From the monthly archives: "December 2011"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this?
Location: Central Florida
December 1, 2011 3:53 pm
Took my dogs out back today and immediatly my smallest one ran to the side when he saw a bug. This bug released what looked like a milky substance from its backside (a defense mechansim, don’t know). The bug still hasn’t moved it is completely still. I wasn’t able to locate any eyes.
Signature: Thank you

Tersa Sphinx

This incredibly streamlined moth is one of the Hawkmoths or Sphinx Moths, and more specifically it is the Tersa Sphinx, Xylophanes tersa.  You may read more about the Tersa Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Do you know what this is?
Location: Martin, Western Australia
December 2, 2011 3:46 am
Hi,
I found this bug/insect/alien on my bed and I’m just wondering what it is. It seems to have feathers on its back legs and can do somersaults if it has to.
Do you know what it is?
Thanks
Signature: Hannah

Unidentified Leaf Footed Bug

Dear Hannah,
At first we thought that this was a Leaf Footed Bug or Big Legged Bug in the family Coreidae, but we couldn’t find it pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.  Additional research led us to a listing in our own archives that identifies this as a Feather Legged Assassin Bug or Ant Assassin,
Ptilocnemus lemur.  We had originally misidentified that submission as a Leaf Footed Bug as well.  There is some helpful information on the Myrmician website.  Here are photos of mounted specimens from the Agriculture Western Australia website.  Larena Woodmore also has a very nice photo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

chrysalis or cocoon
Location: Mountains of North Carolina
December 2, 2011 9:51 am
Found on Physocarpus , a North American native shrub.
What is inside it?
Thank you for your help.
Signature: Carol

Cocoon of a Giant Silkmoth

Dear Carol,
This is the cocoon of a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  A Cocoon is generally a silken structure that is spun, possibly incorporating leaves, branches or the hairs from the caterpillar in its construction.  The cocoon helps to protect the naked pupa inside.  The pupa of a butterfly is often called a chrysalis.  We hope that helps some with the proper terminology.  We believe this may be a Polyphemus Moth Cocoon (see BugGuide) or possibly a Luna Moth Cocoon (see bugguide), though the cocoons of the Luna Moth generally fall to the ground among leaf litter where a blanket of snow helps to insulate them from the cold.

Cocoon of a Giant Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

can you help identify this bug?
Location: houston/cypress, texas
December 2, 2011 11:23 am
We were curious what kind of bug this is. Any ideas?
Signature: thank you, jennifer

Unknown Wasp Moth

Dear Jennifer,
This is actually a Moth that mimics a wasp for protection.  We cannot determine for certain from your photo if this is a member of the family Sesiidae (see BugGuide), our first choice, or of the Tiger Moth subtribe Euchromiina (see BugGuide).  The Moth Photographers Grouphas many similar looking members in the family Sesiidae, commonly called the Clearwing Moths, though we cannot find an exact match.  The markings on the legs and antennae are quite distinctive in your photographs.

Unknown Wasp Moth

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Jennifer:
It looks like Horama plumipes. The taxonomy for Wasp Moths (as well as Tiger Moths and related taxa) is a little confusing as the whole group has been undergoing revision. Some internet sites still classify the genus Horama as Family Arctiidae: Subfamily  Ctenuchinae, but most have now switched to Family Erebidae: Subfamily Archtiinae. This includes Bugguide (which includes H. panthalon [the Texas Wasp Moth] but doesn’t appear to have any photos H. plumipes) and the Butterflies and Moths of North America site (but again, no images). Horama plumipes is primarily a Central American species, ranging from Southern Texas to Nicaragua. I suspect it is rather rare in Texas. You can also check out the Moth Photographers Group or the site for the Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), Costa Rica. Regards. Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unnowne bug
Location: central fla
October 28, 2011 9:47 am
bug with crab like claws spider face,found in merritt island fl.
size 3”
Signature: phionex207@aol.com

Giant Vinegaroon

Dear phionex207,
Though this Giant Vinegaroon is an Arachnid  that is distantly related to venomous creatures like spiders and scorpions, the Vinegaroon does not pose a threat to humans as it has no venom.  It is capable of releasing a mild acetic acid that smells like vinegar, hence the common name.  The Giant Vinegaroon is a Tailless Whipscorpion that is also sometimes called a Grampus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Silver-Black Spider from Nepal
Location: Nepal, Bandipur
December 22, 2011 12:51 pm
Could you help to identify this big spider?
May be a Silver Orb Spider ???
Found: 18. Oct. 2011, on an external, insect-trapping web.
Signature: Jürgen J. Müller

Orbweaver

Hello Jürgen,
Our research did not turn up anything conclusive.  We agree that this is an Orbweaver, and it might be in the genus
Argiope.  Perhaps in the future, we will be able to provide a more specific identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination