From the monthly archives: "September 2012"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mourning Cloak butterfly on hydrangea paniculata ’tardiva’
Location: Naperville, IL
September 6, 2012 10:50 pm
Hi Daniel~
These hydrangeas attract all sorts of butterflies and dragonflies, not to mention bees, wasps, ants, and beetles in late summer. And they provide a nice afternoon backdrop for photographing insects, too. I hope you have a lovely weekend.
Signature: -Dori Eldridge

Mourning Cloak

Hi Dori,
It is nice to see your photo of a Mourning Cloak nectaring from a hydrangea.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed primarily on tree sap (oaks preferred) and rotting fruit; only occasionally on flower nectar.”
  This individual will most likely overwinter in some hollow tree or other protected spot, and if you are lucky, you will see it flying about on a sunny spring day when there is still snow on the ground.  Since they hibernate as adults, Mourning Cloaks are among the longest lived butterflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Bee Flies/Bee Mimics?
Location: Northeast Florida
September 3, 2012 2:30 pm
I’ve seen these insects in flowers in our yard and assumed they were bees. Today I came across a mating pair and took photos, and after searching here and at BugGuide, I think they may be Bee Flies or Bee Mimics? The one on the right kept trying to fly away, but the one on the left just kept dragging the other one along from place to place.
Signature: Karen in FL

Mating Bee Flies

Hi Karen,
As we frequently do when we need to research or verify some North American bug, we turned to BugGuide where we identified these mating Bee Flies as
Poecilanthrax lucifer.  According to BugGuide, “The larvae feed on the moth larva of members of the family Noctuidae.”

Mating Bee Flies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying Mantis with egg case
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
September 5, 2012 4:52 pm
Hello. I was fortunate to see this praying mantis laying an egg case. I am wondering — how long until it hatches? How many young are likely to emerge? Are there signs that it is about to hatch?
I live in Scottsdale, AZ (Phoenix area), and this photo was taken on August 31, 2012.
Thank you for your web fascinating web site!
Signature: Lucille

Preying Mantis lays Ootheca

Hi Lucille,
We are guessing that this might be
Stagmomantis limbata.  We hope one of our readers will be able to confirm or correct the species identification.  BugGuide states:  “Overwinter as eggs; hatch in spring or early summer; adults mostly in summer and autumn. Females in particular may sometimes survive well into winter.”  We suspect this ootheca may hatch in the spring and there may be several hundred young mantids that emerge.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Geolycosa
Location: Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico
September 5, 2012 7:57 pm
About a month ago, I’d sent in a number of photos of some of the local arthropods I’d encountered during my regular evening strolls around my location. Among them was a photo of a particularly large female Geolycosa specimen, which was featured in your response. I’ve been seeing quite a few more of these spiders around lately, even outside of their burrows (I’m including a photograph of an impressive male I’d found outside my office);

Male Burrowing Wolf Spider

additionally, this morning I was out checking on some plants when I decided to check on that very same aforementioned spider. At first, I thought what I was seeing was her full body outside the hole; while this is indeed part of what I was seeing, it took me a moment to notice the similarly-sized male on top of her. At first I was afraid she’d been attacked, but then I recalled something I’d seen before. I’d never witnessed this before myself, but I believe they were in the middle of mating! Ind eed, later the female was by herself in her usual position, more than healthy. I get the feeling we’re going to be seeing an awful lot of little ones.
Signature: Grady

Mating Burrowing Wolf Spiders

Dear Grady,
Thank you for following up on your previous posting.  The mating Burrowing Wolf Spiders must have been fascinating to observe.

Mating Burrowing Wolf Spiders

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada Killers
Location: Pelham, New Hampshire 03076
September 5, 2012 9:26 pm
Hi Bug man,
I just wanted to let you know I have 5 FIVE nests in my yard of Cicada Killers.
I have seen them going into the ground only after one buzzed by my head and out of the corner of my eye my first thought was a small bird.
Then I watched as it landed and went into the ground on the end of a mulch bed.
I was able to get a few pictures but nothing clear enough to send in.
Strange part is all the other people who sent in pictures live in the southern states.
I live in Pelham, New Hampshire.
This lady cicada is about 2 1/2 inches long the biggest of all in the 5 nests scattered around my 1.5 acre lot.
Thank you for having such a fantastic website.
Signature: Steve

Cicada Killer

Hi Steve,
The Cicada Killer is distinct enough to be recognized in your blurry photo, and we have no dearth of sharp images of Cicada Killers on our website.  We are pleased to hear you are living in harmony with them in New Hampshire.  Though BugGuide does not have any reports of Cicada Killers in New Hampshire, they are reported in nearby New York and Massachusetts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black butterfly
Location: Londonderry, New Hampshire
September 5, 2012 5:11 pm
What kind of a butterfly is this?
The wings are very tattered but it was still a thrill to see this beautiful butterfly today.
Signature: Laura

Red Spotted Purple

Dear Laura,
This is a very tattered Red Spotted Purple, and we hope you eventually have the opportunity to see and photograph a more pristine individual as they are easily contenders for the loveliest North American butterflies.

Thank you for identifying this butterfly for me.  I’d love to see a pristine one and I hope to see one this year.  This is the first time I can recall ever seeing one.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination