From the monthly archives: "February 2012"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown insect
Location: Grand Island, NE
February 4, 2012 5:46 pm
My wife found this insect in her bath towel. It left what appears to be a single puncture in her skin. We just want to know what it is.
Signature: John

Masked Hunter nymph, Unmasked

Dear John,
This is an immature Assassin Bug, but we had to do a bit of digging to identify the species even though this is one of the most common Assassin Bugs on our website.  This is an Masked Hunter nymph, though it is a bit atypical since Masked Hunter nymphs are generally covered in lint an debris that acts as camouflage for them.  We are guessing this individual is newly molted and it hasn’t yet had any lint or debris stick to it yet.  Masked Hunters are often found in the home, and we generally inform people that they are beneficial as they will eat other problematic insects and they are especially fond of hunting Bed Bugs.  Masked Hunters do not normally bite humans, but they will bite if carelessly handled or provoked.  Sadly, the accidental encounter your wife had resulted in a bite.  The bite is not considered dangerous, though the discomfort may last a few days.  Adult Masked Hunters are glossy black winged insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Leaf Mimic Katydid from Borneo
Location: Mt Kinabalu,Sabah,Malaysia
February 4, 2012 7:24 pm
Congratulations on a wonderful website. Could you or Piotr please identify this katydid? It was on a begonia leaf and about 5cm long (2.5 inches) and was found on the slopes of Mt Kinabalu in the forest during a trip we made in August 2011.It was an ornithological trip but the bugs were almost more compelling. Thanks
Signature: Mark Eller

Unknown Katydid

Dear Mark,
This Katydid is truly stunning, and the patterns and colors on its wings look gorgeous with the patterns and colors on the begonia leaf.  We had no luck with our initial attempts to identify this species, and we will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he is able to assist us.

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification
Hi Daniel,
This looks like Eulophophyllum (Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae), but probably an undesribed species. Very pretty.
Piotr

Update:  January 4, 2017
Peter Kirk just provided us with a pdf copy of the journal article that was published this past December.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle identification
Location: Jamaica
February 5, 2012 12:12 pm
Any chance I can get a definition and information about this type of beetle?
Photo taken in Jamaica, December 2011.
I am guessing but it is quite large, probably around 2 inches long.
Signature: Merrowain

Scarab Beetle from Jamaica

Dear Merrowain,
This is some species of Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae.  Our initial search has not produced a species match, but we will keep trying.

Karl tracks down the identification
Hi Daniel and Merrowain:
This scarab is one of the Fruit and Flower Chafers (Cetoniinae), specifically Gymnetis lanius. As far as I can tell the species is endemic to Jamaica, although there are four closely related sub-species found on other Caribbean islands (Cuba, Haiti, St. Lucia and Guadeloupe). The four black spots on the thorax are diagnostic for the species. I found out little else about the species, but here is a link to another online image.

Thank you both very much for the information. Greatly appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTB
Location: Termeil NSW 2539
February 5, 2012 5:15 am
Hi again…this fly ?..has been hanging around,looking at me,pointed at me,shows great interest,will let me get 4ft away..hovers then darts off,comes back hovers,from 2 to 6ft off the ground,pointing toward me..,I think it lives near where I chop firewood under a large Blue Gum..seen it there twice,might get a video tomorrow.Sun shining today.Thanks.
Signature: Bugger

Bee Fly

Dear Bugger,
This is a True Bee Fly in the subfamily Bombyliinae and we found a matching image of a resting individual on the Brisbane Insect website, though it is not identified by species.  The proboscis on your specimen is definitely a match to the mouth on the image we located.

Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ethereal Insect Photographs Will Cure Your Phobia of Bugs
February 5, 2012
Malaysian photographer Lee Peiling created images so fantastic, it feels like you’re peering into another world. A world populated with helpful prayin… Read more

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large Unkown Fly
Location: South-Africa, Gauteng
February 4, 2012 4:40 pm
Dear Bugman,
I live in South Africa. We have a huge diversity in insects. I was in our town outside a clothing store, and there is this waste high, round steel barrier (about 3-4 inch wide) in front of it. As I waited outside the store an insect came and sat on this steel barrier… At very 1st I quickly thought it might be a bumble bee of some sort as it has quite a large size. It was black, very hairy and with 1 white stripe on its back above the wings. Upon closer inspection I realized that it was some sort of fly. I immediately took out my mobile phone and took 3 photos before it flew away. I have NEVER in my 30 years seen a fly like this and at such a huge size. Can you please tell me what it could be, as I think this might be a new species Insecta Diptera…
Thank you!
Signature: Eugène McLaren

Carpenter Bee Robber Fly

Dear Eugène,
This magnificent predator is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae.  We are not certain of the species, but it most closely resembles North American Robber Flies in the genus
Laphria, the Bee-Like Robber Flies.  On BugGuide they are described as “most species are black and yellow mimics of bumble bees or carpenter bees.”  The Bee-Like Robber Flies look similar to the Bee Killers in the genus Mallophora, but they can be distinguished by their antennae.  According to BugGuide, the Bee Killers are:  “Large, fuzzy, bee-mimicking robber flies. Resemble Laphria, another genus of robbers that mimic bumblebees, but is even hairier and has antennae with a very thin terminal final segment, whereas Laphria has thick antennae.”  Your individual has the thick antennae.  Continued research revealed that this is an entirely different genus.  We believe we have correctly identified your Carpenter Bee Robber Fly, Hyperechia marshalli, by a description on the Google Books Field Guide to Insects of South Africa where it is described as:  “Large (wingspan 34-44 mm), stout carpenter bee-mimic, uniformly black with yellow to yellowish white band of hair on hind margin of metathorax.  Legs thickly covered with long hair.  Biology: “Rests and oviposits on tree trunks.  Adults hunt from dead trunks bored by carpenter bees.  They feed on carpenter bees and other bees and wasps.  Larvae bore and live in wood tunnels in association with carpenter bee larvae, on which they are reported to feed.”  We then found a matching image on Global Species.  There is a nice photo on FlickR and another on ZipZode Zoo.

Carpenter Bee Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination