From the monthly archives: "January 2012"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

”pine cone” cocoons in Pennsylvania
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
December 1, 2011 1:37 pm
Dear Bugman,
I noticed these mini pinecone-looking cocoons growing on the back of a stop sign by my work. Could you help me identify what creature created these cocoons? Thank you very much.
Signature: Kyle Helal

Bagworms

Dear Kyle,
You have noticed the cocoons of Bagworms, a family of moths whose caterpillars construct bags from silk and foliage.  The caterpillar enlarges the bag as it grows, dragging around its home as it feeds.  When it is time to metamorphose, the Bagworm retains its bag to house the pupa.  Female Bagworm Moths are flightless and mate in their bags.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Australian Moth
Location: Sydney’s Northern Beaches
January 2, 2012 5:41 pm
Hello again bugman. I’ve got another potentially tricky moth for you. I managed to find a photo of a similar one on the net, that was of a moth in Georgia, U.S. (http://sparkleberrysprings.com/v-web/b2/index.php?m=200703). Could mine be the same species (I’m in Australia after all)?
Thanks for the previous identification!
Signature: Ridou

Redlined Looper

Dear Ridou,
We are very happy you included a photo of the distinctive underside of this Geometer Moth.  We quickly identified it as a Redlined Looper,
Crypsiphona ocultaria, on the Brisbane Insect website, and then we substantiated that identification on Dave’s Garden.

Redlined Looper

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Happy New Year
Location: Queensland, Australia
December 31, 2011 8:01 pm
Hi guys,
Happy New year to all, hope it is another great one for bugs.
Thought you might like this shot of an Ironbark Cicada. They are emerging in great numbers right now following a quite wet December. This is about as big as they come, I have seen ones only half this size so perhaps the difference is gender.
They don’t make a lot of noise and will scurry around to the other side of the tree as you walk around trying to spot them. Very frustrating.
Signature: Aussietrev

Ironbark Cicada from Australia

Happy New Year to you as well Trevor.
Thanks for thinking of us and sending your wonderful photo of a new Australian Cicada species for our site.  We found a page devoted to Cicadas in the genus
Burbunga from Australia that are called Bark Cicadas, but other than that, we cannot locate much information.  The hiding behavior you describe is typical of many of the Leafhoppers and Treehoppers that are classified with Cicadas in the superfamily Cicadoidea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination