From the monthly archives: "January 2012"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wondering what this is?
Location: Bemidji, MN (Northern MN)
January 27, 2012 6:34 am
Hello,
My little 4 year old and I were trying to Google and identify this tonight. We were unsuccessfull so I’m writing to you for help. We took these pictures on 4/25/2011 at 10pm. It was outside our side door of the garage. We lived in the woods, thick with almost 40 year old red pines (planted as a tree farm, and then a couple homes were built within). Within a quarter mile is a small stream and wet land area. Hope this helps.
Signature: Thank you! Krissy H.

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Dear Krissy,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle, and as its name indicates, it is an aquatic insect, however, it is also capable of flight if its pond dries out, runs out of food, or it seeks a mate.  It is in the family Dytiscidae (See BugGuide) and we cannot provide you with an exact species name, but perhaps Markikavana will write in with an identification.  The predatory larvae of Predaceous Diving Beetles are sometimes called Water Tigers.

Daniel,
Thank you so much.  I really appreciate it!  I think I made a donation to your site the day you sent me this email, now I can’t find a receipt.  Can  you tell if I indeed made the donation, sometimes I sit down to do something and can finish it due to my 4 year old–he doesn’t like it when I’m on the phone or computer.
Thanks again!
Krissy Hughes

Thanks for your kind intentions Krissy.  We will copy our webmaster who keeps track of website finances to see if he can verify the donation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Malaysian Butterfly
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
January 26, 2012 8:22 pm
This butterfly (?moth) flew in the open window last night and landed on my shoulder while watching TV! Can you help me identify it?
Signature: Jason

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Jason,
We rather quickly identified your moth as
Lyssa zampa on the Habitat News website from Singapore, though it helped greatly that we recognized the family as Uranidae.  The Habitat News website states:  “The species is found across the Indo-Australian region and is usually enountered in forested areas and nearby urban areas, as it is attracted to the lights there. Altitudinally, they can be found as high as 2,600 metres on Gunung Kinabalu, Sabah! The food plants of the caterpillars are reportedly species of Endospermum (Family Euphorbiaceae); see Barlow’s Moths of Borneo.  While they flutter around readily at night, they are usually immobile in the day (unless disturbed and need to relocate to a suitable perch), allowing a good view of their beautiful wings. I remember the spectacular (and at the time, slightly intimidating) sight of numerous individuals perched on ceilings and walls on damp nights when I was a child. I am of the impression they were more numerous three decades ago.”  In a more recent posting to the Habitat New website, the moth is called the Tropical Swallowtail Moth.

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Thanks Daniel, we really appreciate the feedback!
Regards,
Jason.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Funky Orange Caterpillar
Location: Sydney, Australia
January 26, 2012 6:19 am
Hi bugman,
We found this little guy roving around our back deck, celebrating Australia day in style. It was a slightly brighter orange colour than the photo shows. Just wondering what it might be? Obviously some kind of hornworm but I couldn’t see any entries already on your site depicting something that looked the same.
Signature: Many thanks, Bridget.

Hornworm: Theretra latreillii

Hi Bridget,
We quickly identified your caterpillar as a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, but we had to expend some effort to properly identify it.  There are many possibilities of Sphingidae on the Butterfly House website, and the thumbnails are often so small that we need to visit the individual pages.  At first we thought we had identified your caterpillar as
Hippontion celerio, but the Butterfly House images show a much more delicate caudal horn.  A much better match is  Theretra latreillii on Butterfly House, which states:  “Normally the eyespot is hidden by a fold in the skin of the first abdominal segment, and the spot is only displayed when the animal is disturbed. Indeed when the skin is folded, the head and prothorax look like the upper jaw, and the first set of legs like the lower jaw, of some much larger beast, which may deter predators.”  The Brisbane Insect website identifies the adult as the Pale Brown Hawk Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spitfire Grub?
Location: Canberra
January 25, 2012 9:54 pm
Woud you please identify this bug, found in a dwarf snow gum on 26 January 2012 at 1100.
Signature: Bill Reid

White Stemmed Gum Moth Caterpillar

Hi Bill,
After some searching, we determined that your caterpillar is a member of the family Anthelidae.  According to the Encyclopedia of Life:  “a small family of moths restricted to Australia, New Guinea and the adjacent Aru archipelago. At present the family comprises 74 species in 8 genera described from Australia (Edwards and Fairey 1996) and 20 species from new Guinea in one endemic genus and one genus shared with Australia. However, numerous distinct species have already been identified as undescribed in museum collections such as the Australian National Insect Collection (ANIC).”  Some taxonomists consider them to be closely related to the Lappet Moths and Tent Caterpillars.  We eventually identified your caterpillar as
Chelepteryx collesi, the White Stemmed Gum Moth on the Butterfly House website where we learned that “This Caterpillar is a great hazard to people climbing Gum trees. Scattered over its skin are tufts of long stiff reddish hairs, which are strong enough to penetrate human skin. When they do, they are very painful, and difficult to remove because they are barbed and brittle.”  Another bit of information from Butterfly House is:  “It is also one of the largest Caterpillars in Australia, growing in length to about 12 cms. Some trees where they may be found most years in Leichhardt are known by local school-children as ‘sausage trees’ because the Caterpillars look from the ground like sausages growing in the trees.”

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for this information.  I have many friends here and overseas that are interested.
A great service that you provide.
Best wishes
Bill Reid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Water Bug
Location: Queensland, Australia
January 26, 2012 12:50 am
Hi guys,
Hope you like these shots of a giant water bug that was hanging around banging into a shiny piece of stainless steel in my carport. They will often mistake a reflective surface for water and attempt to drop into it.
The bug played dead when I got close to it and it allowed me to turn it over for a shot of its piercing mouthparts. It was determined not to give itself away until I picked it up and took it over to some long grass. When I dropped it on the grass it quickly righted itself and flew away.
Signature: aussietrev

Water Scorpion

Hi Trevor,
The very flattened body and extremely long, posterior breathing tube indicates that this is a Water Scorpion, and not a closely related Giant Water Bug.  Interestingly, we found a photos of a Water Scorpion from Australia submitted by you in 2008 in our archive.  We decided to do a bit more research and we found the AusEmade website that has a photo of an Australian Water Scorpion from Simpsons Gap that is identified as
Laccotrephes tristis and contains this information:  “One of the interesting looking insects found swimming in the pools is the Water Scorpion, whose other common name is Toe-biter. These strange looking creatures are carnivores, feeding on other aquatic organisms that they can capture including tadpoles, small frogs and small fish. They swim with the tip of their long needle like tail breaking the water surface, acting as a breathing siphon.  With their large pincer-like forelegs used for seizing their prey, Water Scorpions can inflict a nasty nip, although they are also known to play dead when disturbed. Once they have grasped their prey, they inject a venom that liquefy the prey from the inside, which enables the Water Scorpion to suck out the prey’s body fluid.”  The Identification and Ecology of Australian Freshwater Invertebrates website also has some good information.  The Atlas of Living Australiahas a distribution map.

Water Scorpion

If you look closely at your close-up photos, you can see tiny red spots which we suspect are Mites.  Several sources indicate a common name of Toe-Biter which is shared with the North American Giant Water Bugs.

Water Scorpion

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug Art
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
January 26, 2012 7:35 am
Here is my last creation. I let it hangin’ on my bed. Isn’t it adorable?
Signature: Cesar Crash

Cockroach Sculpture by Cesar Crash

Hi Cesar,
Thanks for reminding us that you have submitted other insect sculptures.  We will need to search the archive and categorize them as Bug Art.  Does this Cockroach Sculpture scare away the real roaches which we are guessing are much smaller than this in Brazil?

It have only scared humans till now! Thank God I have no problems with cockroaches at home. The only ones that appear are those burrowing crusty ones. And some wild roaches that have no fear for humans.
Perhaps it will attract a giant Ampulex compressa!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination