What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long shot… cute squiggly brown moth
Location: Norther Colorado mountains
July 19, 2011 9:40 am
Yea, I know noctuid moths (which I assume this guy is) can be tough. A long time moth enthusiast (all bugs actually) I leave the light on for them and love seeing who came to visit over night. I no longer kill and collect them, but I do regularly refer back to my 4-H collection.
This guy visited a couple days ago (July 11th, give or take. I can’t seem to pin him down (no pun intended). For some reason, I decided to focus my attention to identifying it this morning, 3 hours online, no avail. Any thoughts?
Norther Colorado foothills/mountains, 15 miles by crow west of Fort Collins, 40 miles by crow south of Wyoming. 8100 feet.
Signature: Matt B

I’d also like to add… if there is a need, I’d be happy to volunteer some time to help with ID requests. Especially those that are semi local to me, as I am pretty familiar with northern CO species, having collected hundreds of different species during my 10 year 4-H entomology tenure…
Feel free to fwd anything that comes in. I love the challenge  🙂
Love your website!
Matt

Unknown Moth

Hi Matt,
Your are sure right about some moth identifications being extremely difficult.  We are posting your photo and indicating that it is unidentified.  We hope our readership is able to provide an identification.  We greatly appreciate your identification offer.  You might want to start to peruse our unidentified tag to see if you can provide comments to any of those postings.

Identification provided thanks to littlechkn’s comment
Seems this may be The Scribe or Lettered Habrosyne, and the images on BugGuide looks correct.  It is in the family Drepanidae, the Hooktip Moths and False Owlet Moths.

Tagged with →  
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Colorado

2 Responses to The Scribe

  1. lttlechkn says:

    Looks to be Habrosyne scripta based off of photos found here http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Habrosyne-scripta , though it could also be some closely related specimen such as Habrosyne gloriosa. (both are found in Colorado)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *