What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mass of larvae
Location: suburbs of New York City
September 23, 2011 10:04 am
Hi,
What are these? Photo attached
Thanks
Signature: Jane

Fungus Gnat Larvae aggregation

Hi Jane,
You have an aggregation of Fungus Gnat Larvae.  According to BugGuide, they migrate when there is a population explosion. 

Fungus Gnat Larvae

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: New York

4 Responses to Fungus Gnat Larvae

  1. alix1963 says:

    I would very much like to use an image of a snake of fungus gnat larvae posted by Jane, in a children’s educational book I am producing called ‘Wow! Wildlife Animal Camouflage’ for Rosen. The print run will just be 1,000, and the size of the image would just be a small inset picture. Do you own copyright? If you do, could we use the image? Or could you possibly give me a contact email of the person who does (i.e. Jane?) I will put a credit inside the book, and could pay a small fee.
    All the best,
    Alix Wood

    • bugman says:

      Hi Alix,
      What’s That Bug? does not own the copyright to photographs submitted to our site, but we reserve the right to publish photos and letters to our website and to other What’s That Bug? authorized publications. We fully support educational books. Smaller publications, which are basically labors of love fall, are of special interest to us. We will allow you to use the image in your book. Please credit Jane and What’s That Bug? and should Jane ever respond to this posting and comment, you can work out the payment details with her.

  2. Jared B says:

    Wow, I have been looking for this for some time. I just returned from a trip to Peru where I swa this strange cluster. My wife was not impressed adn would not fork over the camera! But this pic is exactly what I saw. Thanks

  3. Bart says:

    Here in rural central Virginia we are seeing several masses of these crossing our large blacktop parking area. As they move over the rough surface the mass looses members as it migrates across the blacktop. Those that are left behind appear to die within an hour or so. Since they are crossing an area of some 30 feet, a good number of them do not make it across.

    Ants that run across them so far have shown little interest in either the live ones or the dead.

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