What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Terrified
Location: Georgia
February 28, 2012 4:18 pm
Please help me ID this spider Im terrified he might bite my 3 year old. I’ve killed 2 in my house in the last 3 days. Its the biggest spider ive seen in person ever. 2 friends say it looks like a wolf spider— How do I keep them out of my house?
Signature: Squeemish in GA

Terrified Spider

Dear Squeemish in GA,
If Spiders were capable of being terrified, the possible Wolf Spider in your photo is most assuredly terrified.  You live in Georgia.  It is the south and there are numerous spiders and insects both indoors and outdoors.  The only way we can think of for keeping spiders out of the house might be to move to Antarctica, or then again, maybe not anymore.

That was most unhelpful- Thanks for nothing. I would have preferred to
get no reply over a smart-alec one.

Dear Squeemish in GA,
While we understand that you might be squeamish about spiders, Wolf Spiders are relatively harmless.  It is also true that Southern States, because of the milder climates, tend to have a higher population of larger insects and other arthropods for the greater part of the year.  Insects and spiders are everywhere and they occasionally wander into the home.  You can spend a great deal of money attempting to hermetically seal your home from the natural world, and creatures may still enter.  Some folks claim that placing osage oranges in the home discourages spiders, but we cannot verify that claim.  See the Great Plains Nature Center website for information on osage oranges.

You are most welcome.  You should read Spider Champion Ms Muffet’s comment on your posting:
2012/02/29/possibly-wolf-spider/

Thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Georgia

4 Responses to Terrified Wolf Spider

  1. MsMuffet says:

    Dear Squee, don’t be afraid. :^) Unless your daughter catches one and does it some harm, she has zero chance of being bitten by one of these guys. They don’t want any trouble, they just want to be outside to eat big bugs, including garden pests. Also, like you, they are devoted mothers: they carry their babies constantly on their body until they are big enough to fend for themselves!
    We have loads of them where I live in the mountains of Maryland, and they have never bitten anybody I know. I just take them outside when I find one. (I let small spiders stay inside: they eat flies, gnats, mosquitoes, etc.)
    If you approach one casually with an upside-down glass or plastic jar, you may be able to set it down over the spider, then gently slide a thin, stiff piece of cardboard (like a big postcard or calendar cover) under the jar. Then you can pick the whole thing up and take it outside to let the spider go. But don’t worry if you can’t catch it. It’s doing its level best to stay out of your way!

  2. Morgan says:

    Just out of curiosity, should medical attention be sought in the case of a bite? I didn’t know that I had a young one on me and it got inadvertently pinched and of course, it bit…lol. It feels about like a yellow jacket sting, and I had no reason to worry until my husband looked it up and found information lumping them into a venomous category with widows and recluses! Of course I’ll keep an eye on it, and if I have more of a reaction than a yellow jacket sting, then I guess I’ll go to the doc, but this page has so much good info about bugs of all types that I figured someone here would know more than hypochondria-inducing google. Thanks!

    • bugman says:

      To the best of our knowledge, the bite of a Wolf Spider would produce a localized reaction similar to a bee sting, but we would never rule out the possibility of a more severe allergic reaction in certain individuals. Since we are not qualified to offer medical advice, we would never entirely rule out a dangerous reaction. Let your body be your guide.

      • Morgan says:

        Thank you! I managed to get in touch with a friend who is trained as a paramedic, and he gave me a similar answer. Ice pack, steroid cream, and a couple of days later, no serious reaction. It’s only a little spot with no swelling, pain or itchiness. Much less bothersome than a bee sting. Now, if only the hypochondriacs on google could document that! Lol!

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