From the monthly archives: "July 2012"

Subject: Pukalani Wolf Spider
Location: Pukalani – Maui
June 25, 2012 5:44 pm
Aloha – Found this guy Sunday 24 June in my carport, near my orchids. Not sure if he found something to dine on amongst them, as the next morning he was gone on. About 3” across from the front pair of legs to the other.
Wish I had better contrast on his head for you. Knowing we have many hitchhikers into the islands, this guy could have come from *anywhere* on the planet.
Got a male Black Witch moth daytime photo the other week at the local post office.
Appreciate your site… always learn so much! Warm regards ~
Signature: Eliza

Huntsman Spider

Dear Eliza,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, not a Wolf Spider.  We believe it is
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has naturalized in many port cities around the globe.  According to Instant Hawaii, they are also known as Cane Spiders.

Aloha Daniel –
Perhaps it is seriously erroneous, yet I call all spiders who walk around looking for a meal “wolf” spiders.
Hmm, the usual markings, as illustrated on the Instant Hawaii site for a Huntsman, is missing. If it had been a Huntsman, I’d have not submitted it as I know them well. I remove various sized ones (2″ to about 5″, leg to leg dimension) from my house regularly.
So Giant Crab Spider = Huntsman? hmmmm
Maluhia – peace ~
Eliza

Subject: Possibly Ropalidia revolutionalis
Location: QLD Australia
June 24, 2012 1:24 am
This little wasp was between 4-6mm in length.. non aggressive.
Signature: SCWIDVICIOUS

Paper Wasp

Dear SCWIDVICIOUS,
We believe your identification of this Paper Wasp is correct based on this photo from Oz Animals.  The Brisbane Insect Website calls this the Small Brown Paper Wasp.

Subject: Orb Weaver
Location: Ambergris Caye, Belize, Central America
June 27, 2012 1:59 am
Good day…we are trying to find out what type of Orb Weaver spider this is. Many thanks!
Signature: Tamara Sniffin editor The San Pedro Sun Newspaper

Silver Argiope

Hi Tamara,
We believe your Orbweaver is a Silver Argiope,
Argiope argentata. Though we have numerous photos in our archive, this stock photography image on Photographers Direct looks more like your spider than the images we have posted.

Subject: A romantic liason between beetles?
Location: Toronto, Ontario
June 27, 2012 9:44 am
Hi Bugman,
I was out walking with my 3-year old daughter Rebecca, and we came across a patch of Wild Carrot plants, sporting many sets of frolicking insects… possibly some kind of long horn beetle? She asked if they were playing ’piggyback’, and not wanting to get into a discussion quite yet about the ’birds and the bee(tles)’, I agreed that they were most certainly having some kind of a good time. Would you know what kind of beetles these might be (a picture of them now appears as the desktop screen on my phone). Thanks! 🙂
Signature: AliA

Mating Common Red Soldier Beetles

Dear AliA,
These mating beetles are Common Red Soldier Beetles,
Rhagonycha fulva, and they are an introduced species from Eurasia that is found in the northern parts of North America.  We are very amused by another common name we found on BugGuide: the Hogweed Bonking Beetle. 

Thanks Daniel – “Bonking” Beetle is very appropriate!
Cheers!

Subject: Really BIG beetle
Location: Norfolk, MA
June 28, 2012 7:14 am
Hi–I’m attaching a few pictures of a really big beetle we found on a family walk last night. It was walking on the street, then went into the leaves, weeds, tree debris and pine needles on the shoulder. We live in Norfolk, Mass. We caught it in a jar and brought it home, where it captured the attention of both our dog and cat. It’s nearly 2 in. long, and We set it free the next day…We’re new to the area and all of its insects (June bugs, ticks, yuck), but we’re interested to learn what this was.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Caroline

Broad Necked Root Borer

Hi Caroline,
Summer is the season for large Longhorned Borer Beetles and your individual is a Broad Necked Root Borer,
Prionus laticollis.  You can read more about the Broad Necked Root Borer on BugGuide.