just a few feet from the camera.  This photo nicely illustrates the white bar on the forewing that is a distinguishing feature.

Painted Lady

Though the closed wing shot is of a different individual, we are confident that all the Ladies we observed today were Painted Ladies and not the similar looking West Coast Ladies or American Ladies.  The spots on the underwings of this individual are identifying features of the Painted Lady.

Gulf Fritillary

A lone Gulf Fritillary was also observed on the Baccharis as was a large Mexican Cactus Fly, a member of the Flower Fly family Syrphidae, and countless Honey Bees which were furiously gathering nectar.

Mexican Cactus Fly

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Queen Butterfly
Location: West Los Angeles
October 6, 2012 4:35 pm
Hi Bugman,
(This may be a duplicate submission).
Last year I sent in a picture of an unusual caterpillar which you identified as the Queen Butterfly Caterpillar (related to the Monarch). I was able to follow it and saw it chrysalize, but unfortunately, the Queen did not emerge. Well, it looks like the Queen has returned to our garden this year.
Jeff
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Queen

Hi Jeff,
We are thrilled to post your beautiful photos of a Queen, but we need to clarify that due to the black scent glands on the lower wings, this is a male Queen.  See this BugGuide image of a female Queen without the scent glands.  This is a wonderful followup to your Queen Caterpillar  photos from last year.  We are also very pleased that you were able to supply both an open and closed wing view of this lovely specimen.

Queen

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Painted, American or West Coast Lady?
Location: West Los Angeles
October 6, 2012 4:42 pm
Hi Bugman,
This smallish butterfly has been visiting lately. I have a guide book that shows three very similar butterflies: Painted Lady, American Lady and West Coast Lady. Is the pictured butterfly one of these?
Thx, Jeff
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Painted Lady

Hi Jeff,
This is, in our opinion, a Painted Lady,
Vanessa Cardui.  We observed at least four individuals this morning in the northeast portion of Los Angeles in Elyria Canyon Park.  They were nectaring on Baccharis.  We photographed at least two individuals and we are planning on posting some images soon.  According to BugGuide, the main visual differences between the American Lady and the Painted Lady are a “tiny white spot on the American Lady” which is absent on your individual and the number of eyespots on the underwings which your photo does not illustrate.  Another difference is the “squared-off wingtip of the American Lady versus the rounded wingtip of the Painted Lady” and your individual has the rounded wing tip.  The differences between the Painted Lady and the West Coast Lady are also covered on BugGuide which states:  “The most obvious character that separates this [West Coast Lady] from the very similar Painted Lady, is the large subapical bar near the front of the forewing, which is orange on this species (left) and white in The Painted Lady – V. cardui (right).”  Your individual has the white bar indicating that it is a Painted Lady.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Love
Location: Salado Creek Greenway Trail San Antonio TX
October 6, 2012 8:31 am
A couple of Yellow bordered Flower Buprestids making out on an Engelmans Daisy
Acmaeodera flavomartinata according to my Bug Guide. Had never seen this flower beetle before.
Signature: drequador

Mating Yellow Bordered Flower Buprestids

Dear drequador,
Thanks so much for sending us your photos of mating Yellow Bordered Flower Buprestids as well as for identifying them for us.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults common on flwrs of Asteraceae” which your photograph supports, and they range from “Central and west Texas / south to Brazil.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Indentiticatio
Location: Vasai, Maharashtra, India
October 4, 2012 10:18 am
Hi,
I found this huge bug just outside my office. The stray dogs were trying to kill it, but it was giving them a fight back so they backed off. So clicked a few pics and wanted to know what kind of bud it is. Help Appreciated… Thanks
Signature: Anyhow

Toe-Biter

Dear Anyhow,
We can’t help but to wonder if youngsters in India have a colorful name for the Giant Water Bug, an aquatic True Bug that American children, especially those in the south, call Toe-Biters. 
These Hemipteran behemoths have been reported to have bitten waders in freshwater lakes and ponds.  The Toe-Biter in your photo appears to be watching the camera.  We hope you weren’t bare-footed on those tiles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Torbay, Newfoundland, Canada
October 4, 2012 8:29 pm
I grew up in Newfoundland, as has my entire family….. none of us has ever seen this bug before. It’s about 4” long and literally reared up at me when I touched it! The forked prong came out of it’s mouth at that time. Weird!
Signature: Pat

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

Hi Pat,
This is a pre-pupal Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar, and considering your location, it is most likely a Canadian Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio canadensis.  The “forked prong” you described and photographed is a defense organ known as an osmeterium.  The Osmeterium releases an odor that some predators find offensive and it might also give the caterpillar the appearance of a snake that may discourage getting eaten by a bird.

Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination