From the monthly archives: "January 2011"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Roatan Honduras Spider? Crab?
Location: Roatan, Honduras
January 2, 2011 10:44 pm
I snapped this photo of what I thought was a huge spider on Roatan Honduras. The local told me it was a crab, not a spider. Any ideas?
Signature: Thanks! Laurie

Possibly Huntsman Spider

Dear Laurie,
It is impossible to be certain because of the angle of your photograph, but we believe this is a Huntsman Spider, possibly
Heteropoda venatoria.  It is not a crab.

Possibly Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Daniel, We have baby monarchs

Location: South Pasadena, CA
January 3, 2011 12:44 am
Since I planted the milkweed a few years ago, I’ve had occasional monarch butterfly visitors, and a single caterpillar last summer. Then a few days ago I started finding these. I counted at least eight of them in two different sizes. This is pretty exciting for me. It doesn’t seem like the right season, but I guess they know better.
Signature: Barbara

Monarch Caterpillar

Hi Barbara,
This is really exciting.  Congratulations on your good fortune.  We would love to know what species of milkweed you are growing in Southern California and where you acquired your plants.

Monarch Caterpillar

I got the milkweed at a Huntington Library plant sale.  I’ve lost the tag, and I don’t remember what species it is, but it has nice red and yellow flowers and seeds like crazy.  The birds and bugs like it, and it’s quite pretty most of the time if I trim off many of the seed pods.  I’d be happy to give you some seedlings which pop up everywhere there’s a little water.

Monarch Caterpillar

Hi Barbara,
I in no means mean to disparage the Huntington which is a marvelous garden and resource for the public, but if they have milkweed, it is probably an exotic species from a faraway land.  I was hoping to hear that you got your milkweed from the Theodore Payne Society, a non profit organization in Sun Valley that sells native plants.  I may do a book signing there this spring.  I am currently working towards trying to preserve our local milkweeds.  Clare Marter Kenyon, a local activist who was behind the City of Los Angeles’ Protected Native Tree Ordinance, formerly the Oak Tree Ordinance, informs me that there are three species of native milkweeds in Elyria Canyon Park in Mt Washington, and I plan to try to propagate them.  I have never seen a Monarch on the milkweeds in Elyria Canyon Park, but there are always Large Milkweed Bugs on them.
ProtectedTreeOrd
Daniel

Ed. Note: January 5, 2010
Clare Marter Kenyon just sent us this link:
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/home_blog/2011/01/milkweed-for-butterflies.html

Update: May 3, 2011
Obtaining Native Milkweed
May 3, 2011 9:44 am
Dear Bugman,
I was reading your tag on Monarchs and milkweed (asclepias).  If you havent found sources yet, there are some great native nurseries throughout the state (check www.cnps.org for a thorough list).  One near LA is Las Pilitas Nursery, www.laspilitas.com, they have great photos and information.  The SF Bay area has Annies Annuals (where I purchased my milkweed).  Both of these companies are responsible propogaters and have excellent mailorder service. I have my first crop of Narrow leaf milkweed (asclepias fascicularis)growing in this year.  We may only get a few monarchs drifting in but many insects enjoy it. Kudos and thank you for getting out the word that our monarchs need Native milkweed to thrive.  I consider it far lovelier than the tropical variety.  Before I knew better I had tropical milkweed planted and all it attracted was flies!
Signature: Colleen Clark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tanzanian bug
Location: Northern Tanzania
January 2, 2011 8:31 am
Hi,
when on a charity trip to tanzania we found this bug. He was living in dryish grassland on the top of a small inactive volcano. It was mid july – which is their cooler, dry season. There were quite a few around but we’ve had no luck identifying it. Wondering if you could help?
thanks
Signature: SR

Picasso Bug

Dear SR,
Just last month we posted a photo of this species of Shield Bug and one of our readers wrote in to supply us with a species identification.  Karl wrote in:  “Picasso Bug and Zulu Hud Bug are the two common names I found for this guy.  It’s a Shield-backed Bug (Scutelleridae), probably Sphaerocoris annulus, but there could be similar species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beautiful grasshopper
Location: Namibia, Africa
January 2, 2011 11:58 am
Found this beautiful grasshopper in our yard. I did not see any other quite like it on your website.
Signature: Echols

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Echols,
We believe this is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae
We have numerous examples from Africa and Australia in our archives.


Update: December 13, 2016
Based on a submitted comment, we now believe this is
Phymateus baccatus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large Catterpillar
Location: Algarve Portugal
January 2, 2011 12:41 pm
Probably the largest catterpillar i’ve seen. I would say about 4.5ins. More flourescent green in real life than appears on the photos.
Could you help indentify it for me.
There are more photos if required.
Signature: Eduardo

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Eduardo,
This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth,
Acherontia atropos.  In August we posted a photo and letter from Portugal regarding a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar and you may also read about it on the UK Moths website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Identify caterpillar
Location: Southern Saskatchewan, Canada (Estevan)
January 2, 2011 7:26 am
Hi
If you could identify this caterpillar found in southern Saskatchewan, Canada in the Fall that would be wonderful.
Signature: Karen

Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Karen,
We believe this is an Achemon Sphinx Caterpillar, and it appears that it may have left its food plant and begun to hunt for a likely spot to dig into the earth and pupate.  The Sphingidae of the Americas website indicates that there are no reported sightings of the Achemon Sphinx in Saskatchewan, though it is suspected to range in the region.  Because of that, we are copying Bill Oehlke on this reply and he may request permission to use your photograph as well as to include your sighting data so he can update the status of the Achemon Sphinx in Saskatchewan.  You can read about the Achemon Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Hi Daniel,
Yes, that one is Eumorpha achemon. Thanks for referral.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination